User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Sustainable Agriculture
Last updated: Jun 20 2017 19:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 6,176    
At 87, eco-legend Ken Sleight of Ed Abbey fame is still fighting Lake Powell — but knows it’s a losing battle 20.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Moab • Ensconced at the base of the La Sal Mountains, 15 miles south of Utah’s redrock capital, storied environmentalist Ken Sleight looks out over the landscape of a rich life. Immortalized as Seldom Seen Smith by Edward Abbey in his 1975 anarchist primer “The Monkey Wrench Gang,” Sleight, now 87, ponders the past and future of his beloved Colorado Plateau. He moves a little slower these days and has just undergone surgery to remove cancerous skin cells from his nose. But Sleight’s insights are... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
New Utah facility will be able to power a Bountiful-size city by digesting food waste, turning it into natural gas 16.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
North Salt Lake • State and local officials broke ground for Utah’s first food digester Thursday morning in a project aimed at reducing landfill waste and harnessing unused renewable energy. The North Salt Lake facility, to be opened in late 2018, will deploy anaerobic digesters to grind and liquify food waste, then use water, heat and bacteria to convert it into methane gas to be used as natural gas and bio-solids to be converted into fertilizer. The project, called Wasatch Resource Recovery, ...
Also found in: [+]
Want to Get "Back to the Land"? You're Not Alone 14.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Over the past century, generations of young people have turned their backs on city life to embrace small-scale farming and back-to-the-land ideals. The exact circumstances for each generation's return have varied: the Great Depression in the 1930s, the Vietnam War in the '60s and '70s, and, more recently, the loss of ecosystems and biodiversity to industrial agriculture and climate change. Each generation has had one common desire: to live a more honest, ethical life of self-sufficiency and oneness with nature. Young farmers today face serious structural obstacles: access to affordable land, a steep (and often self-financed) learning curve, debilitating student loans, and lack of access to health care. But three back-to-the-land farmers managed to succeed in a fickle vocation that seems to demand equal parts skill, determination, and luck. What choices did they make, and are their experiences instructive for struggling young farmers today? Jean-Martin Fortier: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants In the ...
Also found in: [+]
Women Small-Holder Farmers, Key Drivers for Sustainable Production 12.6.2017 Truthout.com
Through the Productive Assets Creation Programme, WFP in Zimbabwe supported 95,000 people in 2016 through the rehabilitation or creation of community assets, such as water harvesting systems. (Photo: courtesy of WFP) Harare, Zimbabwe—The shouts can be heard from a distance as one approaches Domboshawa, 30 kilometres northeast of the Zimbabwean capital, Harare. Tokupai madomasi! Tokupai mbambaira! Do you want tomatoes or sweet potatoes? Mune marii? How much do you have? Scores of women and children carrying bundles of vegetables, sacks of sweet potatoes and containers full of farming produce shout above the din of moving vehicles, trying to sell their produce for a meagre profit. Tsitsi Machingauta, 32, has a two-hectare farm in the area. She decries the numerous problems faced by smallholder farmers, which range from produce rotting in the fields due to the heavy downpours the country experienced this year, to a poor road network that restricts their access to markets. "Even when supermarket chains come ...
Also found in: [+]
How millions of cartons of 'organic' milk contain an oil brewed in industrial vats of algae 5.6.2017 Washington Post
Marketed as a nutritional enhancement, the oil is added to millions of cartons of organic milk from Horizon, one of the nation’s largest organic brands. But is milk supplemented with an oil brewed in a factory really “organic”?
Also found in: [+]
How this ninth-generation Californian got his start in organic farming 2.6.2017 L.A. Times - Food & Dining

Amigo Bob Cantisano has farmed in California since the mid-1970s — an array that includes tree fruits and nuts, berries, vegetables and olives, plus flowers and nursery stock. The 65-year-old farmer is on hiatus from working the land as he fights cancer, but he’s still tending his most important...

