User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Industrial Agriculture
Last updated: Apr 24 2015 02:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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New Studies Add to Growing Evidence That Notorious Pesticides Harm Bees 24.4.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Earth Day 2015: Regenerating the Soil and Reversing Global Warming 23.4.2015 Truthout.com
"The elimination of fossil fuels for all but the most limited and essential purposes is necessary but not sufficient to allow our descendants a fair chance for a healthy and prosperous future. Enhancing carbon biosequestration in terrestrial ecosystems is also essential."  - Wayne A. White, Biosequestration and Ecological Diversity p.118 (CRC Press 2013) The standard gloom and doom discourse surrounding global warming and climate change has infected the body politic with a severe case of depression and disempowerment. So starting April 22, embracing what the United Nations has designated as the "Year of the Soil," let's look at our planetary crisis from an entirely different, and more hopeful perspective. The good news is that the global grassroots, farmers and consumers united, can reverse our suicidal "business as usual" food, farming, energy, and land use practices. Harnessing the awesome power of Regenerative Organic Agriculture and reforestation, we can literally suck down enough excess (50-100 ppm ...
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Buzz over bee health: New pesticide studies rev up controversy 23.4.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Two new studies published in the journal Nature point to a connection between a class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids and a decline in bee health.
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Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy 23.4.2015 NPR Health Science
Two new studies published in the journal Nature point to a connection between a class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids and a decline in bee health. What's bad for bees is bad for crops, too.
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Popular pesticide hurts wild bees in major field study 22.4.2015 AP Top News
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A common type of pesticide is dramatically harming wild bees, according to a new in-the-field study that outside experts say may help shift the way the U.S. government looks at a controversial class of chemicals....
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Tainted love: Bees prefer food laced with harmful pesticides 22.4.2015 New Scientist: GM Organisms
Rather than avoid neonicotinoid pesticides, bees opt specifically for sugars that contain the chemicals – even though they might be detrimental to wild ...
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With EPA Lawsuit, Environmental Groups Step Up Fight Against 'Super-Toxic Chemical Cocktail' 21.4.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Palm Oil Plantations Are Blamed For Many Evils. But Change Is Coming 21.4.2015 NPR: Morning Edition
In Indonesia, efforts are underway to grow palms in a sustainable way. But that's putting a squeeze on small farmers.
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The Fight Widens: NRDC challenges the approval of the pesticide combination Enlist Duo in nine more states 21.4.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Sylvia Fallon, Senior Scientist, Washington, DC: Back in October, EPA approved a new pesticide, Enlist Duo, which combines glyphosate (commonly known as Roundup) with another powerful weed killer called 2,4 D in six states (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin). NRDC filed a...
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Coalition Challenges Expansion of Hazardous Herbicide Containing Agent Orange Ingredient 21.4.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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How to end the fertilizer guessing game 20.4.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Karen Chapman As spring planting season gets underway, many farmers are starting to wonder how much nitrogen they should apply to their crops this year to maximize yields. The traditional approach is to apply a bit of extra fertilizer as an insurance policy to protect yields in case some of it washes away. The problem is, this is costly – nitrogen fertilizer accounts for at least half of farmers’ input costs, even though on average, 50 percent of the nitrogen applied is lost – and harmful to air and water quality. What we need is to get to a sweet spot of fertilizer application – meaning the right amount that both protects natural resources and maximizes yields. I asked Thomas Morris, professor of soil fertility at the University of Connecticut, about ways that research, precision agriculture tools, and data analysis can help farmers determine the right amount of fertilizer to apply to their crops. Is the old adage about "a pound of nitrogen per bushel” accurate?  Many farmers who have been paying ...
The World Bank and the Battle for the Future of Farming 17.4.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Coastal razor clam digs continue this weekend 16.4.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Most areas have seen limits and more digs are scheduled this weekend at Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks and Copalis.
Genetic Engineering of Food Is Not the Answer 15.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In January 2001, I went to California's Monterey coast for the Asilomar ecological conference. About 300 people met in Watsonville to take a bus tour through farms in the prosperous Pajaro Valley near Watsonville. In the bus I met an organic farmer who made a modest living near Santa Cruz from growing tomatoes on two acres of land. He said he quit working for a global food company because he disagreed with its immoral behavior. "What you hear of Monsanto," he said, "is nor practiced by Monsanto alone. Agribusiness companies are not trying to feed the world. Their game is power, monopolies, and profits." Monsanto, of course, is the American giant multinational seed, pesticide, and drug company pushing the genetic engineering of food to its limits. Some of the seeds Monsanto is selling to farmers are designed to bring traditional farming to an end. The Monsanto farmers must buy their seeds from Monsanto every growing season. This is what the organic farmer had in mind with his warning about ...
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Has Glyphosate Met Its Waterloo? 11.4.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Lowe's To Stop Selling Neonicotinoid Pesticides That May Be Harmful To Bees 10.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Home improvement chain Lowe's Cos Inc will stop selling a type of pesticide suspected of causing a decline in honeybee populations needed to pollinate key American crops, following a few U.S. retailers who have taken similar steps last year. The class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, are sold by agrichemical companies to boost yields of staple crops but are also used widely on annual and perennial plants used in lawns and gardens. Scientists, consumer groups, beekeepers and others say bee deaths are linked to the neonic pesticides. The bee die-off is worrisome for agriculture because honeybees pollinate plants that produce about a fourth of the food consumed by Americans. Lowe's said it will phase out neonics in shelf products and plants by the spring of 2019, as suitable alternatives become available. A study released by environment group Friends of the Earth and Pesticide Research Institute in 2014 showed that 51 percent of garden plants purchased at Lowe's, Home ...
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Lowe's Commits to Decisive Action to Protect Bees and Other Pollinators 9.4.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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With no energy trading misstep, Cargill profit jumps 33 percent 9.4.2015 Star Tribune: Business
Results were led by its animal nutrition and protein businesses, and helped by a comparison to weakness a year ago.
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Cargill Revenue Falls on Slowing Growth 9.4.2015 Wall St. Journal: US Business
Cargill said that revenue fell 11% in the February quarter because of slowing growth in the food market and the impact of the stronger dollar.
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CHS Inc. 2Q earnings decline because of oil slump 9.4.2015 Star Tribune: Business
Energy business income declined, but local retail operations and wholesale fertilizer sales improved
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