User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Industrial Agriculture
Last updated: Feb 28 2015 20:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Chips a must along Arizona's Salsa Trail 28.2.2015 LA Times: Opinion
The closer you get to the border, the more passionate people become about Mexican food. In southeastern Arizona's Graham County, where tomatoes and peppers grow in abundance, folks are downright competitive about their salsa. A dozen mom-and-pop restaurants in Graham County, about three hours...
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Agricultural insecticides pose a global risk to surface water bodies 26.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Streams within approximately 40% of the global land surface are at risk from the application of insecticides. These were the results from the first global map to be modeled on insecticide runoff to surface waters, which has just been published in the journal Environmental Pollution by researchers from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the University of Koblenz-Landau together with the University of Milan, Aarhus University and Aachen University. According to the publication, particularly streams in the Mediterranean, the USA, Central America and Southeast Asia are at risk.
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Everything You Wanted to Know About the Bee Die-Off 26.2.2015 Truthout.com
Bees still are dying in larger-than-average numbers in North America, Europe, parts of Asia and elsewhere. We're still not sure why. The debate over neonicotinoid pesticides, especially, continues to be heated. But beekeepers and bee researchers generally agree that it's not just one thing killing the bees. In reality, some combination of the four P's is the culprit: parasites, pathogens, poor nutrition and pesticides.   This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting . For years, honeybees were dying, and no one knew why. There have been some glimmers of hope recently. The number of bee deaths wasn't as dramatic last winter. Studies began pointing the finger at pesticides. But a simple fact remains: Bees still are on the decline, and no one's sure why. They're dying in large numbers, and scientists are scrambling to identify the cause. Beekeepers used to see about 5 or 10 percent of the bees in their hives die every year, but starting in 2006, losses jumped to ...
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Want to avoid toxins on your food? Shop the “Clean Fifteen” 26.2.2015 TreeHugger
This list can help you avoid pesticides without only eating organic.
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Apples Top Dirty Dozen List for Fifth Year in a Row 25.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Eat at Your Own Risk: Flawed FDA Risk Assessments Strengthen Arguments for Labeling GMOs 25.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) Recent congressional testimony by the former director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Michael Landa, is a reminder that the Food and Drug Administration's risk assessment process for genetically engineered products lacks transparency and allows industries to self-regulate. Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can’t be found in corporate media! Make a tax-deductible donation today. For the past two decades, developers of genetically engineered (GE) crops and their corporate allies have maintained that because their products are so obviously safe, there is no need to label them. Thanks to marketing campaigns , squelched state initiatives and a flood of GE products on the market, the public has largely adopted this belief as well.   Would it shock the public to know that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has never formally approved any GE crop as safe for human consumption? Instead, these companies have been trusted to ...
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Amplifyd.com Challenges Starbucks and Peet's Coffee to Use Organic Milk 24.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo courtesy of Stonyfield Organic. As a DIVA, once I learned where the milk is sourced from at my local Starbucks and Peet's Coffee, I decided to to search for a new coffee joint that serves organic milk in their lattes. Diva, or not, you too deserve safe milk in your delicious, over-priced coffee drink! These coffee giants both purchase milk from large, industrialized farms who feed their cows a diet comprised of genetically modified corn, soy, alfalfa and cotton seed. Plus, a high dose of antibiotics. Non-organic livestock production is responsible for 80% of all antibiotic use in the world, and the dairy industry in particular, uses the strongest and most dangerous forms. As an example, a super potent antibiotic drug used by commercial dairy farmers called Ceftiofur creates resistant bacteria after only one dose. Scott Blankenship, founder and CEO of www.amplifydpledges.com , a social activism startup based in Berkeley, California, is concerned about the health risks. "Most people are aware that ...
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Is grass-fed beef really better for you, the animal and the planet? 23.2.2015 Washington Post
Grass-fed beef is the meat of the moment. The image of cattle dotting green hillsides is an appealing counterpoint to the thought of herds corralled in crowded, grass-free feedlots. Advocates claim a trifecta of advantages: Grass-fed beef is better for you, for the animal and for the planet.Read full article >>
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Should We Experiment With Climate Geoengineering? 23.2.2015 Truthout.com
The US National Academy of Sciences announced its long-awaited reports on climate geoengineering in mid-February. The reports intelligently state at the outset that geoengineering is no substitute for reducing emissions. But the call for experimentation and research - and for federal government funding for it - is pervasive, loud and clear. And worrisome. A similar call for research was published as a commentary in Nature. Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can't be found in corporate media! Make a tax-deductible donation today. The US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) announced its long-awaited reports on climate geoengineering in mid-February. The reports intelligently state at the outset that geoengineering is no substitute for reducing emissions. But the call for experimentation and research - and for federal government funding for it - is pervasive, loud and clear. And worrisome. A similar call for research was published as a commentary in Nature, conveniently timed just a few ...
