User: flenvcenter Topic: Four Corners-Independent
Category: Institutions and Companies
Last updated: Sep 17 2019 01:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Fall brings professors, pedalers and presidential candidates 16.9.2019 Current Issue
Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet stops by our office, and we wish a fond farewell to a longtime staffer.
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To protect a forest, a town agreed to leave it alone 9.8.2018 Writers on the Range
With wildfires looming, Flagstaff came together to support national forest closures.
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Wildfire and Invasive Species Drives Increasing Size and Cost of Public Land Restoration Efforts 7.9.2017 Environmental News Network
An examination of long-term data for lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management finds that land treatments in the southwestern United States are increasingly large, expensive and related to fire and invasive species control.The study, recently published in Restoration Ecology, reveals an extensive legacy of land management decisions and provides new insight on strategies to increase future treatment efficacy in an extremely water-limited region.
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Our photo contest is underway! 7.8.2017 Current Issue
A heat wave, staffing changes, and more dear friends.
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Death on the river 16.5.2017 Current Issue
As summer rafting season begins, safe passage to all river runners.
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Death on the river 16.5.2017 Current Issue
As summer rafting season begins, safe passage to all river runners.
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Death on the river 16.5.2017 Writers on the Range
As summer rafting season begins, safe passage to all river runners.
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Colorado County Funds College Scholarship With Marijuana Money 15.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
DENVER ― Budding scholars, rejoice. Commissioners in Pueblo County, Colorado, on Monday signed off on what they’re calling the “world’s first cannabis-funded scholarship.” The fund of approximately $475,000 will be available for high school students in Pueblo County who wish to attend Pueblo Community College or Colorado State University-Pueblo in fall 2017. Of that funding, about $425,000 comes from cannabis excise tax revenue, which is a one-time county-level tax on all marijuana grown in Pueblo County. A  state government-run scholarship program  makes up the remaining $49,664. Every qualifying high school graduate in the county should expect about $1,000 in aid this year, with more being awarded based on merit and need. PCC in-state tuition  is slightly more than $3,000 per year, while CSU-Pueblo can cost up to around $6,000 per year depending on the number of credit hours taken. County commissioner Sal Pace told local news outlet KKTV  he’s thrilled to see the money applied to something that can ...
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Naked in the desert 6.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The sunburned, imperfect and deeper wild of the human body.
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The Grand Canyon, like you’ve never seen it 6.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
An artist’s connection to the landscape through her paintings.
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New Study: Secrecy Around Composition of Oil Sands Dilbit Makes Effective Spill Response, Research Impossible 29.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Knowledge gaps about the behaviour of diluted bitumen when it is spilled into saltwater and lack of information about how to deal with multiple problems that can result from extracting and transporting bitumen from the Alberta oilsands, make it impossible for government or industry to come up with effective policies to deal with a disaster, says a newly published research paper,  Oilsands and the Marine Environment . The study by ecologists from Simon Fraser, Stanford, Oregon State and Northern Arizona universities, who scrutinized more than 9,000 research papers , concludes that officials should collect more information about the environmental effects of bitumen before setting regulations. "There just isn't enough science in the public eye to answer questions about the risk bitumen poses to the ocean," said lead author Stephanie Green, a Banting postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Ocean Solutions at Stanford University. "We found almost no research about bitumen's effects on marine species," ...
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Replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day isn’t enough 4.10.2016 Writers on the Range
To better honor their history, activists want “justice, not gestures.”
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Remember when NASA discovered flowing water on Mars? Turns out there might not be much of it 25.8.2016 Science / Technology News

Last year, the discovery of dark streaks in the sands of Mars during warmer months suggested NASA had found evidence of flowing liquid water on the barren world. But now, a new study from researchers at Northern Arizona University and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge is causing that theory to dry up.

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Meet the badasses bringing outdoor rec to the people that pioneered it 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
More groups are focused on getting Native Americans outside.
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The lost in canyon country 13.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A new book recounts the many mysterious disappearances in the Western desert.
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"Water Is Our Life": How a Mining Disaster Affected the Navajo Nation 16.5.2016 Truthout.com
Nearly a year ago, Environmental Protection Agency contractors accidentally released 3 million gallons of acid drainage from a Colorado mine, contaminating local rivers with hazardous metals and turning the waterways yellow. Just downstream, residents of the Navajo Nation continue to face threats to their health and livelihood. Wastewater from the Gold King Mine drains into retention ponds to eliminate contamination before it flows into the Animas River near Silverton, Colorado, August 15, 2015. (Photo: Mark Holm / The New York Times) In the midst of the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, it is not surprising that the World Health Organization recently released a report documenting that the environment is responsible for almost a quarter of deaths and disease in the world. But this is not news to the Diné (Navajo) people, who believe that all parts of nature -- the water, fish, trees and stars -- are equal members of society and are so intricately connected that an imbalance in one member may ...
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Northern Arizona U. Students Launch Sit-In as Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement Sweeps Country 29.4.2016 Democracy Now!
Students at Northern Arizona University, or NAU, are in the midst of a sit-in to call on their school to divest from fossil fuels. At least eight students have been arrested after they refused to leave a university building at closing time. Their protest is part of a national "Fossil Free" movement to pressure colleges to address the issue of climate change. For more, we’re joined by Michaela Mujica-Steiner, a senior at Northern Arizona University, and Karina Gonzalez, a graduate student in the NAU Forestry Department. Both were arrested during protests demanding fossil fuel divestment.
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'Neutral is Not Acceptable': Nationwide Protests Demand Colleges Go Fossil Free 28.4.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nika Knight, staff writer

A series of sit-ins and protests urging universities to divest their endowments from fossil fuels gained new strength this week, as students at the University of Montana, Vassar College, Northern Arizona University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison launched their own actions to combat climate change.

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These Are The Tools That Actually Teach Babies How To Talk 6.2.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This piece comes to us courtesy of EdSource , where it was originally published . If parents want to help their babies learn to talk, they need to ditch the chattering electronic toys and bring back the books and blocks. That’s the conclusion of Anna V. Sosa, an associate professor at Northern Arizona University, who conducted an experiment to determine whether the type of toy used during parent-child play influenced the quantity and quality of communications. Sosa gave parents simple board books, traditional toys such as blocks, puzzles and shape sorters, and battery-operated toys such as a talking farm and a baby laptop and cell phone. Sosa then asked the parents to play with their child at home for 15 minutes at a time, twice a day, for three days. During each playtime, the parents used one type of toy or book. The children, who ranged in age from 10 to 16 months, wore a vest with a recorder to record their interactions. At this age, the infants typically relied on baby talk, such as “gah,” or single ...
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One Dead, Three Wounded in Shooting at Northern Arizona University 9.10.2015 Truthout.com
A shooting outside an Arizona university dormitory early Friday left one person dead, three others wounded and the suspected shooter in custody, a school official said. The gunfire erupted in a parking lot at the Northern Arizona University, school public relations director Cindy Brown said. The lot is just outside Mountainview Hall dormitory at the northeast side of the Flagstaff campus, she added. Student Maria Gonzalez told The Associated Press that she at first suspected firecrackers. "I was studying for an exam so I looked out the window and see two people running, and that's when I realized they weren't fireworks they were actually gunshots," she said. The first police call about the gunfire came in at 1:20 a.m. PDT. Brown said she didn't know what caused the shooting and also didn't have any details about the suspect and victims, their conditions and whether they are students. On its website, the university said that the campus was stabilized and the campus was not on lockdown. "How am I supposed ...
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