User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Industrial Agriculture
Last updated: Sep 05 2015 24:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How Much Bacteria Is in Your Burger? 4.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture Just in time to put a damper on your Labor Day barbecue, the latest edition of Consumer Reports Magazine hit newsstands yesterday with the cover story, " How Safe is Your Ground Beef? " Our two-word summary: Not very. In fact, the recent Consumer Reports study profiled in the article revealed that every sample of ground beef collected by researchers from supermarkets around the country contained enterococcus and/or nontoxin-producing E. coli, which indicate fecal contamination. In other words, all the beef had poop on it. Pretty gross. And pretty dangerous - since feces can contain a host of harmful bacteria that can sicken (or kill) humans, this degree of contamination presents a serious food safety risk. In fact, according to a report by the FDA and CDC, 46 percent of E. coli O157 illnesses and nine percent of foodborne Salmonella illnesses could be attributed to beef. Between 2003 and 2012, outbreaks of E. coli O157 related to beef (mostly ground beef) ...
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Why Consumers Matter in Realizing Workers' Rights 4.9.2015 Yahoo: Business
Protest-Woodward. Farmworkers and consumers unite thousands strong in marches, fasts and protests to demand food retailers join the Fair Food Program. Ahold USA, which owns supermarket brands Stop & Shop, Giant, Martin's and Peapod, just joined the Program in July 2015. Credit: Forest WoodwardIn March of 2002, Irvine California saw its...
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How Much Bacteria Is in Your Burger? 4.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture Just in time to put a damper on your Labor Day barbecue, the latest edition of Consumer Reports Magazine hit newsstands yesterday with the cover story, " How Safe is Your Ground Beef? " Our two-word summary: Not very. In fact, the recent Consumer Reports study profiled in the article revealed that every sample of ground beef collected by researchers from supermarkets around the country contained enterococcus and/or nontoxin-producing E. coli, which indicate fecal contamination. In other words, all the beef had poop on it. Pretty gross. And pretty dangerous - since feces can contain a host of harmful bacteria that can sicken (or kill) humans, this degree of contamination presents a serious food safety risk. In fact, according to a report by the FDA and CDC, 46 percent of E. coli O157 illnesses and nine percent of foodborne Salmonella illnesses could be attributed to beef. Between 2003 and 2012, outbreaks of E. coli O157 related to beef (mostly ground beef) ...
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Beware! Monsanto Turns Its Attention to the Produce Aisle 4.9.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Genna Reed

Taxpayer-funded research should benefit the public, right? Sadly, that often isn’t the case when it comes to seeds. With a majority of the world’s seeds now owned by very few companies, it’s even more disturbing that publicly funded research on non-genetically engineered hybrids is resulting not in new varieties that are available to everyone, but in patented seeds controlled by big seed companies.

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The Latest: Police to examine video in cop shooting probe 4.9.2015 Yahoo: US National
FOX LAKE, Ill. (AP) — The latest on the fatal shooting of a police officer in northern Illinois (all times ...
Both wild and hatchery coho become fair game off the coast starting Friday 3.9.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Coastal salmon anglers will be able to keep both wild and hatchery coho salmon, beginning Friday, Sept. 4. “With so much of the coho catch quota remaining this late in the season, we can allow anglers to keep both hatchery and wild coho without exceeding our conservation objectives for wild salmon,” said Doug Milward, the […]
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Addiction Science Can Help Us Understand the Bee Crisis 2.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The collapse of bee colonies around the world has received much publicity lately. It is a trend with alarming implications given bees' crucial role in pollinating many agricultural crops, and some researchers have attributed it, at least in part, to widespread use of a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids. These are chemically related to nicotine, and they are thought to challenge the health of bee colonies by impairing bees' ability to learn and navigate as well as impairing their motor functioning. Recent research now suggests that bees may be preferentially drawn to foods laced with these pesticides as a result of reward mechanisms. It is a fascinating lesson in how knowledge gleaned from one area of science -- in this case addiction science -- can inform our understanding of a global ecological crisis. Image Courtsey of CC0 Public Domain In a letter published in Nature in May , a team of British researchers reported that honeybees and bumblebees actually preferred sucrose solutions that ...
