User: flenvcenter Topic: Four Corners-Independent
Category: Rivers
Last updated: Dec 13 2017 20:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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We should recognize the legal rights of rivers 13.12.2017 Writers on the Range
No law gives a river a right to exist; at best, laws protect a river from harm caused by new development.
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Native Fish Species at Risk Following Water Removal from the Colorado River 12.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication in the journal PeerJ reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal portion of the Delta. 
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University of Oregon research maps major shifts in Colorado River history 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Geologists have long debated how and when the Colorado River made its first connection to the ocean. In a new study, a team led by the UO’s Becky Dorsey has helped pull the river’s story together.The river did not, as many thought, simply roar down out of the Colorado Plateau and pour into the Gulf of California.
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"Nature Has Rights": Activists Call for a Legal Transformation 10.11.2017 Truthout.com
The Colorado River runs through Grand Canyon National Park. (Photo: Jacalyn Engler ) A lawsuit filed in Denver district court by the Colorado River ecosystem asking to be recognized as a "person" is part of a growing global movement to forge a new kind of environmental law around the legal rights of nature. After all, if a corporation can be granted personhood, why not a river ecosystem that has sustained humans for thousands of years? The Colorado River runs through Grand Canyon National Park. (Photo: Jacalyn Engler ) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this one: We depend on reader support! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. The mighty Colorado River and its watersheds are a crucial source of life in the arid Southwest, supplying water to vast ecosystems and millions of people across seven states and northern Mexico. With so much depending on its existence, the Colorado River filed a groundbreaking lawsuit against the state of Colorado last month, demanding that its right to evolve, ...
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Advocating an expanded approach to collective action for water 18.10.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
It’s time to include more industry voices in the dialogue.
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Why a Colorado River reunion with the sea isn’t a guarantee 6.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
To revive a desiccated ecosystem, a U.S.-Mexico agreement looks past ‘pulse flows.’
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Group files suit to recognize the Colorado River as a person 27.9.2017 TreeHugger
Corporations have rights ... why not rivers?
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Latest: A setback for a Las Vegas pipeline 25.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Judge tells BLM to redo plans for compensating for wildlife habitat that would be lost to massive groundwater project.
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The fight to save vaquitas from extinction 23.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Through a tangle of corruption and overfishing, a marine species hangs in the balance.
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California water project could cramp Colorado River plan 22.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
If the Delta tunnels deal sinks, it could mean increased pressure on the already-strapped Colorado.
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U.S. and Mexico agree to share a shrinking Colorado River 15.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The two nations are poised to sign an updated water pact to deal with drought.
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2 Facebook and Goldman alums-turned-founders share their best... 5.9.2017 Science / Technology News

Laura Lisowski Cox and Mia Saini Duchnowski are the founders of men's skincare company Oars+Alps. Oars+Alps is both of their first entrepreneurial venture, and they left full-time jobs to pursue it.

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Down with the Glen Canyon Dam? 4.9.2017 Current Issue
Activists claim that decommissioning the dam will save water and restore a wild canyon. Are they right?
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Money-for-water programs work — but for how long? 30.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Colorado River Basin, a pilot project wins over skeptical farmers and ranchers.
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There’s success in money-for-water programs — but for how long? 30.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Colorado River Basin, a pilot project wins over skeptical farmers and ranchers.
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How farmers can help keep salt out of the Colorado River 11.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The solution to a basin-wide problem may fall to individual irrigators.
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Denver to get more water from the Colorado River 27.7.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Colorado’s largest water supplier makes a big ask — and a bold promise — with demand for water.
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Climate change could disrupt tribes’ religious practices 7.7.2017 High Country News Most Recent
After years of religious persecution, tribes face changing natural world.
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How collaboration can save the Colorado River 22.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Different interests must align for a successful restoration.
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The Colorado River is shrinking because of climate change 15.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A long-term drought threatens Western cities’ water supplies.
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