User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Gardens
Last updated: Mar 31 2015 20:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Learn to make ollas, more in water workshop for gardeners 13.3.2015 LA Times: Opinion
As spring nears, it’s vital that gardeners start to anticipate their water needs over the next few seasons. The Los Angeles Community Garden Council is sponsoring free public water workshops at community gardens and farmers markets. 
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Beekeepers Are Skeptical About That 'Revolutionary' IndieGoGo Flow Hive 12.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Flow Hive recently set the Internet abuzz with its promise of simplifying the honey-harvesting process, but some experts are speaking out about the product, with one even calling it an "expensive gimmick." The product, which allows beekeepers to extract honey from a hive by turning on a tap , has so far raised more than $5.7 million on crowdfunding site IndieGoGo. Yahoo reported the Flow Hive is the "largest international campaign ever on Indiegogo " and had raised $2.1 million in one day, far exceeding its $70,000 goal. Over 1,000 backers have donated $600, an amount that promises them a full hive in return. In a video on the site, father-and-son team Cedar and Stuart Anderson explain the Flow Hive will free beekeepers from the laborious process of harvesting honey. Apiary experts and casual beekeepers appear onscreen rhapsodizing about how the Flow Hive will "revolutionize" beekeeping. But American apiarists told The Huffington Post the Flow Hive is overpriced and that the promotional video ...
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Here Are The Best 10 Cities To Live In If You Love Wildlife 12.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Do you live in one of the most wildlife-friendly cities in the country? A new list from the National Wildlife Federation ranks U.S. cities with the most park area and citizen engagement for protecting wildlife. "The common thread between these cities is that citizens are coming together for a common purpose -- to create a community where people and wildlife can thrive," NWF president and CEO Collin O’Mara said in a news release. The rankings were determined by comparing the percentage of parkland in each city, each city's number of NWF Certified Wildlife Habitats per capita, and the number of schools per capita participating in two NWF outdoor learning programs . NWF's Certified Wildlife Habitat program allows people to register their gardens or areas of their property as suitable places for animals. Along with proper food and water sources, the habitats must provide cover and places for wildlife to raise their young. Owners must also make use of sustainable gardening practices. Honorable Mention: ...
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Marla Spivak: To grasp our bees' plight and prospects, stay focused on food 11.3.2015 MinnPost
As I listened to Marla Spivak discuss the plight and prospects of our honeybees on Monday evening, it occurred to me that I was watching a masterful application of Albert Einstein’s principle that complex matters should be made as simple as possible – but not simpler. Most of us have grasped by now that honeybees are under pressure from multiple sources, with certain insecticides, habitat loss, parasites and disease in the leading roles. But great argument continues over how to weigh their contributions: Commercial beekeepers assign most of the blame to neoicotinoid insecticides, a new type of systemic bug-killer whose surge in U.S. market share roughly coincided with the appearance of hive-emptying “colony collapse disorder” in 2006. Neonics’ manufacturers, vendors and applicators of course want to fix the fault elsewhere, and typically prefer the parasitic varroa mites – a problem, after all, that can be addressed by buying and applying a miticide. Many an entomologist and environmentalist emphasizes ...
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These modular urban gardening growbeds water themselves 11.3.2015 TreeHugger
If you'd like to get started growing some of your own food, but you don't have a lot of room or a lot of time, these wicking beds might help you quickly sprout a garden.
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Nature's Do-Gooders: What Difference Do They Make? 11.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Last week I assembled a group of nature "do-gooders" at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center in Annapolis MD. And I asked them what difference their well-intended actions really make. First off, you might want to know who these do-gooders are. One is Veronica Kyle of Faith in Place in Chicago, who links stories of African-American migration to migration of the monarch butterfly, and inspires folks to plant milkweed in public spaces to "welcome home" the butterflies. Another is Robert Hughes , who for 20 years has spurred people in his native eastern Pennsylvania coalfields to plant trees along stream corridors, clean up illegally dumped trash, create community gardens at historic mining sites, restore trout fisheries, and otherwise reclaim communities impacted by coal mining and poverty. Anandi Premlall came down to our workshop from New York City, where she initiated efforts to convert a 3.5 mile disused rail line to what someday will be The QueensWay linear park and cultural greenway. And ...
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Derek Zoolander and Hansel Make a Comeback 10.3.2015 NYT: Home Page
Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson revived their “Zoolander” characters at Paris Fashion Week.
