User: flenvcenter Topic: Four Corners-Independent
Category: Rivers
Last updated: Jul 06 2018 24:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump's family separation policy inflicts pain and fuels hate 5.7.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Summer days are long and hot in the Rio Grande Valley, the verdant flood plain that stretches 100 miles along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas, from McAllen to Brownsville. This is the epicentre of President Donald Trump's self-created immigrant family separation crisis, with at least 2,047 children torn from their parents' arms and imprisoned. The main child detention centre in Brownsville is in an old Walmart, its vast interior space filled now not with products manufactured by low-wage workers in distant foreign factories, but with 1,400 children penned inside of chain-link cages with Mylar sheets for comfort. Southwest Key, the nonprofit agency that runs this detention center, actually calls it Casa Padre, "Father's House," a painful reminder to so many children separated from their fathers. Detention of immigrant families has been happening for years and even accelerated under President Barack Obama. But, on May 7, the cruel triumvirate of Trump, his famously anti-immigrant adviser ...
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The Colorado River Basin: Where the reality of water stress collides with public policy 4.5.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The existing shortage isn't a short-term drought, it's the new long-term normal.
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Communities in US and Mexico at Risk From Sewage, Pollution and Disease 4.3.2018 Truthout.com
Thanks to reader support, Truthout can deliver the news seven days a week, 365 days a year. Keep independent journalism going strong: Make a tax-deductible donation right now. Imperial Beach, California -- U.S. Border Patrol Agent Christopher Harris steers his truck along the hilly road next to the border fence separating this beach community in the extreme southwest corner of the U.S. from Tijuana, Baja California's largest city. On a late November afternoon, Harris tours three different canyons along the border. At the bottom of each canyon, a ribbon of dark wastewater originates in Tijuana and flows into the wetlands of the Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge on its way to the Pacific Ocean. Drainage to Pacific Tijuana Slough. (Photo: John Dougherty) No one in the United States is certain whether the effluent is coming from Tijuana's failing wastewater-treatment system or if it is illegally dumped in the canyon creek beds in Tijuana. On this day, it flowed through dry creek beds, where Harris says ...
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To save our oceans, let’s start with our rivers 6.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Dams and pollution affect rivers across the West, to the detriment of our oceans.
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The uncompromising environmentalist behind the Sierra Club 5.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
A new book details the rise of the Sierra Club from hiking group to political force.
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A Southwest water dispute reaches the Supreme Court 23.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Why a fight over groundwater has left farmers in New Mexico feeling stranded.
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Utah is headed into a water battle it can’t win 23.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Why is this fiscally conservative state pushing an expensive diversion project?
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Traversing the mighty Colorado River 22.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
A writer sets out on a geographic journey to understand the imperiled water source.
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The tiny power plant that shapes the Colorado River — merely by existing 2.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The Shoshone power plant is the cornerstone for water rights in the upper river.
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The 26,000 tons of radioactive waste under Lake Powell 19.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The West’s uranium boom brought dozens of mills to the banks of the Colorado River — where toxic waste was dumped irresponsibly.
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We should recognize the legal rights of rivers 13.12.2017 Writers on the Range
No law gives a river a right to exist; at best, laws protect a river from harm caused by new development.
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Native Fish Species at Risk Following Water Removal from the Colorado River 12.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication in the journal PeerJ reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal portion of the Delta. 
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University of Oregon research maps major shifts in Colorado River history 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Geologists have long debated how and when the Colorado River made its first connection to the ocean. In a new study, a team led by the UO’s Becky Dorsey has helped pull the river’s story together.The river did not, as many thought, simply roar down out of the Colorado Plateau and pour into the Gulf of California.
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"Nature Has Rights": Activists Call for a Legal Transformation 10.11.2017 Truthout.com
The Colorado River runs through Grand Canyon National Park. (Photo: Jacalyn Engler ) A lawsuit filed in Denver district court by the Colorado River ecosystem asking to be recognized as a "person" is part of a growing global movement to forge a new kind of environmental law around the legal rights of nature. After all, if a corporation can be granted personhood, why not a river ecosystem that has sustained humans for thousands of years? The Colorado River runs through Grand Canyon National Park. (Photo: Jacalyn Engler ) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this one: We depend on reader support! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. The mighty Colorado River and its watersheds are a crucial source of life in the arid Southwest, supplying water to vast ecosystems and millions of people across seven states and northern Mexico. With so much depending on its existence, the Colorado River filed a groundbreaking lawsuit against the state of Colorado last month, demanding that its right to evolve, ...
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Advocating an expanded approach to collective action for water 18.10.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
It’s time to include more industry voices in the dialogue.
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Why a Colorado River reunion with the sea isn’t a guarantee 6.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
To revive a desiccated ecosystem, a U.S.-Mexico agreement looks past ‘pulse flows.’
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Group files suit to recognize the Colorado River as a person 27.9.2017 TreeHugger
Corporations have rights ... why not rivers?
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Latest: A setback for a Las Vegas pipeline 25.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Judge tells BLM to redo plans for compensating for wildlife habitat that would be lost to massive groundwater project.
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The fight to save vaquitas from extinction 23.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Through a tangle of corruption and overfishing, a marine species hangs in the balance.
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California water project could cramp Colorado River plan 22.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
If the Delta tunnels deal sinks, it could mean increased pressure on the already-strapped Colorado.
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