User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Gardens
Last updated: Aug 26 2016 13:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Rich Kid’s Guide to Stocking a Million-Dollar Dorm 15.8.2016 Wired Top Stories
The Rich Kid’s Guide to Stocking a Million-Dollar Dorm
Just sold your second company to Facebook to focus on schoolwork? Great! Turn your dreary dorm room and its twin XL beds into the lap of on-campus luxury. The post The Rich Kid’s Guide to Stocking a Million-Dollar Dorm appeared first on WIRED.
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The Power Of Worm Poop 12.8.2016 NPR News
What comes out of the tail end of worms appears to be very good for crops.
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Friday Durango Dayplanner 12.8.2016 Durango Herald
Arts and EntertainmentThe Assortment, 6-9 p.m., Fox Fire Farms, 5513 County Road 321, Ignacio.Opening Reception, “Work time: Indigo Textiles” by Rowland Ricketts, 5-7 p.m., Durango Arts Center, 802 East Second Ave.,...
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Behold the eco-shed of the year finalists 11.8.2016 TreeHugger
Because "a man needs a shed."
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Wednesday Durango Dayplanner 10.8.2016 Durango Herald
Arts and EntertainmentCommunity Concerts in the Secret Garden featuring Gleewood, 5-7:30 p.m., Rochester Hotel Secret Garden, 726 East Second Ave., celebration for Jackie Snow, 5 p.m., Trinity Lutheran...
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Productive, Protein-Rich Breadfruit Could Help The World's Hungry Tropics 9.8.2016 NPR News
Packed with nutrients, easy to grow and adaptable to local cuisines, this tropical superfood could bring more food and cash to poor farmers around the world.
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This Former Gang Member Is Healing His Neighborhood Through Organic Gardening 9.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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Putting Food Waste To Work 8.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Food for the Hungry (FH) has been working for over 40 years in some of the world's harshest places, and we've seen a positive link between the responsible use and protection of the environment and the chances of a family breaking out of poverty. It's a simple truth: when we care for creation, we care for people. One of the creative ways we've been working to use earth's resources to help solve hunger and poverty for families, capitalizes on something we all have far too much of -waste. We've developed a project called keyhole gardens which puts waste to work. It's a common story around the world, a woman is widowed and left alone with children to feed. "It has been very difficult to face life without my husband," said Dona Rutilia, one of these widowed mothers, told our staff in Guatemala. With no knowledge of sustainable agriculture, she couldn't adequately feed her two young children. FH taught her how to grow a keyhole garden, a small, elevated kitchen garden that looks like a keyhole. This small plot ...
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What's new in Michael McCarty's garden of California cuisine: Miles Thompson takes over as chef 6.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Chef musical chairs is a fast-moving game, so it can be easy to lose track of just who’s cooking where, especially these days, when the restaurants themselves are often as migratory as the people in the kitchen. Some chefs and some restaurants, though, are worth tracking, particularly when the juxtaposition...

Want to Fight Food Waste? Get with the Food System 5.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Above: Students working in the Field and Fork Student Gardens at the University of Florida. Part of creating a sustainable food culture is appreciating the labor and resources that go into food production. UF/IFAS Photo by Amy Stuart At the University of Florida's Innovation Academy, students are challenged to come up with creative, inventive solutions to some of our toughest problems. This year, the freshman class was tasked with developing a business concept or invention that responded to the issue of food waste. As the campus food system coordinator and part of the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, I was invited to talk to some of these students about their ideas and probe their thinking. Needless to say, this was a group of very smart, very talented young people. But as I listened to them talk about their ideas, I began to notice a trend that worried me. It's not that their ideas were unrealistic. For example, one student proposed a composting device people could install in their homes ...
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Put a farm in your kitchen. A nanofarm, that is. 4.8.2016 TreeHugger
Replantable aims to be a hands-off modular indoor growing device for fresh homegrown produce, year-round.
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Colorado Master Gardeners: Plants need companions too
 3.8.2016 Steamboat Pilot
whatscookingamerica.net/edibleflowers/edibleflowersmain.htm That vision has stuck with me, helping me tap into the age-old wisdom of gardening when it comes time to plant. Whether I’m working on extending our beautiful perennial garden or just planting seasonal vegetables in raised beds, all plants needs companions, just as we do. And just as with humans, some plants thrive with the right companions, while others simply don’t like each other. Through the years, I’ve found it’s better to know in advance than to find out afterwards that my plants just didn’t get along. The topic of companion planting has spawned much debate, and many experts reject the idea, entirely. However, much practical application, research and experience is written on the subject, and reasons to be on your game with companion planting are extensive. Successful plant pairings can aid in pest control, growth, pollination, habitat and maximizing space and resources. Following are a few companions I use; I urge you to start your own ...
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Fruit matters: How a day camp connects kids to their cultures and community 3.8.2016 Seattle Times: Local