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I had some trees that needed to come down so I hired horse loggers. It was amazing. 9.3.2015 MinnPost
Wednesday morning This morning I shoveled snow from in front of the garden gate. The little fenced vegetable plot will be home for a pair of Percherons for the next couple of days. Jacob Obletz, our logger, assures me they’ll be plenty warm in their thick coats, and happy to respect the flimsy fence as long as they have plenty of hay to eat. I’m looking out the windows, trying to imagine how things will look different without the tall old popples with their skeleton branches reaching to the sky. I call them popples; they’re aspens. For me, “popple” is a derogatory term, a put-down of this weed that grows everywhere in our part of the world. They sprang up in the clear-cuts left after loggers cut down the tall pines that graced northeastern Minnesota at the turn of the 20th century . They’ve been growing here ever since. That’s because loggers keep cutting them down and taking them to paper mills and oriented strand board mills, every 30 to 40 years when they get big enough. Very few stands are allowed to ...
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African Women Turn Once-Devastating Floodwaters Into Gardens 9.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Emilie Faye is no stranger to flooding. The walls in her home are discolored from rainwater and past floods in her community, a suburb of Dakar, Senegal, have driven water levels up to the seat of her couch, she told Reuters. But the Senegalese woman is now using the results of devastating natural disasters to build her entrepreneurial skills. Faye has taken a leading role in the "Live With Water" project -- an initiative that grows crops from trapped excess water when the region floods -- as Reuters reported. According to Faye, she and her daughter make about $22 a month from selling crops grown in the basins, like basil and mint. She said that money goes toward school fees and medical supplies. "Before, one had to accept that houses here flood," Faye told Reuters. "But this project opened our eyes to see there is a solution ." Her city, Pikine, has benefited from a water system produced by architecture company Mandu. The firm helped implement a surface drainage system that empties and filtrates ...
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Community solar is hot stuff 8.3.2015 Durango Herald
MINNEAPOLIS – A new concept in renewable energy is catching fire across the country, allowing customers who might find solar panels too expensive or impractical to buy green energy anyway.Community solar gardens first took off in Colorado a few years ago, and the model – also known as community or shared solar – has...
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New concept in solar energy poised to catch on across US 7.3.2015 Yahoo: US National
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A new concept in renewable energy is catching fire across the country, allowing customers who might find solar panels too expensive or impractical to buy green energy ...
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New concept in renewable energy, community solar gardens, poised to catch on across US 7.3.2015 Star Tribune: Business
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New concept in solar energy poised to catch on across US 7.3.2015 AP Business
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- A new concept in renewable energy is catching fire across the country, allowing customers who might find solar panels too expensive or impractical to buy green energy anyway....
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Dakar women grow herb business from floodwater: TRFN 6.3.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Kathryn M. Werntz DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Though the coastal cities of Senegal are situated on the fierce Atlantic Ocean, it is floods from heavy rains they struggle with, rather than rising tides. In Pikine, a suburb of Senegal's capital Dakar, the "Live with Water" project captures floodwater in large sandy basins, around which cash crop gardens of mint and basil provide an income for local residents.
Xcel asks for changes in solar garden rules 6.3.2015 Star Tribune: Business
Xcel Energy says many proposed community solar projects are so big that they should be competitively bid.
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Local Briefs 5.3.2015 Durango Herald
Julie Westendorff to hold office hours La Plata County Commissioner Julie Westendorff will hold office hours to meet with residents from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday at the Pine River Library Conference Room, 395 Bayfield Center Drive, in Bayfield.Westendorff invites Bayfield-area residents to stop by to discuss their interests and...
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David Eskenazy named president of Merrill Gardens 2.3.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Notable hires and promotions.
Why I Returned to the TEDx Stage to Talk About Climate Change 27.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Why I Returned To The TED Stage- TEDxZwolle- Climate, Activity, Cities After delivering my first TEDx presentation at the O2 in London last October at the amazing TEDxTeen event I did not envisage that I would be returning to that prestigious stage so soon. After watching my "game-changing" presentation on how to talk about climate change organisers of TEDxZwolle invited me to talk some more. In my first TEDx talk I asked the question "What is the first word you think of when you hear climate change?" My top 3 guesses at your answer would be Carbon Dioxide, Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming. Am I right?.. Climate change has been communicated in the wrong way. For me and many people that I've talked to in my 10 years of climate change work the topic has become scientific and far-removed from everyday life- the most common words used to talk about it show this. We need to change the conversations we have about climate change and talk about it as a topic which is affecting our everyday lives. Talk ...
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Alaska Farmer Turns Icy Patch Of Tundra Into A Breadbasket 27.2.2015 NPR Health Science
Warmer temperatures in Alaska are giving farmers flexibility to plant a wider range of crops over a longer growing season. One farmer says the secret to his bounty is soil enriched by flooding rivers.
Ready to garden? Go indoors 25.2.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
If you're missing your garden and its fresh-picked goodness, why wait? Just about anyone can produce a few fresh edibles, even in the dead of a Minnesota winter.
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