User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Industrial Agriculture
Last updated: Nov 28 2014 23:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Organic Food Activists Take Thanksgiving Fight to Monsanto's Front Lawn 27.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Experts Urge Federal Task Force: Listen to Science. Ditch Neonics 26.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Agricultural and Food Controversies 25.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Most of us have heard that eating beef is one of the worse things we can do for the planet. Yet as we ponder the choice of arugula over Romaine hearts, we may also hear that these vegetables are sprayed with more pesticides than grain crops. So perhaps we move on to organic until we learn that organics too use pesticides, and that the production method may not make the most efficient use of our scarce resources . And so it goes, comparing the carbon footprint of local to free range, asking waiters whether there's a GMO in our soup, all while speculating whether the Farm Bill is the cause of obesity. Where is one to turn to adjudicate the conflicting messages we hear about food and agriculture? Large agribusinesses have a lot to say on these issues, but their predictable messages about feeding the world easy to dismiss. Journalists and non-profits with earnest, academic sounding names might appear a bit more credible, but their constant drum roll of fear and paranoia, undoubtedly appealing to a certain ...
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Holiday cheer shouldn't include toxic pesticides 25.11.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: I remember the ritual in our house every November — setting up the nice dining table for the grown-ups, and dusting off the rickety folding table where us kids would crowd in to share our holiday meal (though the sharing...
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In wake of China rejections, GMO seed makers limit U.S. launches 25.11.2014 Yahoo: Business
By Tom Polansek (Reuters) - China’s barriers to imports of some U.S. genetically modified crops are disrupting seed companies' plans for new product launches and keeping at least one variety out of the U.S. market altogether. Two of the world's biggest seed makers, Syngenta AG and Dow AgroSciences, are responding with tightly controlled U.S. launches of new GMO seeds, telling farmers where they can plant new corn and soybean varieties and how can the use them. Bayer CropScience told Reuters it has decided to keep a new soybean variety on hold until it receives Chinese import approval. ...
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Moms, Farmers Head to Court to Keep Maui from Becoming 'Poisoned Paradise' 25.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Coalition Steps in to Defend Maui Residents from Pesticides and GE Contamination 25.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Efforts to Curb Destructive Palm Oil Plantations Brings Together Strange Bedfellows 23.11.2014 Truthout.com
Will corporations and activists join forces to end deforestation in Indonesia? September brought good news for the world’s forests with the unveiling of the New York Declaration on Forests at the UN Climate Summit. The Declaration, which pledges to end global deforestation by 2030, was signed by 130 governments, including the US, Germany, Indonesia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Perhaps most significantly, it was also backed by commitments from 40 major food corporations to eliminate palm oil grown on deforested land from their supply chains. That’s a big deal, given that palm oil has been the single largest driver of tropical deforestation in recent years. When the medical establishment deemed trans-fats heart-unhealthy in the mid-1990s, demand for the supposedly more benign palm oil soared, increasing nearly six-fold since the year 2000. Palm oil is now used in nearly half of all foods on supermarket shelves, added to everything from breakfast cereals to margarine to potato chips. It is ...
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Is the Grass-Fed Really Greener? Beef Production in the Americas 23.11.2014 Truthout.com
In the Americas, three nations prevail as leading consumers and producers of beef: the United States, Brazil, and Argentina. From burgers to filet mignon, beef is often considered a staple food, even a delicacy. Its consumption is deeply ingrained in some cultures, but only a few understand the impact of industrial demand of cattle products. Most people are not aware that beef production is directly responsible for producing vast levels of greenhouse gases and expanding deforestation, especially in the Amazon forest region. In fact, in the past 25 years forests with an area the size of India have been cleared in Central and South America.[ 1 ] Although demand for beef has stagnated in the U.S. and certain Latin American countries, worldwide consumption continues to expand, and producers in the Western hemisphere are eager to supply. In fact, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) predicts that beef production and consumption will double by 2050, a situation that can ultimately be costly to the ...
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A Poetic Exploration Of The Hunting Tradition In America's North 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photographer Clare Benson comes from a long line of hunters. Growing up in northern Michigan, she remembers her father, now 82 years old, winning archery championships and reminiscing about his time as a hunting guide in the Alaskan wilderness. For her, the tradition of hunting -- and the rugged northern landscape that serves as its backdrop -- represents themes of memory and mortality, ones she's managed to weave in and out of her work for some time. Her series "The Shepard's Daughter" addresses her connection to hunting most directly. The images show Benson, her sister and her father trekking through snow-covered scenes, respectfully carrying the spoils of hunting trips past. She pointedly juxtaposes portraits of her family members lounging in contemplation with photographs of the animals they hunt, skin, cook and eat. Set in a vast world unfamiliar to most urban dwellers, Benson paints a picture of a hunting tradition we don't often encounter. The Shepherd's Daughter, 2012 The project, she explained ...
