User: flenvcenter Topic: Four Corners-Independent
Category: Four Corners Region
Last updated: Sep 17 2019 01:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 3,433    
Colorado farmers fight to save their water and their community’s future 16.9.2019 Current Issue
‘We can either wait on Mother Nature — or we can give it a shot ourselves.’
Also found in: [+]
A water ‘win-win’ in Colorado? Not so fast. 16.9.2019 Current Issue
A plan to export water from the San Luis Valley to the Denver Metro area is met with defiance.
Also found in: [+]
San Juan County ends legal fight against Voting Rights Act decision 2.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The first-ever Navajo majority commission halted a legal challenge to the ruling that ended discriminatory voting boundaries.
Also found in: [+]
Following public reaction, Edmonton Public Library drops plan to cut pages' wages 14.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! Acknowledging negative feedback received by Edmonton Public Library about its plan to reduce pay rates for youth pages in line with the United Conservative Party government's cuts to the minimum wage, EPL Chief Executive Officer Pilar Martinez said today the library would maintain current student pay rates. In an official statement published on the library system's website, Martinez said that while such changes would normally be part of bargaining for a new collective agreement with its staff union, EPL and the Civic Service Union 52 have struck a deal to keep the old wage rates in place. "Fortunately, EPL has not implemented this proposed change, and after further discussion, EPL and CSU 52 have come to an agreement to maintain current student page wages rates until negotiation of the new collective agreement is complete," the statement said. "As a result, there will ...
Also found in: [+]
Hiding behind UCP youth minimum wage cut, Edmonton Public Library slashes library pages' pay 13.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! Using the wording of its collective agreement with Civic Service Union 52 as an excuse, and the United Conservative government's minimum wage reduction for students under 18 as the trigger, Edmonton Public Library is handing its youth pages pay cuts of $2.30 to $2.50 per hour. This is pretty shameful for an institution whose mission is supposedly to cater to society's most vulnerable and which nurtures a public image as a major contributor to our regional community. But, gee, I guess the opportunity to squeeze its most vulnerable employees was just too much to resist when the Kenney government introduced its disgraceful $13-per-hour "youth minimum wage," a 13-per-cent pay cut of $2 from the $15-per-hour minimum wage instituted by the NDP. But the UCP's generous supporters in the fast-food industry -- a group that we expect to be more ruthless than public libraries -- ...
Also found in: [+]
Court throws book at BLM over fracking Chaco 3.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The agency failed to consider water use.
Also found in: [+]
WATCH: A message from the future with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez 23.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Best-of-the-net What if we actually pulled off a Green New Deal? What would the future look like? The Intercept presents a film narrated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and illustrated by Molly Crabapple. Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.  Support  rabble.ca today for as little as $1 per ...
Also found in: [+]
How the violence of white supremacy becomes white noise 19.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Azeezah Kanji In the Christchurch mosque massacre and its aftermath, two forms of racism have been put on display: a far-right Islamophobia that kills Muslims and a mainstream Islamophobia that normalizes the deaths. Initially, the mass killings barely made the front page of The Globe and Mail: the news was relegated to page four the first day after the atrocity, and the day following confined to a small black box at the top of the front page (which was dominated by a picture of Finance Minister Bill Morneau, not connected to any pressing news story). Even the car advertisement at the bottom was given more space on the front page than the planned and targeted gunning down of Muslims in prayer (the death toll at the time was 49 and has since risen to 50). While the shootings were allocated greater prominence in the paper following widespread criticism of The Globe's coverage, they have primarily been framed as a problem of gun control -- not the white supremacist ideology of the man wielding the ...
Also found in: [+]
Pundits keep scoffing, but progressive ideas keep winning 6.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Alex Cosh NDP leader Jagmeet Singh's victory in the Burnaby South byelection last week followed an increasingly familiar pattern in electoral politics. A few months ago, all the talk in the mainstream media was of Singh's inept leadership and a looming disaster for the NDP. Globe and Mail columnist Gary Mason called Singh's leadership a "washout." In the Ottawa Citizen, Andrew McDougall, Stephen Harper's former communications director, chuckled : "Singh features about as regularly as the third-choice goalie on a last-place NHL team" in conversations about the NDP. Liberal campaign strategist Omar Khan said Singh's leadership was "doomed in its infancy," and suggested, "Liberals are praying every night that the NDP doesn't dump him before the election." In the National Post, Rex Murphy described Singh as "natty but ineffectual." Former NDP leader Tom Mulcair, meanwhile, said it would be "extremely difficult" for Singh to stay on as leader if he lost in Burnaby. During the byelection, Tory candidate Jay ...
