User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Industrial Agriculture
Last updated: May 27 2015 06:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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New research helps farmers set targets for reducing emissions 27.5.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Eileen McLellan Credit: photos.com The easiest way to tackle fertilizer pollution is to lower the amount of nitrogen applied to crops , thereby reducing nutrient losses into the air and water. The problem is, reducing fertilizer rates can also shrink crop yields, which means less income for farmers and less food on our plates. So here’s the question: how can we slash nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture without sacrificing productivity? To meet this challenge, scientists need to understand the relationship between “nitrogen surplus” (the amount of applied nitrogen fertilizer not taken up by the plant), “nutrient use efficiency” (the ratio of how much yield you get from each pound of fertilizer applied) and nitrous oxide emissions that contribute to climate change. The more nitrogen a plant absorbs, the less it releases into the air in the form of nitrous oxide and into the water where it can contribute to harmful algal blooms . Until now, the only option for farmers wanting to reduce nitrous oxide ...
Think Rabbit Is The 'New Ethical Meat'? Think Again. 26.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The nation's largest rabbit slaughterhouse claims it has changed its practices in response to an animal rights group’s recent undercover investigation, but the group’s findings nevertheless cast doubt on the idea that consuming rabbit is a more “ethical” choice than eating other types of meat. The Investigation Earlier this month, the nonprofit organization Last Chance For Animals released the findings of its four-week undercover investigation into Pel-Freez Foods , a rabbit processor in Rogers, Arkansas. To conduct the investigation, an LCA employee, whom the group identifies under the pseudonym “Sheila” for privacy reasons, took a job with Pel-Freez collecting blood from rabbits after they were killed -- to be sold later for medical research. While on the job, Sheila secretly filmed the slaughtering process. Nina Hauptman, LCA's director of campaigns, told The Huffington Post that what Sheila caught on tape amounts to “horrific cruelty.” In the footage, workers can be seen attempting to stun the ...
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Save the World's Small-Scale Farmers 26.5.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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'No More Poison': World Unites for Annual #MarchAgainstMonsanto 24.5.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Protesters call for mandatory GMO labeling 24.5.2015 Philly.com News
People saying they are concerned about the health and environmental implications of food made with genetically modified organisms gathered Saturday afternoon in Center City for a rally and march calling for mandatory labeling of "GMO foods."
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Why the Food Movement Must Build Power 21.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Mark Bittman's recent op-ed on the faults of the food movement provides a great opportunity to discuss how we should be engaging politically to demand a better food system; unfortunately, it misses the mark on why we are making limited progress on food policy issues. While it's refreshing to hear a food luminary acknowledge the importance of organizing, as a long time organizer, it's frustrating to me that he never addresses the fact that winning means building political power. His piece also criticizes the large segment of the movement that has begun to build that political power on labeling GMO foods. This is not a recipe for success. First off, Bittman questions if there is a food movement. But from the large number of national, state and local organizations and tens of thousands of individuals who are interested in a range of food related issues, it's clear there is a movement. The real challenge has been translating that movement into building political power. For the most part, food activism has ...
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ConAgra agrees to pay $11.2M in salmonella case 21.5.2015 Philly.com News
SAVANNAH, Ga. - ConAgra Foods agreed Wednesday to pay $11.2 million, a sum that includes the highest criminal fine ever in a U.S. food-safety case, to settle a federal charge that the company shipped Peter Pan peanut butter tainted with salmonella from a plant in Georgia, sickening more than 600 people and triggering a massive recall eight years ago.
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Internet of Farm Things 21.5.2015 Technology Review Feed - Tech Review Top Stories

Companies are competing to turn data into advice on how to farm better, and attracting investments from the likes of Google Ventures and Monsanto.

For more on how technology is changing food, please read our upcoming Business Report, High-Tech Food Chain, this coming Tuesday.

