User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Safety :: Chemicals
Last updated: May 17 2017 20:04 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,883    
EPA Violated the Law When It Approved 59 Bee-Killing Pesticides 17.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Environmental Protection Agency will have some work to do, now that a federal court has decided it didn't comply with the  Endangered Species Act . You see, the EPA approved the registrations for 59  pesticide products  without first consulting with the US Fish and Wildlife Service on whether those chemicals posed a risk to  endangered species . The  court held  that the EPA improperly approved  38 pesticides  containing Thiamethoxam, and  21 pesticides  containing Clothianidin. Oops. It's quite a big "oops," actually, because these pesticides are all  neonicotinoids . If that term sounds familiar, it's because that's the type of insecticide many scientists believe has been killing bees for the last decade. Neonicotinoids are thought to be responsible for the phenomenon called " colony collapse disorder ," in which entire bee colonies just disappear almost overnight. The worker bees leave their hives and their queen behind, but no one knows where they go. American beekeepers began reporting this ...
Also found in: [+]
The labels said ‘organic.’ But these massive imports of corn and soybeans weren’t. 13.5.2017 Washington Post
The labels said ‘organic.’ But these massive imports of corn and soybeans weren’t.
Also found in: [+]
Dow Chemical is pushing Trump administration to ignore studies of toxic pesticide 20.4.2017 LA Times: Business

Dow Chemical is pushing the Trump administration to scrap the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species.

Lawyers representing Dow — whose chief executive also heads a White House manufacturing...