Also found in: [+]
America can afford a Green New Deal — here's how 6.3.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Implementing the GND seems expensive, but the costs of not addressing the climate and inequality are greater — and will only continue to grow.
Also found in: [+]
Environmental justice and the Green New Deal 1.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Jennifer Scarlott There are a number of ecosocialist responses to the Green New Deal, converging for the most part around the recognition that though it is not the Green New Deal most of us would prefer, it is the opportunity to move the paralysis of the climate change movement very far in the right -- left -- direction that our times so desperately need. This is a series of essays in six voices , from longtime activists who participate in the North American ecosocialist network System Change Not Climate Change . Each was challenged to make their point in 500 words or less. It was intended as a constructive contribution to the wonderful storm of discussion that the Green New Deal has opened up. Read the full series here . The Green New Deal, like some sort of eco-superhero, has arrived at the eleventh hour. Naomi Klein writes hopefully of it as a plan to address global warming that at long last matches the scale of the crisis. Klein (co-author of the Green New Deal-esque " Leap Manifesto ") has reason ...
Also found in: [+]
Why I support a Green New Deal, though it's just the start of what's needed 28.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Sandra Lindberg There are a number of ecosocialist responses to the Green New Deal, converging for the most part around the recognition that though it is not the Green New Deal most of us would prefer, it is the opportunity to move the paralysis of the climate change movement very far in the right -- left -- direction that our times so desperately need. This is a series of essays in six voices , from longtime activists who participate in the North American ecosocialist network System Change Not Climate Change . Each was challenged to make their point in 500 words or less. It was intended as a constructive contribution to the wonderful storm of discussion that the Green New Deal has opened up. Read the full series here . Donald Trump likes to use threats. He told Texans the Green New Deal means "they're coming for your money, and they're coming for your freedom." Fox News , too, warns the Green New Deal will "move the United States closer than ever to socialism," a system Trump equates with "corruption, ...
Also found in: [+]
How trafficking in Indigenous communities has been ignored under Trump 23.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In 2017, the Department of Justice canceled a landmark human trafficking study.
Also found in: [+]
Democrats are divided over the Green New Deal 14.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Can newly elected progressives convince party leaders to embrace a bold climate agenda?
Also found in: [+]
Welcome to Alberta, Mr. Trudeau, where if the premier's not happy, nobody's happy 6.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Welcome to Alberta where, as the prime minister of Canada no doubt discovered yesterday afternoon, if the premier ain't happy, ain't nobody happy! And, right now, the premier ain't happy! Old Alberta New Democrats have been familiar with this hurtin' refrain for some time. Don't jump to the conclusion that Justin Trudeau and much of the rest of the country aren't going to have to learn to sing along too. According to the CBC, Premier Rachel Notley was "visibly frosty" after she left her short meeting with Trudeau at Edmonton's Macdonald Hotel late yesterday afternoon, which had been called to discuss how to get the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project back on track now that a court has thrown a spanner in the works. Premier Notley wants the pipeline expansion, and she wants it now. And as I am sure the prime minister is learning to his chagrin, if he thought he could sweet talk Notley into signing back onto the federal government's climate plan before she has the pipeline her ...
