User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Policy
Last updated: Nov 17 2017 24:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Food Industry Has the Trump Administration Right Where It Wants It 16.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. When Donald Trump was elected president, American consumer protection groups, food safety advocates and commentators were "on high alert." Two months prior, his campaign had posted -- and later deleted -- an online fact sheet that highlighted a number of "regulations to be eliminated" under his proposed economic plan. The document read in part: The FDA Food Police, which [sic] dictate how the federal government expects farmers to produce fruits and vegetables and even dictates the nutritional content of dog food. The rules govern the soil farmers use, farm and food production hygiene, food packaging, food temperatures and even what animals may roam which fields and when. It also greatly increased inspections of food 'facilities,' and levies new taxes to pay for this inspection overkill.  Now, with Trump's first year in office characterized by tumult and scandal (including the FBI's ongoing ...
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New Research Shows: Organic Farming Can Make an Important Contribution to World Nutrition 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A global conversion to organic farming can contribute to a profoundly sustainable food system, provided that it is combined with further measures, specifically with a one-third reduction of animal-based products in the human diet, less concentrated feed and less food waste. At the same time, this type of food system has extremely positive ecological effects, i.e. considerable reduction of fertilizers and pesticides, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions – and does not lead to increased land use, despite lower agricultural yields. These are the findings of a new study, which included the Vienna-based Department of Social Ecology among its contributors. Results have recently been published in “Nature Communications”.   
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Coming up: a pill with a digital sensor to track if you took your medicine 14.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

U.S. regulators have approved the first drug with a sensor that can track whether patients have taken their medicine.

The Abilify pill was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2002 to treat schizophrenia, and the sensor technology was approved for marketing in 2012. The FDA said...

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Street vendors could be banned near Hollywood Boulevard, Staples Center and other areas 9.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Near the bustling corner of Hollywood and Highland, Coty O’Donohue sells bottled water, sodas, cellphone accessories and other knickknacks to tourists strolling down the Walk of Fame.

“We’re out here trying to make an honest dollar,” said O’Donohue, a 22-year-old from Michigan trying to launch...

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Listeria found at LAX catering facility; multiple airlines still buying its food 2.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

American Airlines has suspended use of a caterer at Los Angeles International Airport after listeria was found in the caterer's facility, but Delta Air Lines continues to get meals from the kitchen.

A spokeswoman for Atlanta-based Delta said Thursday that the kitchen operated by Gate Gourmet complies...

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Little follow-up when FDA finds high levels of perchlorate in food 2.11.2017 Nanotechnology Notes
Tom Neltner, J.D., is Chemicals Policy Director and Maricel Maffini, Ph.D., Consultant For more than 40 years, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has conducted the Total Diet Study (TDS) to monitor levels of approximately 800 pesticides, metals, and other contaminants, as well as nutrients in food. The TDS’s purposes are to “track trends in the […]
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An Environmental and Public Health Disaster Awaits -- if USDA Gives Organic Label to Hydroponics 31.10.2017 Truthout.com
Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! Whether food production entails acres of mono-crops, livestock shuttled through assembly lines or orderly tracks of plastic pipelines in factory-scale hydroponics spaces, streamlined production techniques tempt food producers to improve on nature, without necessarily assessing the long-term health or environmental costs. Even an apparently benign innovation, like hydroponics, may convey unexpected downsides. Despite each new agricultural novelty, 17 years after the  US Department of Agriculture  established the Organic Standards, earth-based farming remains the oldest and most proven method for cultivating organic food. A coalition of farmers, sustainability advocates and foodies wants to keep it that way. "If we want to protect the integrity of the organic seal, we will have to fight for it," says Lisa Stokke, founder of  Next7 , which has launched a campaign to raise ...
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FDA moves to ax claim for heart benefits from soy foods 31.10.2017 AP Business
WASHINGTON (AP) -- U.S. regulators want to remove a health claim about the heart benefits of soy from cartons of soy milk, tofu and other foods, saying the latest scientific evidence no longer shows a clear connection....
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Four things you should know about food security in Africa 30.10.2017 Washington Post
Four things you should know about food security in Africa
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McDonald's will shift to more humane chicken slaughter policy 28.10.2017 LA Times: Commentary

McDonald’s took another step Friday toward softening its image with animal-conscious consumers, saying it will require suppliers to treat chickens better and slaughter them more humanely.

Birds sold to the chain by poultry giants such as Tysons Foods Inc. and Cargill no longer will be shocked,...

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Too fast for safety? Poultry industry wants to speed up the slaughter line 27.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The National Chicken Council says the move is needed to keep pace with international competitors. But worker and food-safety advocates say this could cause more stress and injuries.
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Too Fast For Safety? Poultry Industry Wants To Speed Up The Slaughter Line 27.10.2017 NPR News
The National Chicken Council says the move is needed to keep pace with international competitors. But worker and food-safety advocates say this could cause more stress and injuries.
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The FDA will decide if these 26 ingredients count as fiber 23.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Chicory root. Bamboo. Soy fiber: Manufacturers can use these to add fiber to foods. Critics say this makes snack foods seem healthy. FDA will decide if these can count as fiber on nutrition labels.
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The FDA Will Decide If These 26 Ingredients Count As Fiber 23.10.2017 NPR: Morning Edition
Chicory root. Bamboo. Soy fiber: Manufacturers can use these to add fiber to foods. Critics say this makes snack foods seem healthy. FDA will decide if these can count as fiber on nutrition labels.
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Americans' Appetite for Cheap Meat Linked to Widespread Drinking Water Contamination 20.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Agricultural pollution is contaminating drinking water supplies for millions of Americans with potentially dangerous chemicals, says a new report. Environmental groups blame the meat industry, which requires massive supplies of industrially grown corn and soy to raise cattle, and are putting pressure on large-scale meat producers to get their supply chains to clean up their acts. Scientists recently announced that the "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico, an area the size of New Jersey where oxygen levels are too low to sustain most forms of life, is larger than ever. For years, environmentalists have used annual surveys of the dead zone to bring attention to large amounts of agricultural pollution from the nation's breadbasket that flows down the Mississippi River and fuels oxygen-depleting algae blooms in the Gulf.    This year, the message is hitting much closer to home, especially for those living near farmlands. A new  report  from the Environmental Working Group shows that the agricultural pollution ...
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Cutting-edge immunotherapy treatment approved for another deadly cancer 19.10.2017 Washington Post
Cutting-edge immunotherapy treatment approved for another deadly cancer
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US agency withdraws rule aimed at protecting animal farmers 18.10.2017 AP Business
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) -- The Trump administration's decision to kill a rule designed to protect the rights of farmers who raise chickens, cows and hogs for the United States' largest meat processors has infuriated farmer advocates, including a Republican senator from Iowa who said he has "violent opposition" to the move....
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How a group of Florida tomato growers could help derail NAFTA 18.10.2017 Washington Post
How a group of Florida tomato growers could help derail NAFTA
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USDA Drops Tighter Rules on Meatpackers 17.10.2017 Wall St. Journal: US Business
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has dropped efforts to tighten regulations governing how meat companies’ deal with the farmers who raise the nation’s poultry and livestock.
FDA Panel Endorses Gene Therapy For A Form Of Childhood Blindness 13.10.2017 NPR Health Science
Food and Drug Administration advisers unanimously recommended that the agency approve the first gene therapy for an inherited disease — a rare defect that causes blindness in children.
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