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How Ecological Intensification Can Feed the World 2.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
To feed a global population of 9.1 billion people, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization predicts that food production will need to increase 70 percent by 2050. Moreover, 90 percent of this increase will have to come from intensification of agriculture -- getting more crops out of the same amount of farmland -- rather than expansion of cropland. This is a huge challenge, because conventional intensification has relied on monoculture and its associated inputs -- pesticides, artificial fertilizers, and fossil fuels -- to achieve a decline in global hunger. As increases in crop yields level off, nearly 1 billion people continue to suffer from hunger around the world. Furthermore, vitamin and mineral deficiencies and obesity add to the triple burden of malnutrition faced by low-income nations. Yield gains provided uneven benefits across the globe, exacerbating food insecurity in regions where diets became less diverse and farmers lost their land to industrial agriculture. These pressing challenges are ...
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Can This Genius Strategy Stop Big Ag from Dumping Fertilizer Into Drinking Water? 2.9.2015 Mother Jones
Gary Taxali Corn is to Iowa what oil is to Texas—so it's not every day that an Iowa official takes on the state's biggest industry. But Bill Stowe, CEO and general manager of Des Moines Water Works , has had it with Big Ag. It "rules the roost in this world," he says. "It's a nasty business." Stowe isn't just talking smack: Last March, in an unprecedented move, Des Moines Water Works filed a lawsuit in federal court against three upstream counties, charging that they violate the federal Clean Water Act by allowing fertilizer to flow into one of the rivers from which the city gets its drinking water. The suit will likely drag out for years, says Neil Hamilton, director of Drake University's Agricultural Law Center . But if it succeeds, it will not only force farmers upstream from Des Moines to limit their fertilizer runoff; it could also herald a new era for the Clean Water Act , the '70s-era legislation that severely limited pollution from heavy industry but left farms essentially unregulated. Not ...
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Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance 2.9.2015 NPR Health Science
The aquaculture project would be the same size as New York's Central Park and produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year. But some people see it as an aquatic "factory farm."
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Powerful Business: The Lever for Change Across the Supply Chain 1.9.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world. -Archimedes Sometimes when a problem seems too big, too ugly and too complex to handle, you need a lever to help move things along.  All of the big environmental problems we currently face fall into this category. When it comes to tackling our planet’s biggest problems, there is a full spectrum of approaches and many different leverage points. For me, the most important lever is business. A thriving planet and a thriving economy don’t have to be at odds. EDF is focusing on helping businesses make their supply chains cleaner, more efficient and more profitable. Working with powerful business has been a cornerstone of EDF’s approach ever since we launched our 1st partnership with McDonald’s 25 years ago. Since then, we have kick-started market transformations in fast food with McDonalds and Starbucks, shipping with FedEx, retail with Walmart, and private equity with KKR. With each partnership, we’ve worked to create ...
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Managing rivers for wild and hatchery raised steelhead 29.8.2015 Seattle Times: Opinion
We should ensure that we can recover wild steelhead while still providing a fishing opportunity.
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Bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides even worse than previously thought 27.8.2015 TreeHugger
More than ever, it looks like a broad ban on these chemicals is required to give bees a chance.
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New Study Reveals Yet More Risks to Bees from Controversial Pesticides 27.8.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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How Safe Is Your Ground Beef? 27.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Beekeepers, Environmentalists Question EPA's Commitment to Saving Bees 27.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Monsanto, rivals eye next step after Syngenta deal collapse 27.8.2015 Yahoo: Business
By P.J. Huffstutter CHICAGO (Reuters) - Monsanto Co , having ditched an audacious $46 billion offer for Syngenta AG , may downshift to a humbler strategy of beefing up its crop protection portfolio through other acquisitions, partnerships and licensing agreements. On Wednesday, Monsanto said it was focused on its core businesses and plans to resume its two year, $10 billion share repurchase program, which was put on hold while it was bidding for Syngenta. Monsanto declined to say anything more about its next move, including which companies might be the St. Louis-based firm's next target or how much it would be willing to ...
DPR, Protect Kids THIS School Year 26.8.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Andrea Spacht, Program Assistant, Health and Environment Program, San Francisco: This last week in August has always been my favorite time of year: the seasons are just starting to change but the weather is still warm and pleasant, gardens are flourishing, and as a child back to school meant back...
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The drought's hidden victim: California's native fish 24.8.2015 LA Times: Top News
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Truth In Labeling—It's Our Right to Know What's in Our Food 21.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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