Also found in: [+]
Trudeau Liberals call the opposition's bluff and 'nationalize' (sort of) the Trans Mountain pipeline 30.5.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga OK, so Ottawa's going to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5 billion and run it as a Crown corporation. That's a good start. (Caveats to follow.) Theoretically, it could ensure transparency and accountability, even responsibility, to a business in which the private sector adamantly refuses to deliver any such thing. Possibly, if there's an actual economic case for building a pipeline, it'll result in some of the line's profit remaining in Canada to benefit Canadians, for example by helping to develop cleaner alternative energy technologies, instead of being piped directly to the United States to line the pockets of The Richest Man in Houston* and his fellow Texans at Kinder Morgan Inc. As an aside, this raises the question of whether Ottawa is paying too much. That requires further analysis -- I'll get back to you about it sometime, maybe even before August when the deal is supposed to be done. In the meantime, though, I'm sure you'll have the opportunity to read a metric tonne ...
Also found in: [+]
Facebook Is Profiting From Illegal Wildlife Traffickers 16.4.2018 Truthout.com
Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. While Mark Zuckerberg was testifying before Congress about Facebook providing user information to  Cambridge Analytica , additional disturbing news about his company was making headlines. Facebook has been making a profit by selling ads on pages that are operated by illegal wildlife traffickers. The pages sell the body parts of endangered animals, according to a complaint filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). That's right, Facebook has allegedly been making money off of the sellers of items like elephant ivory, rhino horns and tiger teeth -- in fact, an  Associated Press  article included a screen grab of a Facebook group page displaying buckets full of the teeth. According to the complaint, Facebook is violating its responsibilities as a publicly-traded company by knowingly profiting from the criminal trafficking of endangered species. The anonymous whistleblower complaint was filed ...
Also found in: [+]
Big Brother Isn't Watching You: You're Watching Him! 27.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
President Trump speaks to guests during a Greek Independence Day celebration in the East Room of the White House, on March 22, 2018, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images) A record? Come on! Don't minimize what's happening. It's far too unique, too unprecedented even to be classified as "historic." Call it mega-historic, if you wish. Never from Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar to Soviet despot Joseph Stalin, from the Sun King Louis the XIV to President Ronald Reagan, from George Washington to Barack Obama, has anyone -- star, icon, personality, president, autocrat, emperor -- been covered in anything like this fashion. In our American world, the only comparison might be to a few days of media coverage of the assassination of John F. Kennedy or the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan or, in more recent times, a terror attack like the one in San Bernardino . Keep in mind, though, that such coverage has been going on for more than two and a half years now. So here's another possible point ...
Also found in: [+]
Naomi Wadler, 11: I Speak for Black Girls Victimized by Guns Whose Stories Don't Make the Front Page 26.3.2018 Truthout.com
Hundreds of thousands rallied for gun control in Washington, DC, Saturday for the March for Our Lives. The march was organized by survivors of last month's school shooting in Parkland, Florida. Speakers included 11-year-old Naomi Wadler of Alexandria, Virginia. TRANSCRIPT NAOMI WADLER: Hi. My name is Naomi, and I'm 11 years old. Me and my friend Carter led a walkout at our elementary school on the 14th. We walked out -- we walked out for 18 minutes, adding a minute to honor Courtlin Arrington, an African-American girl who was the victim of gun violence in her school in Alabama after the Parkland shooting. I am here today to represent Courtlin Arrington. I am here today to represent Hadiya Pendleton. I am here today to represent Taiyania Thompson, who, at just 16, was shot dead in her home here in Washington, D.C. I am here today to acknowledge and represent the African-American girls whose stories don't make the front page of every national newspaper, whose stories don't lead on the evening news. I ...
Also found in: [+]
Buried, Altered, Silenced: Four Ways Government Climate Information Has Changed Since Trump Took Office 22.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout delivers trustworthy reporting and thought-provoking news analysis. If you share our passion for the truth, help strengthen independent media with a donation today! After Donald Trump won the presidential election, hundreds of volunteers around the US came together to "rescue" federal data on climate change, thought to be at risk under the new administration. " Guerilla archivists ,"  including ourselves , gathered to archive federal websites and preserve scientific data. But what has happened since? Did the data vanish? As of one year later, there has been no great purge. Federal data sets related to environmental and climate science are still accessible in the same ways they were before Trump took office. However, in many other instances, federal agencies have tampered with information about climate change. Across agency websites, documents have disappeared, web pages have vanished and language has shifted in ways that appear to reflect the policies of the new administration. Two groups have ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 3,433