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This Thanksgiving, Don't Be Bamboozled by Butterball's 'Humane' Turkeys 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Earlier this month, PETA filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission asking that it compel Butterball to stop misleading consumers about its procedures for raising and killing turkeys. Butterball participates in the American Humane Association's American Humane Certified (AHC) program and can slap "humane certified" labels on its products, even though its turkeys suffered immensely before arriving on supermarket shelves. AHC standards allow producers to crowd turkeys into dark sheds that reek of ammonia; amputate their toes and cut off their beaks, which causes acute and chronic pain; hang them upside down by their legs; and then electrocute them. In other words -- it's the same old same old. Although the meat industry would like us to believe that we can have our turkey breasts and bacon everything with a clear conscience, that's a bigger load of manure than even a factory farm generates. It's a gimmick. The only 100 percent "humane" meat is no meat at all. It may make people feel better ...
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These Happy Sanctuary Turkeys Might Change The Way You Feel About Thanksgiving 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
These turkeys are living it up this Thanksgiving, safe and happy on farm animal sanctuaries. Farm sanctuaries take in all kinds of farm animals, typically those rescued from factory farms or slaughterhouses, and let them live out their lives in greener pastures. They also devote a lot of time to advocating for farm animals, and many promote a vegan lifestyle. So what do these sanctuaries do to celebrate Thanksgiving? Well, it's still all about the turkey, only the turkeys are the guests of honor, not the entree. Turkeys typically get to chow down on squash, salad, cranberries and pie. After the turkeys enjoy their meal, the humans sit down to a Thanksgiving dinner free of meat, eggs and dairy. Lots of sanctuaries, like those run by the nonprofit Farm Sanctuary , also allow you to sponsor or "adopt" a turkey by donating in honor of Thanksgiving. Farm Sanctuary spokeswoman Meredith Turner told The Huffington Post that the rescued animals "serve as ambassadors for the billions of farm animals still ...
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Depending on marine location the winter hatchery chinook fishery is chugging along at a good clip 20.11.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
It was a very busy weekend for marine salmon anglers all across open areas of Puget Sound, and the catches should remain productive.
18 Stunning India-Based Instagram Feeds You Should Be Following 19.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A photo posted by Subhash Chandra (@subhash_chandra) on Sep 9, 2014 at 7:34pm PDT 5. Hashim Badani: A self-described "chronicler of the mundane," Badani tends to shoot in and around Mumbai. Every once in a while though, the Lonely Planet contributor happens on somewhere completely surreal (see below). A photo posted by hashimbadani (@hashimbadani) on Nov 11, 2014 at 12:15am PDT 6. Siddhartha Joshi: This wandering photographer is another strong portraitist, whose subjects range from kids at play to the army men patrolling India's northern borders. A photo posted by Sid (@siddharthajoshi) on Aug 8, 2014 at 5:56am PDT A photo posted by Sid (@siddharthajoshi) on Oct 10, 2014 at 8:22am PDT 7. @my_mumbai: This popular feed features work by anyone who tags their photos #my_mumbai. The resulting account is sweeping, well-curated, and -- for anyone drawn to the world's densest locales -- undoubtedly worth a follow. A photo posted by #MyMumbai (@my_mumbai) on Oct 10, 2014 at 2:59am PDT A photo posted by #MyMumbai ...
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Monsanto Is Using Big Data to Take Over the World 19.11.2014 Mother Jones
You probably know Monsanto as the world's leading producer of genetically engineered seeds—a global agribusiness giant whose critics accuse it of everything from boosting our reliance on pesticides to driving Indian farmers to suicide . But that's actually just the latest in a long series of evolving corporate identities. When the company was founded in 1901 by a St. Louis pharmacist, its initial product was artificial sweetener. Over the next few decades Monsanto expanded into industrial chemicals, releasing its first agricultural herbicide, 2,4-D, in 1945. In the '50s it produced laundry detergent, the infamous insecticide DDT, and chemical components for nuclear bombs. In the '60s it churned out Agent Orange for the Vietnam War. In the '70s it became one of the largest producers of LED lights. It was around this time that Robb Fraley, now Monsanto's chief technology officer, joined the company as a mid-level biotechnology scientist. Back then, he recalls, the company had its hand in oil wells, ...
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California Chinook salmon fall run slowed amid warm weather, drought 18.11.2014 Yahoo: US National
By Sharon Bernstein SACRAMENTO Calif. (Reuters) - The annual fall migration of Chinook salmon has been delayed by warmer water temperatures and slow-flowing streams in parts of California as the state's three-year drought drags on, hatchery officials said Monday. Cool November temperatures usually bring thousands of adult salmon from the Pacific Ocean into streams and rivers to spawn. ...
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Bid data companies agree: Farmers should own information 16.11.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Some of the biggest names in American agriculture, ranging from farmers' organizations to private companies like Monsanto and DuPont, have agreed on principles governing the use of data collected from farms.
Maui's GMO Ban Blocked By Federal Judge 15.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
HONOLULU (AP) — A federal judge says Maui County may not implement a new law banning the cultivation of genetically modified organisms until he can consider arguments in a lawsuit against the measure.

Judge Barry Kurren said Friday that both sides have agreed to delay the date the law goes into effect. Monsanto Co. and a unit of Dow Chemical Co. sued the county earlier this week to stop the law. Local businesses joined the lawsuit.

Maui voters passed a ballot initiative last week creating the law. The measure was to take effect after officials certified the election results. That was expected late this month.

Kenneth Robbins, an attorney for the plaintiffs, says Kurren is saying the plaintiffs have shown they could potentially suffer irreparable harm if the law goes into effect.
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Monsanto, Dow Chemical File Lawsuit to Destroy Maui County's GMO Ban 14.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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US/India WTO Agreement: How Corporate Greed Trumps Needs of World's Poor and Hungry 14.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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