User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Safety :: GMOs
Last updated: Dec 08 2016 03:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Victory! GE Mosquitoes Will Not Be Let Loose on Florida Community 8.12.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Food Safety The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it will not move forward with the controversial release of millions of genetically engineered (GE) mosquitoes in the community of Key Haven in Monroe County, Florida. The release of the GE mosquitoes would have been the first-ever in the United States, but FDA failed to conduct adequate testing for potential impacts to people, threatened and endangered species, and the ...
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We've Been Sold a Lie for Two Decades About Genetically Engineered Foods 5.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
It appears Europe has been right all along to renounce genetically engineered (GE) crops. An in-depth examination recently published by The New York Times found that GE crops have largely failed to achieve two of the technology's primary objectives: to increase crop yields and decrease pesticide use. (Photo: Unsplash ) Editor's note from AlterNet: The terms GE (genetic engineering) and GMO (genetically modified organism) are often used interchangeably, but their meanings are different. GMOs, which are produced when plant breeders select genetic traits that may also occur naturally, have been around for centuries. Common examples are seedless watermelons and modern broccoli. The subject of much recent debate are GE foods, which have only been around in recent decades and are produced by transferring genes between organisms. The resulting GE organisms -- either plant-, or in the case of GE salmon, animal-based -- would not otherwise occur in nature. This article is about GE foods. In 1994, a tomato known ...
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Americans Just As Polarized On Food As They Are On Politics 5.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As the dust settles from the tumultuous presidential election and Americans look toward the start of a new administration, it’s clear that politics aren’t the only thing dividing our nation. According to a report released Thursday by the Pew Research Center, Americans are dramatically split in their attitudes toward the food they buy, and many don’t necessarily trust scientists to tell them what’s healthy. Nowhere are these divides more apparent than in opinions about organic food and food containing genetically modified ingredients. But surprisingly, these divisions do not follow party lines. The new Pew survey, which polled a nationally representative sample of 1,480 U.S. adults this summer, says 39 percent of Americans believe genetically modified foods are less healthy than non-genetically modified foods, while 48 percent believe there is no difference.  When it comes to organics, 55 percent of Americans believe organic produce is healthier than produce that’s grown using conventional farming ...
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Americans Don't Trust Scientists' Take On Food Issues 3.12.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A new survey finds strong public support for organic food, and suspicion of GMOs -- regardless of whether people vote Republican or Democratic. Also, people don't trust scientists much at all.
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Here's something Americans disagree about that has nothing to do with partisan politics: food 3.12.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A new report paints a picture of two Americas divided over something that’s a critical part of their daily life — food.

On one side are those who care deeply about the food they eat and how it is produced. These Americans embrace organic foods, are suspicious of genetically modified crops and are...

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Americans Don't Trust Scientists' Take On Food Issues 3.12.2016 NPR News
A new survey finds strong public support for organic food, and suspicion of GMOs — regardless of whether people vote Republican or Democratic. Also, people don't trust scientists much at all.
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Six Reasons We’ll Need to Ramp Up the #ConsumerRevolution under Trumpism 1.12.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Katherine Paul

If ever conditions were ripe for revolution, that time is now—especially for anyone who cares about their health, and the health of planet earth. 

President-Elect Donald Trump’s short lists for his environment and agriculture cabinet appointments are dominated by entrenched D.C. insiders, career politicians and industry lobbyists. Not one of these proposed “leaders” supports policies that would lead to healthier food, a cleaner environment or a cooler planet.  

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Advocates Challenge FDA on First Ever GE Mosquito Release 23.11.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Today a coalition of public interest groups filed a formal pre-litigation notice with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that they intend to sue the agency for its approval to release millions of genetically engineered (GE) mosquitoes into the environment.

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Food for thought, in 5 tasty GreenBiz videos 22.11.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Whether it's rampant food waste or the carbon footprint of meat, there's plenty to chew on at the holiday table.
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GMO labeling supporters fined $320K over campaign disclosure 22.11.2016 AP Washington
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- An Iowa-based organization that supported a Washington state ballot measure to require labeling of genetically modified foods in 2013 has been fined nearly $320,000 over campaign finance violations....
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Gates-funded research could help combat hunger with dramatic increases in crop yields 18.11.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Using genetic engineering techniques to alter photosynthesis, they increased the productivity of a test plant — tobacco — by as much as 20 percent, they said Thursday in a study published by the journal Science.
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Trump Talk of Pompeo for Cabinet Could Spell Setback for Consumers 18.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
News that President-elect Donald Trump is considering U.S. Rep. Mike Pompeo for a cabinet slot illustrates just how dark the days ahead might be for America's burgeoning "food movement," which has been advocating for more transparency and fewer pesticides in food production. Pompeo, a Republican from the farm state of Kansas, was the designated hitter for Monsanto Co. and the other Big Ag chemical and seed players in 2014 when the industry rolled out a federal effort to block states from mandating the labeling of genetically modified foods. Pompeo introduced the "Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act" in April of that year with the intention of overriding bills in roughly two dozen states. In bringing the bill forward, Pompeo was acting on behalf the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), which represents the interests of the nation's largest food and beverage companies. The bill, which critics called the "Deny Americans the Right to Know" Act, or the "DARK Act," went through two years of controversy and ...
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Why Are Taxpayers Being Asked to Pay to Promote a Failed GMO Technology? 7.11.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Katherine Paul

