User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Sustainable Agriculture
Last updated: May 21 2015 12:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Small food makers on fast path to U.S. store shelves, threatening big producers 21.5.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
Small U.S. food manufacturers once toiled for decades to develop a critical mass of fans for their products. Now, an increasing number of privately-held players are going from garage to grocery store in fewer than five years thanks to an erosion of barriers to entry within the food industry. The trend is visible everywhere from gluten-free and organic foods to more traditional fare, according to interviews with half a dozen startups, as well as retailers and industry ...
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The Silencing of Hector Valenzuela 20.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
As the University of Hawai'i was cozying up to GMO giant Monsanto, one of the school's professors says that he was forced to tolerate a climate of "bigotry, retaliation and hostility" for speaking out about the potential risks of genetic engineering. The university disputes his charges. But Dr. Hector Valenzuela is not the only professor at the university who has been harassed for voicing concerns about biotechnology. University of Hawai'i Prof. Hector Valenzuela conducted experiments on organic farming at the university's Waimanalo Experiment Station on Oahu until the university shut down his research. (Photo: Will Caron) Truthout combats corporate power by bringing you trustworthy, independent news. Join our mission by making a donation now! As the University of Hawai‘i was cozying up to GMO giant Monsanto, one of the school’s professors says that he was forced to tolerate a climate of “bigotry, retaliation and hostility” for speaking out about the potential risks of genetic engineering. The university ...
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Women and Biodiversity Feed the World, Not Corporations and GMOs 20.5.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Is organic food worth the higher price? Many experts say no 19.5.2015 LA Times: Business
Kristin DiMarco was heading into a Trader Joe's in West Los Angeles the other day and knew for sure what she wouldn't be buying: anything organic.
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Mississippi Market takes on St. Paul's East Side in biggest venture ever 16.5.2015 Pioneer Press: Most Viewed

At natural foods co-op Mississippi Market, opportunity has knocked in unlikely places.

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The Forgotten Farmers 15.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo Credit: © Dplett It's heartening to see the growing public interest in what we eat and how it's produced. People are waking up to the fact that the Western diet is damaging our health and that industrial farming is effectively destroying our planet. And with climate change looming large on the horizon, a growing global population, and ever-diminishing natural resources, shaping up is in order! But while I'm pleased to see more people making the connections between our food choices, our health, and our impact on the planet, I'm super concerned the food debate is becoming way too polarized. I wrote What The Fork to open up a more moderate dialogue about food and food choice. While I advocate for organic food, I see a rising obsession for certified USDA Organic that is alarming. In other words, anything that doesn't have the organic seal is rejected as "poisonous garbage," and the farmers who produced it labeled as "evil." Take the recent "New MacDonald" video released by Only Organic -- a group ...
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5 Reasons to Be Grateful for Monsanto 15.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We live in a world of contrasting elements and sometimes a direct experience of opposites can help us grow and evolve. For example, loss can teach us about connection, grief can give us an appreciation for joy, a long, cold winter will make us celebrate the coming spring. Last fall I was working on a blog about GMOs, and I really enjoyed researching the topic. I learned some important things about health issues that seemed unrelated on the surface but are actually quite interconnected and essential for all of us to recognize. Monsanto, so often despised on social networks and demonized -- yet it may be providing an opportunity for a much needed dialogue, in effect enlightening us through demonstrating the contrast of opposites. It is fair enough to say that Monsanto opposes the beliefs of those who care about their right to know what is in their food, by pushing back against GMO labeling laws. This giant corporation also stands in contrast to the belief systems of those who believe in heirloom seeds, ...
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Bet You Didn't Know Just How Green These American Breweries Are 15.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 2013 the Brewers Association reported that the U.S. had a total of 2,768 microbreweries, brewpubs and regional craft breweries. While it may surprise you to learn that the total number of craft breweries grew by 15.3 percent between 2012 and 2013, more surprising may be the fact that a large number of those companies also operate environmentally friendly production models. Here is a small list of America's best sustainable craft breweries. Full Sail Brewing , Hood River, Oregon While most breweries use 6 to 8 gallons of water to produce a single gallon of beer, Full Sail Brewing has knocked their usage to only 2.5 meaning they're conserving up to 4.1 million gallons of water a year. They are also very proud of the fact that their brews are made from only four natural ingredients; water, malt, hops and yeast. That means no additives, artificial colors, sugars, syrups, preservatives or fluoride. Full Sail supports its community by donating all spent grains and yeast solids--a combined 5,408 tons ...
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The 'Organic' Game Is On 15.5.2015 Yahoo: Business
Consumers are devouring a record amount of organic products and businesses are cashing in
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Reporter discovers locally adapted gardening philosophies 15.5.2015 Steamboat Pilot
After one full year in Steamboat, I’m still discovering new things on a daily basis. And gardening has been a continuous mystery to me. I’ve heard the name Elkstone Farm around town for a while, but as I was recently reading about their philosophies of gardening, I had to follow my curiosity and see these concepts myself. Earlier this week, I ventured to the oasis nestled behind a hillside just outside town. Following the red dirt road leading to Elkstone Farm, the view of its pond and tranquil environment full of vibrant hues and plants beginning to bloom was a beautiful sight, even on a rainy day. Owner Terry Huffington was inspired to create Elkstone Farm in 2008 with her husband, Ralph Dittman, based upon two key concepts: to respect the agricultural traditions of Strawberry Park and to utilize the land as productively as possible. Traditions of the area come from the valley’s earlier inhabitants in the 1900’s. The area was known for its Remington strawberries, large berries that continued to produce ...
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What Happened After One Family Went Organic For Just Two Weeks 14.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What would happen if you switched from conventionally grown food to organic-only? One family of five found out after participating in an experiment run by Swedish grocery chain, Coop, and the Swedish Environmental Research Institute. It's not news that organic farming beats conventional practices when it comes to the health of the environment. But this small pilot experiment sought to address what kind of immediate difference eating organic food can make inside the body . During the first week of the 21-day experiment, the Palmberg family ate a conventional diet and then each member submitted a urine sample to the SERI laboratory, where analysts found a number of insecticides, fungicides and plant growth regulators. Then, the family switched to an organics only diet, including soaps and personal care items, for two weeks. During the organics phase, the researchers took daily urine samples. The results were dramatic: The pesticide loads in the family members' bodies dropped in ways that were observable ...
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Even in a Drought, California Farms Have a Future - but They'll Need Control of the Food System to Succeed 12.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
(YES! illustration by Jennifer Luxton.) Last month, for the first time in history, California enacted mandatory limits on how much water its residents can use. And yet, as a recent op-ed in The New York Times points out, the state is exporting 100 billion gallons of water a year in the form of cattle feed. That’s right: cattle feed. California’s thirstiest crop isn’t almonds or broccoli or anything else you’ll find in the produce section, but alfalfa. If you eat a steak, there’s a good chance that cow’s diet included some alfalfa hay. But chances are slim that any of that feed came from California unless you get your beef from China, where most of California’s alfalfa ends up. It’s outrageous to say the least. But it’s exactly what we should expect from a food system that is built not to be practical, but profitable. The very dominance of California agriculture is an expression of the same logic. California supplies more than half of America’s fresh fruits and vegetables. Not only are nine of the top 10 ...
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Greenpeace Report Reveals Farmers Are the Most Vulnerable to Health Risks from Pesticides 12.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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In 'Organic Life,' The Making Of America's First Organic Restaurant 12.5.2015 NPR Health Science
Nora Pouillon writes about her lifelong devotion to food in a new memoir, My Organic Life. Her restaurant has been a fixture in the Washington, D.C., food scene since 1979.
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US Dietary Guidelines: Historic Battle for People and Planet 8.5.2015 Health