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Will Richmond Reject Roundup? The Case for Banning Glyphosate 23.2.2015 Truthout.com
Richmond, California. (Photo: Wikipedia ; Edited: JR/TO) On Tuesday, the Richmond, California, City Council will consider banning the use of all pesticides by city employees and contractors to protect its residents' health from glyphosate, key ingredient in Monstanto's Roundup, which has been shown to cause fetal deaths and birth defects in animals and DNA damage in humans. Richmond, California. (Photo: Wikipedia ; Edited: JR/TO) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout and fund more stories like it! In July of 2012, the city of Richmond, California, adopted an Integrated Pest Management Ordinance to guide the work of city departments tasked with weed and pest control. The ordinance championed Integrated Pest Management (IMP) as the solution of choice. Pesticide use is to be considered only after all other means of control have failed. The ordinance states : "Pesticides shall be used only as a last resort ...
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The 10 American Cities Most Obsessed With Eating Organic Food 23.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Philadelphia, PA Washington, D.C. Investigators combined the findings of original research and existing related research and data on this topic to find the most popular cities for organic eating. The data was based on metrics related to consumers' preferences for organic foods. A poll conducted on Sperling’s Best Places website, which yielded 6,500 responses from participants across the U.S. in three days, was included, as well as Yelp results for "Organic Grocery Stores" and "Organic Restaurants," local farmers' markets and community supported agriculture groups (CSAs), and consumers' buying habits at the grocery store. So what exactly does "organic" mean , besides more expensive? The USDA National Organic Program (NOP) defines organic as food that is "produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations." One hundred percent organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products are produced from animals ...
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Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution 22.2.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Krishna N. Das and Mayank Bhardwaj NEW DELHI (Reuters) - On a fenced plot not far from Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's home, a field of mustard is in full yellow bloom, representing his government's reversal of an effective ban on field trials of genetically modified (GM) food crops. The GM mustard planted in the half-acre field in the grounds of the Indian Agricultural Research Institute in New Delhi is in the final stage of trials before the variety is allowed to be sold commercially, and that could come within two years, scientists associated with the project say. India placed a moratorium on GM aubergine in 2010 fearing the effect on food safety and biodiversity. Field trials of other GM crops were not formally halted, but the regulatory system was brought to a ...
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Minnesota history: Cargill has humble roots — in Iowa and Wisconsin 22.2.2015 Star Tribune: Local
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A Factory Farmer Strikes Back at the Company He Farms For 19.2.2015 Wired Top Stories
Back in December I wrote about a chicken farmer who took the extraordinary step of inviting animal-welfare activists into his barns to document the conditions under which his contract compels him to raise his birds. The farmer, Craig Watts of North Carolina, has raised chicken for Perdue Farms for two decades and has often been ...
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Despite Corporations Trying to Silence Our Voices, A New Wave of Democracy 18.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Big Ag’s Fight for Twitter Credibility 18.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Ractopamine: It's What's for Dinner 18.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
China and Russia aren't known as leaders on food safety or animal welfare, yet there's one drug that even they--along with much of the world, including the European Union--won't allow to be fed to animals destined for the plate: ractopamine . This growth-promoting drug has left thousands of pigs lame, in intense pain, downed, and even dead. The United States isn't taking the drug off the market, and instead is dismissing the data about animal welfare problems and expanding its use. Beef producers are switching in droves to the dangerous growth promoter because they've been blocked by others within their industry from using an equally dangerous and powerful-acting drug. Fortune's Deena Shanker reported last week that beef cattle feedlot operators have been stung by the refusal of Tyson and Cargill to accept cattle at their slaughterhouses doped up with the growth promoting drug Zilmax (a drug similar to ractopamine), after reports that it caused cattle to arrive at slaughterhouses "hoofless" and in severe ...
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A New Wave of Democracy, and How Corporations Are Trying to Silence Your Voice and Your Choice 18.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
President's Day is an appropriate time to reflect on the state of our U.S. democracy. And there is some very good news across the country about the spread of local democracy, but you have not heard or read much about it in the mainstream media. Remarkably, this democratic surge has taken place despite the massive influx of corporate dollars from those who want to stomp out popular rule as it threatens their power and profits. But more about them later. Let's start with the big positive. Too often democracy has meant voting every couple of years for a candidate that is "the lesser of two evils." But now, citizens and their representatives all across the country are voting directly on major social and technology issues that impact their families and neighborhoods. Often, they are saying no to technologies that will poison their water, destroy their land and biodiversity and threaten the health of their children and communities. One example is the issue of genetically engineered (GE) crops and foods. More ...
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Water, air quality concerns heighten conflict with pig farms 16.2.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Modern meat production, in which thousands of animals are packed into barns for concentrated feeding operations, has proven to be efficient and profitable, but comes with its own set of ...
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Water, air quality concerns heighten conflict between pig farms and environmental advocates 16.2.2015 Star Tribune: Business
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