Last weekend (Oct. 29), the New York Times ran a piece on how the biotech industry has failed to deliver on its promises for GMO crops. The article followed less than a month after the biotech industry asked congressional leaders for $3 million in taxpayer-provided funding to “educate” the public about biotechnology and agricultural production.

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GMO seeds are sustaining Colorado’s sugar beet farms, but new labels could damage already shrinking industry 6.11.2016 Denver Post: All Political News
The first "Roundup Ready" sugar beet was approved by the USDA in 1999, but no one grew any back then. A second variety was approved in 2005, and that one wasn't grown either, mainly because candy and other kinds of manufacturers weren't interested in buying sugar from genetically engineered beets. It was 2008 when farmers began planting rows of GMO sugar beets, but uncertainty for farmers remained: a 2009 judge's ruling halted any new planting of the beets but those who had already planted were allowed to keep planting them. An organic seed grower in Oregon, who specialized in organic chard and table beets, worried the new genetically engineered beets at a neighboring farm were cross-pollinating with his beets and chard as their seeds floating in the wind. If his seeds tested positive for GMO, his seed business would be destroyed, he argued. "We feel their decision is still wrong and they are still not taking the contamination issue seriously," Sugar beet seeds carried by wind can cross pollinate ...
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Ruling Against Pro-GMO Lobby Highlights Dark Money's "Egregious" Role in State Ballot Fights 3.11.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Amid an election season where corporations are once again spending "vast unholy sums to defeat popular initiatives," a major food industry group has been found guilty of intentionally violating campaign finance laws by shielding its donors during Washington state's contentious 2013 GMO labeling fight.

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Business Highlights 1.11.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

___ Do candy and soda makers belong at a dietitians’ conference? BOSTON (AP) — The blinking game show wheel spins past logos for Triscuits, Wheat Thins and Honey Maid before the needle settles at Fig Newtons. “Newtons are made with real fruit and whole grains. True or false?” a Nabisco representative asks onlookers, who are […]
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The New York Times Cuts Through the Hype on GMOs 31.10.2016 Mother Jones
Genetically modified seeds emerged in the mid-1990s and have since conquered million of acres of US farmland. Today, upwards of 80 percent of corn, soybean, and cotton acreage are planted with crops engineered to withstand herbicides and/or insects, as have large portions of our sugar beet and alfalfa crops. Beyond the massive marketing triumph and financial success of companies like Monsanto and Syngenta—which sell both the seeds and the related herbicides—what has the industry achieved in terms of public benefits? Have they helped farmers churn out more food per acre and reduce pesticides, as the industry has long claimed? Or, as some of their more extreme critics suggest, are they subtly poisoning the food supply? In Sunday's New York Times, investigative journalist Danny Hakim has an elegant, in-depth piece digging beneath considerable industry hype to examine that question. His conclusion: while "fears that they are unsafe to eat" are  largely unsubstantiated, "genetic modification in the United ...
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Doubts raised about promised bounty of genetically modified crops 30.10.2016 Seattle Times: Local

Higher yields with less pesticides was the sales pitch for genetically modified seeds. But that has not proved to be the outcome in the United States.
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The Long March Against Monsanto: A Letter from The Hague 21.10.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Ronnie Cummins

We are today in the midst of a battleground for two very different approaches to agriculture. One is the agro-ecological approach based on the use of open source traditional seeds based on biodiversity and living in harmony with nature. The other is the mechanistic world of an industrial system based on monocultures, one-way extraction and the use of pesticides, poisons and GMOs, where chemical cartels compete to take over our agriculture and food systems, destroying our ecosystems along the way.” - Brochure for The People’s Assembly, The Hague, Oct.

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China’s Genetically Modified Food Dreams Face Bitter Harvest 20.10.2016 NY Times: Business
A Chinese firm’s $43 billion effort to buy Syngenta could upend the industry, but it faces widespread fears at home over modified food.
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