User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Sustainable Agriculture
Last updated: Apr 27 2017 05:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Even the organic milk craze isn’t enough to end glut 27.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Organic milk production has surged so fast in the past two years that some of the surplus is being sold at a lower price without an organic label. A few dairies are just dumping what they can’t sell.
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Organic growers are split over industry-funded ad and promotion proposal 21.4.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

Producers of organic farm goods disagree over a plan to collect fees and tout products in much the same way that other programs promote cotton, beef or eggs.
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Mark Musick transformed the way Seattle thinks of local, seasonal food 20.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Local, seasonal, organic? Seattle food pioneer Mark Musick has been preaching it all for four decades.
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Marijuana meets Big Food: Why green weed isn't easy to grow 20.4.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Cannabis companies are hiring agriculture experts to grow newly-legal businesses, but pitfalls like organic labeling and big energy bills loom large.
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86 percent of shoppers care about animal welfare in organic meats and poultry, Consumer Reports says 20.4.2017 Denver Post: Local
The National Organics Standards Board on Wednesday opened public hearings in Denver to to gauge whether producers of organic meat and poultry should be held to higher animal welfare standards. A new Consumer Reports survey strongly suggests that the issue is important to consumers.
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Sustainable meat — made in a box? 19.4.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Can new modular, USDA-compliant meat processing units tucked into shipping containers help make small- to mid-scale farms more successful and sustainable?
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Why Small-Scale Farming Is Our Best Hope For Restoring Rural America (And Combatting Climate Change) 18.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Boarded-up business districts. Abandoned warehouses. Barns and homes covered by tarps slowly collapsing into the earth. It was startling how often this scene repeated as I drove through the rural areas of the Midwest, South, and West on the road trip that resulted in the book  The Revolution Where You Live . Many of these are the same areas that famously voted for a loudmouth New Yorker. For some, he better represented conservative, rural values than Hillary Clinton did. These devastated regions, where opioid addiction is at epidemic levels, are places that ran out of hope. The cynical and bankrupt answers offered up by the 45th president will not bring prosperity to these regions. But neither would the corporate-friendly policies of a President Hillary Clinton and others in her wing of the Democratic Party. So what actually would bring about rural prosperity? I found some hints on my long road trip. The relatively prosperous small towns I stumbled on often turned out to include large Amish or Mennonite ...
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Iowa City's Sustainability Showcase: Gaia's Peace Garden Blooms As Model Urban Oasis 16.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Tucked away at the end of a residential cul-de-sac in Iowa City, just south of Interstate 80 and growing suburbs, the daffodils, violets and hyacinth in bloom, among the peach, pear, cherry and apple blossoms, Blair Frank tends to the medicinal herb section at the privately-owned Gaia’s Peace Garden with the precision of an urban planner. Far from being a “vacant lot,” the eight-year-old Peace Garden initiative under Frank and his wife Mary Kirkpatrick’s tutelage has emerged as a nationally acclaimed sustainability showcase for Iowa City, transforming 1.1 acres of clay soil into a biodiversity hot-spot, a permaculture demonstrate site, a local food and medicinal herb oasis, and a blueprint for city staff and planners on how to incorporate green spaces and commons into neighborhood development. A solar energy panel powers a pump on a small waterfall as a renewable energy demonstration site; a stone labyrinth guides visitors around the Garden sections, where benches and places have been set up for ...
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9 ideas for an eco-minded Easter 13.4.2017 TreeHugger
This spring holiday is usually marked by meats and sweets, but there are some ways to make it easier on the environment.
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Whole Foods has a big, basic problem it desperately needs to solve 12.4.2017 Washington Post
Whole Foods has a big, basic problem it desperately needs to solve
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With California's bounty just out of reach, one town is nourished by a family farm 10.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

A lot of people in this Sierra foothills town start sentences with “used to be.”

There used to be sawmill jobs. Used to be mining. Used to be a plaque that marked this as the exact center of California — until someone stole it last year.

But so far, the Gnarly Carrot has escaped past tense.

The...

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Climate Change Is Ruining Farmers' Lives, But Only A Few Will Admit It 10.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When Christina Carter started growing vegetables 12 years ago, she looked forward to winters because they offered her the chance to recover from the strenuous growing and harvesting seasons. That’s no longer the case. Summers are hotter and stormier than they used to be, and fall never seems to come. A true winter also seems to be a thing of the past, but that doesn’t mean spring won’t bring the occasional surprise hailstorm. Today, Carter, who owns and operates the Ten Mile Farm  in Old Fort, North Carolina, is managing crops and dealing with repairs and maintenance to her farm year-round. “We used to have December, January and February off,” Carter said with a laugh. Though the lack of an off-season presents the opportunity of feeding people year-round, it comes with many challenges, too. Intense, sudden rainfall can knock out a whole crop, causing carrots to rot in the ground or beans to die out from overly saturated soil. The work days are becoming longer and sweatier. “We have neighbors who’ve lived ...
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By the Numbers: How Business Benefits from the Sustainable Development Goals 5.4.2017 WRI Stories
By the Numbers: How Business Benefits from the Sustainable Development GoalsAdd Comment|PrintThere’s money to be made in solving the world’s sustainability problems. Global Landscapes Forum/Flickr The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have an unexpected champion—forward-thinking business leaders. The Business and Sustainable Development Commission, a group of corporate, finance and civil society leaders, recently released a report showing that achieving the SDGs in just four... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Organic Industry Watchdog Wins Major Antitrust Victory 1.4.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
Cornucopia Institute The French dairy giant, Groupe Danone (Dannon in the U.S.), has announced an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to liquidate its holdings in the largest manufacturer of organic yogurt, Stonyfield, so that its proposed acquisition of WhiteWave Foods can move forward. The original merger deal would have combined the world’s largest organic yogurt brand, Stonyfield, with Wallaby, a rapidly growing organic yogurt label, and the nation’s largest brand of organic milk, ...
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A big pawprint: The environmental impact of pet food 30.3.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Pets can have a large ecological footprint, and their food is a big contributing factor.
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Technology isn't our sole salvation in tackling climate change 29.3.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Mitigation requires systemic social change, not just technological optimism.
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More dirt on General Mills’ sustainable agriculture goals 27.3.2017 GreenBiz.com
General Mill's CSO Jerry Lynch and new sustainable sourcing director, Kevin O'Donnell, tackle ambitious 2025 emissions reduction goals and more.
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Salmon with side effects 23.3.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? German and Chilean scientists are working to answer this question under the leadership of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ). They examined the dissolved organic compounds which enter Chile's rivers from salmon farms, and have published a report in the journal Scientific Reports, warning that these substances are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changing entire biological communities.
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We’re Lousy at Describing Sustainable Food, but it Doesn’t Have to Be That Way 23.3.2017 WRI Stories
We’re Lousy at Describing Sustainable Food, but it Doesn’t Have to Be That WayAdd Comment|PrintPlant-based foods can significantly reduce emissions and help close a 70 percent gap in the amount of food available today and that needed to feed a growing population. Photo by Marek Ziebart/Flickr This article was originally posted on SustainableBrands.com. As Georgetown University linguistics professor Deborah Tannen says, “We tend to look through language and not realize how much power language... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Albertsons looks into the future and sees organic bananas 23.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Albertsons is discussing a takeover of Sprouts Farmers Market, a move by the second-largest U.S. supermarket chain that would mean a deeper push into foods that appeal to a growing segment of shoppers.
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