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5,000 Cooks and Cashiers Wage Largest-Ever Protest at McDonald’s Shareholder Meeting 21.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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ConAgra Foods To Face Criminal Charge For 2007 Peanut Butter Recall 21.5.2015 NPR: All Things Considered
A subsidiary of ConAgra Foods is poised to plead guilty to a criminal charge and pay the largest-ever criminal fine in a food safety case after an outbreak in its peanut butter sickened at least 625 people in 47 states.
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Decrying Corporate Greed, McDonald's Cooks and Cashiers Confront Shareholders 20.5.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Why President Obama’s Pollinator Strategy Won’t Solve Bee Crisis 20.5.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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ConAgra to pay $11.2M to settle salmonella criminal case 20.5.2015 Yahoo: US National
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — ConAgra Foods agreed Wednesday to pay $11.2 million to settle a federal criminal charge that the company shipped Peter Pan peanut butter tainted with salmonella from a plant in Georgia more than eight years ago, triggering a massive recall and food-safety investigation after more than 600 people got sick.
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The Silencing of Hector Valenzuela 20.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
As the University of Hawai'i was cozying up to GMO giant Monsanto, one of the school's professors says that he was forced to tolerate a climate of "bigotry, retaliation and hostility" for speaking out about the potential risks of genetic engineering. The university disputes his charges. But Dr. Hector Valenzuela is not the only professor at the university who has been harassed for voicing concerns about biotechnology. University of Hawai'i Prof. Hector Valenzuela conducted experiments on organic farming at the university's Waimanalo Experiment Station on Oahu until the university shut down his research. (Photo: Will Caron) Truthout combats corporate power by bringing you trustworthy, independent news. Join our mission by making a donation now! As the University of Hawai‘i was cozying up to GMO giant Monsanto, one of the school’s professors says that he was forced to tolerate a climate of “bigotry, retaliation and hostility” for speaking out about the potential risks of genetic engineering. The university ...
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ConAgra to pay $11.2M to settle salmonella criminal case 20.5.2015 AP Business
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) -- ConAgra Foods agreed Wednesday to pay $11.2 million to settle a federal criminal charge that the company shipped Peter Pan peanut butter tainted with salmonella from a plant in Georgia more than eight years ago, triggering a massive recall and food-safety investigation after more than 600 people got sick....
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Monsanto's Worst Fear May Be Coming True 20.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
A chicken salad from Chipotle grill. (Photo: Elvert Barnes ) Want to challenge injustice and make real change happen? That’s Truthout’s goal - support our work with a donation today! The decision of the Chipotle restaurant chain to make its product lines GMO-free is not most people’s idea of a world-historic event. Especially since Chipotle, by US standards, is not a huge operation. A clear sign that the move is significant, however, is that Chipotle’s decision was met with a tidal-wave of establishment media abuse. Chipotle has been called irresponsible, anti-science, irrational, and much more by the Washington Post , Time Magazine , the Chicago Tribune , the LA Times , and many others. A business deciding to give consumers what they want was surely never so contentious. The media lynching of Chipotle has an explanation that is important to the future of GMOs. The cause of it is that there has long been an incipient crack in the solid public front that the food industry has presented on the GMO issue. ...
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If we're going to eat cattle, let them eat grass 20.5.2015 LA Times: Opinion
Stories about impending environmental apocalypse circulate almost daily, especially in drought-ravaged California. Many of these stories tend to blame agriculture — and specifically, beef — for gobbling up our resources. Though numbers vary widely and are hotly contested, some researchers estimate...
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Pollinator Politics: Environmentalists Criticize Obama Plan To Save Bees 20.5.2015 NPR Health Science
The White House's new plan to reverse dramatic declines in bee numbers calls for the restoration of 7 million acres of bee-friendly habitat. Critics say the plan ignores a key culprit: pesticides.
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White House issues plan to save bees, other crop pollinators 20.5.2015 LA Times: Business
The federal government will boost research and preserve 7 million acres of habitat for bees, monarch butterflies and other insects as part of a wide-ranging strategy to bolster the population of pollinators that are vital to the nation's food crops.
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US investigation of 2007 peanut butter recall wraps up 20.5.2015 Health
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — ConAgra Foods is likely to face a criminal charge now that the U.S. government has completed its investigation of the company's 2007 peanut butter recall.
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