Also found in: [+]
Pesticide maker tries to kill risk study 20.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Dow Chemical is pushing the Trump administration to scrap the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species.
Also found in: [+]
Marijuana meets Big Food: Why green weed isn't easy to grow 20.4.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Cannabis companies are hiring agriculture experts to grow newly-legal businesses, but pitfalls like organic labeling and big energy bills loom large.
Also found in: [+]
AP Exclusive: Pesticide maker tries to kill risk study 20.4.2017 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Dow Chemical is pushing the Trump administration to scrap the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species....
Also found in: [+]
AP Exclusive: Pesticide maker tries to kill risk study 20.4.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dow Chemical is pushing the Trump administration to scrap the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species. Lawyers representing Dow, whose CEO also heads a White House manufacturing working group, and two other makers of organophosphates […]
Also found in: [+]
Trump Has Okayed a Pesticide That Terrifies These Families 19.4.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. A white cloud of pesticides had drifted into Fidelia Morales's back yard, coating her children's swing set. The 40-year-old mother of five gestured toward the citrus groves that surround her house in California's Central Valley as she recounted when an air blast sprayer sent chemicals floating onto her property last year – landing on her family's red and blue jungle gym. "We know this is dangerous for the kids, but what are we supposed to do?" she said on a recent afternoon, speaking in Spanish through a translator. Morales said she fears that these kinds of drifts, as well as long-term exposure to a variety of chemicals in the air, have hurt her children, ages 9 to 20, who have struggled to focus in school and have suffered from bronchitis, asthma and other chronic illnesses. Under Barack Obama, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an agricultural ban on chlorpyrifos, ...
Also found in: [+]
McDonald's, fast-food chains find antibiotic-free beef, pork hard to deliver 18.4.2017 Chicago Tribune: Business
Consumers are demanding more antibiotic-free meat. At McDonald's, so is a group of nuns. The world's largest burger chain and its fast-food brethren have made commitments to remove antibiotics from chicken, but plans to curb the use of antibiotics in beef and pork have been far less common. ...
Also found in: [+]
6 Ways Trump's Administration Could Literally Make America More Toxic 17.4.2017 Mother Jones
In late March, chlorpyrifos, a pesticide commonly used to ward off insects on fruit and vegetable crops, was nearing the end of a decade-long review process. There's strong evidence suggesting that the insecticide inhibits kids' brain development, and at least 80,000 scientists, environmentalists, and members of the public had signed a petition urging the Environmental Protection Agency to ban the stuff outright. But in the final stages of review, EPA director Scott Pruitt greenlighted the chemical instead , arguing there was insufficient evidence to ban it. Now farmers can continue to apply it to crops like corn, strawberries, almonds, and tomatoes. This year, more controversial pesticides are due for agency review, a process that weighs the latest scientific findings with public comment to determine whether the substance can continue to be used—though the White House has the final say. These reviews often lag for many years. And Trump's EPA, with its anti-regulatory bent and a new administrator plucked ...
Also found in: [+]
Pruitt's Rejection of Chlorpyrifos Ban Seems Based on "Alternative Facts" 9.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
EPA chief Scott Pruitt fails to explain what data prompted his decision to allow continued use of toxic pesticides. (Photo: Pixabay ) The US Environmental Protection Agency under President Trump may have stepped into the brave new world of alternative facts. Last November, after several years of study, the EPA had  announced  that the insecticide chlorpyrifos poses an unacceptable risk to humans, especially children, when its residue is found in fruits, vegetables, and drinking water. The finding cited a 2014  Columbia University study  and other research showing that young people have suffered diminished cognitive abilities and reduced IQ after chronic exposures. This led the EPA to recommend a ban on all agricultural uses of chlorpyrifos -- by far the most heavily used insecticide in the US with  4 to 8 million pounds applied annually . On a pounds per acre basis, the  heaviest applications of chlorpyrifos  in the US have been on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, where several large agribusiness have been ...
Also found in: [+]
Diet diary: As western diets take hold, there are growing gallstone cases 8.4.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
Also found in: [+]
Environmental Groups Take Trump EPA To Court To Force Ban Of Brain-Draining Pesticide 7.4.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Three environmental organizations have asked a federal appeals court to force the Environmental Protection Agency to ban a widely used pesticide  linked to brain damage  in children. A motion  filed Wednesday by Earthjustice  on behalf of two other organizations challenges EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s decision last week to reject the scientific findings of his own agency and allow chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate insecticide used on fruits, vegetables and nuts, to remain on the market for agricultural use. The groups asked the court to require EPA to ban the pesticide within 30 days. Patti Goldman, an Earthjustice attorney, told The Huffington Post that the Trump administration is failing to protect the public from a chemical its own scientists found to be dangerous. “If the head of the EPA isn’t respecting, following the law or the science, that will be of great concern across the board,” Goldman said.  Earthjustice is representing the Natural Resources Defense Council  and the ...
Also found in: [+]
Moms Exposed To Monsanto Weed Killer Means Bad Outcomes For Babies 5.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Concerns about the world’s most widely used herbicide are taking a new twist as researchers unveil data that indicates pervasive use of Monsanto Co.’s weed killer could be linked to pregnancy problems. Researchers looking at exposure to the herbicide known as glyphosate , the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup-branded herbicides, said they tested and tracked 69 expectant mothers and found that the presence of glyphosate levels in their bodily fluids correlated with unfavorable birth outcomes. The research is still in preliminary stages and the sample size is small, but t he team is scheduled to present their findings on Thursday at a conference put on by the Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN) in Washington, D.C. “This is a huge issue,” said Paul Winchester, medical director of the neonatal intensive care unit at the Franciscan St. Francis Health system and professor of clinical pediatrics at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, Indiana. He said this is the first U.S. study to ...
Also found in: [+]
Glyphosate: Health Concerns About the Most Widely Used Pesticide 5.4.2017 Truthout.com
Glyphosate is a synthetic herbicide patented in 1974 by the Monsanto Company, and now manufactured and sold by many companies in hundreds of products around the world. Glyphosate is best known as the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup branded herbicides. Here are some key facts about glyphosate: Most Widely Used Pesticide  According to a February 2016 study in  Environmental Sciences Europe , glyphosate is the  most widely used pesticide . "In the US, no pesticide has come remotely close to such intensive and widespread use," according to the study. Findings include: Americans have applied 1.8 million tons of glyphosate since its introduction in 1974. Worldwide 9.4 million tons of the chemical has been sprayed on fields -- enough to spray nearly half a pound of Roundup on every cultivated acre of land in the world. Globally, glyphosate use has risen almost 15-fold since so-called "Roundup Ready," genetically engineered glyphosate-tolerant crops were introduced in 1996. Cancer Concerns  In 2015, the ...
Also found in: [+]
Is adrenal fatigue real? Forget the label and treat the stress. 5.4.2017 Washington Post
Is adrenal fatigue real? Forget the label and treat the stress.
Also found in: [+]
EPA Chief's Refusal To Ban Brain-Damaging Pesticide Shows Profit Trumps Public Safety 31.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Defying the recommendation of his own agency’s scientists,  Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt  has refused to ban a widely used pesticide that’s been  linked to learning disabilities in children. Pruitt’s order , signed late Wednesday , allows  chlorpyrifos , an organophosphate insecticide that’s been used on crops from broccoli to cranberries since the 1960s, to remain on the market for agricultural use. The EPA proposed in November 2015 under the Obama administration to permanently ban the chemical on food crops, citing potential risks to human health. The move stemmed from a 2007 petition filed by the Natural Resources Defense Council  and the Pesticide Action Network North America .   Critics on Thursday condemned Pruitt and President Donald Trump  for showing they value corporate profits over public health. The move, less than two months after Pruitt was confirmed as the nation’s top environmental officer, signals far looser regulation of harmful substances ...
Also found in: [+]
Trump's EPA undoes effort to ban pesticide linked to nervous system damage in kids 31.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday reversed an Obama administration recommendation to ban a pesticide linked to nervous system damage in children.

Newly installed EPA administrator Scott Pruitt signed an order that would allow farmers to continue using chlorpyrifos, which is...

Also found in: [+]
EPA Rejects Own Science to Greenlight Brain-Damaging Pesticide 30.3.2017 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nika Knight, staff writer

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head Scott Pruitt denied a 10-year-old petition late Wednesday to ban the use of chlorpyrifos, a widely-used pesticide that harms children's brains, in a decision that outraged public health advocates and environmentalists.

Also found in: [+]
EPA decides not to ban a pesticide, despite its own evidence of risk 30.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
New EPA administrator Scott Pruitt has decided not to ban chlorpyrifos, a pesticide widely used on produce. That's despite evidence previously compiled by EPA showing it could pose risks to consumers.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,883