At Fruit Science Summer Camp in Rainier Beach, kids learn why spiders are helpful, how to make ice cream, and how they can connect to the land.
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How to make an instant garden. From trash. 2.8.2016 TreeHugger
Permaculture expert Geoff Lawton explains the basics how to make an instant, no-till raised bed using sheet mulching.
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Community Garden Transformation Competition 2016 1.8.2016 Planet Ark News
A huge congratulations to the Community Verge Rejuvenation Projects for winning our Garden makeover competition. We look forward to seeing how the verge transformation brings the native wildlife and locals together.
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Tennis legend Pete Sampras puts his Brentwood home in play for $8.9 million 30.7.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Tennis legend Pete Sampras and his wife, actress-singer Bridgette Wilson-Sampras, have served up their home in Brentwood, listing the scenic estate for sale at $8.9 million.

The couple bought the gated home new in 2009 for $5.9 million and renovated and expanded the home, customizing the interiors...

San Diego looks to establish technology hub 30.7.2016 SFGate: Business & Technology
The project, known as Makers Quarter, aims to turn six blocks of mixed-use development into 1 million square feet of office space, 145,000 square feet of street-level retail space, 800 residential units and 72,000 square feet of public open space over the next seven to 10 years. Planners want to expand on the identity of the neighborhood, defined by artists and artisans, and attract and retain a robust talent pool for the innovation economy. Stacey Pennington, the master planner on the project, described the vision for the neighborhood from a picnic table at Silo, an auto repair lot that has been turned into a community venue. In their planning, Pennington and her team — including artist Christopher Konecki; Matt Carlson from the real estate firm CBRE; and Ron Troyano, event manager for Silo — used ideas from tactical urbanism, a movement in which residents and communities try out temporary projects. A pilot program to reduce vehicular traffic in that part of Manhattan was such a hit that the plazas ...
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Refugee nonprofit partners with DeLaney Community Farms for food share 29.7.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Sung Ei knelt among the thriving rows of Swiss Chard and blooming beets under the hot sun at DeLaney Community Farms and pointed to the drip irrigation line that wound along the ground, nourishing the vegetables. “Growing food here is a lot different than back home,” Ei, 36, said through a translator on a recent […]
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Want more dahlias than you’ll know what to do with? Use this fertilizer combination 28.7.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Mixing alfalfa meal and organic flower food to fertilize your dahlias will probably mean you’ll need to buy more vases for all the bouquets you’ll be cutting.
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Sowing Hope In Syria's Besieged Communities 27.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In Syria’s besieged areas, civilians are planting their own urban gardens to make up for the lack of humanitarian aid and exorbitant cost of black-market food. BEIRUT – In Madaya, a mountain village nestled between Damascus and the Syrian-Lebanese border, window sills used to blossom with roses, jasmine, and the scented geraniums that people might once have used to flavor a delicate syrup for sweets. But now, instead of flowers, the windows are overflowing with cucumbers, tomatoes and zucchini. People from Madaya have always farmed on the hillside that slopes down toward the valley. But one year ago, government forces took back the strategic border town of Zabadani, a key supply point between Syria and Lebanon, in the valley below the village. Since then, Madaya has been under siege by the Syrian government and its ally, the Lebanese Shiite militia Hezbollah; the village’s farmers can no longer access their fields. “We’ve been farmers from the first day,” says Abu Khalil, nom de guerre of a civil ...
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21 to 40 of 6,105