Also found in: [+]
Seeds of change: Mini gardens help drive the growth of food at home 31.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Container kits, designed for urban living and planted with recipes already in mind, are appealing to people who are interested in home cooking, food-sourcing and the environment.
Also found in: [+]
Seeds Of Change: Mini Gardens Help Drive The Growth Of Food At Home 31.5.2017 NPR News
Container kits, designed for urban living and planted with recipes already in mind, are appealing to people who are interested in home cooking, food-sourcing and the environment.
Also found in: [+]
How to eat fish with a clear conscience: What to buy and what to avoid 27.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Some seafood is sustainable - but a lot isn't. These basic tips from chef Michael Cimarusti will help you make educated decisions when it comes to seafood.
Also found in: [+]
Jayson Werth gave a great speech about organic farming (and coyote pelts) 25.5.2017 Washington Post
Jayson Werth gave a great speech about organic farming (and coyote pelts)
Also found in: [+]
Which fabrics are most sustainable? 24.5.2017 TreeHugger
Learn about a fabric's production and disposal in order to make an informed choice while shopping.
Also found in: [+]
VCs hunt for food delivery business that’s sustainable 21.5.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
Sprig, also in San Francisco, which is backed by Accel and other venture capitalists, is burning through $850,000 a month and is reportedly seeking a buyer. Eat Club offers similar options to Munchery or Sprig, with about 20 entrees per day, but delivers only to offices with 20 or more employees. By delivering an office’s meals together, the company estimates it costs 90 percent less per dish compared with on-demand startups. Eat Club said that its couriers drop off 20,000 meals a day, mainly to midsize technology companies such as Flipboard. Global investors had high hopes for on-demand meal delivery, doling out $4.1 billion in 2015, according to research firm CB Insights. Startups competed by offering elaborate marketing campaigns and steep discounts to customers. While it looks for a buyer, Sprig has started selling its food through competing apps, such as Caviar, to keep its kitchens busy. Brian Frank, who invests in young food companies through his FTW Ventures fund, said working with offices ...
Also found in: [+]
The USDA’s Senseless Obstacles To A More Humane 'Organic' 18.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Every day, millions of Americans visit their grocery stores, relying on a range of food labels – some more meaningful than others – to help them make healthy, humane, and cost-efficient purchases. One of these labels is “USDA Organic,” a certification that presumably represents humane farm animal welfare standards. But sadly, that assumption is untrue, and has been for years. What’s even more reprehensible is that the federal agency directly responsible for ensuring that farmed food products are truthfully labeled – the USDA – is now acting in direct opposition to that mission. Origins of the USDA “Organic” Label The USDA began regulating organic agriculture in 2000 with the creation of the National Organic Program. For years, the ASPCA and other animal welfare organizations have pushed to include meaningful animal welfare standards in the definition of organic – including minimum indoor and outdoor space requirements for chickens, required enrichment for certain species, and a prohibition on certain ...
Also found in: [+]
Religious beliefs involved in Oregon pesticide dispute 17.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

MORO, Ore. (AP) — Religious beliefs involving the use of pesticides are part of a dispute over noxious weeds on a 2,000-acre organic farm in Oregon that has attracted the attention of organic food supporters. Sherman County may order the owners of Azure Farms, near Moro, to spray to control the weeds if the farm […]
Also found in: [+]
The labels said ‘organic.’ But these massive imports of corn and soybeans weren’t. 13.5.2017 Washington Post
The labels said ‘organic.’ But these massive imports of corn and soybeans weren’t.
Also found in: [+]
Ag Dep’t delays animal welfare standards for organic meats 10.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is delaying for six months a rule that would require organic meat and egg producers to abide by stricter animal welfare standards. Former President Barack Obama’s Agriculture Department announced the rule two days before he left office in January. The regulations are designed to ensure that organically grown livestock […]
Also found in: [+]
Just How Organic Is Your Milk? Well, It Depends On The Dairy It Came From 6.5.2017 NPR: Saturday
Is there a difference between organic milk bought in a grocery store and milk bought straight from farmers? Washington Post reporter Peter Whoriskey talks with NPR's Scott Simon about his findings.
Also found in: [+]
It's time to make soil great again 6.5.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Restoring soil fertility is one of humanity’s best options for making progress on three daunting challenges: Feeding everyone, weathering climate change and conserving biodiversity.
Also found in: [+]
The tide is changing for offshore aquaculture 4.5.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
There are currently no commercial finfish operations in U.S. federal waters, but some are convinced proposed new farms in places like the Gulf of Mexico could become the future of sustainable seafood.
Also found in: [+]
Milk from large dairies, including Colorado’s Aurora Organic Dairy, may not be as organic as you think 3.5.2017 Denver Post: Business
Grazing practices at larger "organic" dairies produce milk that is almost identical to conventional milk in tests of fat types.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 6,176