US Dietary Guidelines: Historic Battle for People and PlanetThe broad public support for sustainability in the scientific recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans has been described as 'unprecedented' according to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Thus far 22,000 public comments have been registered -- almost 20 times that submitted the last time the guidelines were...


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Are Industrial Farms Also to Blame for America's Drought? 8.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If there is a silver lining to be found in the devastating California drought, it's that many more Americans are finally thinking about where and how their food is grown. Historically low water levels have put a squeeze on the state's farmers who produce nearly all of the nation's broccoli, grapes, canned tomatoes and, notoriously, almonds. Until the drought, many of us probably gave little if any thought to almonds beyond eating them. Now, almonds -- and the almond milk made from them -- are the targets of online drought shaming because of their huge water footprint. It takes about one gallon of water to produce a single almond. Almonds aren't the only water hog, though. Consider the beloved avocado: each one takes approximately 60 gallons of water to produce. And a burger? It takes an estimated 660 gallons of water to produce a quarter-pounder. Through the food we put on our plates, California's drought is also America's drought. The good news is that California farmers have proven their talents at ...
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Swedes show how eating organic eliminates a family's pesticide load 8.5.2015 TreeHugger
Thought you didn't care about the pesticides you are piling up from conventionally grown food? This Swedish family's experience may change your mind.
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USDA Organics Head Won't Say Organic Is Healthier 5.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Organic food is one of America's great growth industries: sales are skyrocketing , increasing by double-digit percentage terms year after year as consumers embrace healthier, more environmentally conscious lifestyles. Nearly $40 billion's worth of organic food was sold across the country last year. One key factor behind the explosion of organic produce has been the implementation, in 2002, of the National Organic Program that lays out uniform standards for the foods that can be labeled as USDA-certified organic. But the person in charge of that program, Miles McAvoy, seems not to be totally on board with the idea that buying organic is all that important, at least for human health. In an interview with the Washington Post, McAvoy refused to affirm that organic foods offer any specific health benefits to those who consume them. Asked whether consumers are right to think that "the food is healthier and safer than conventional," he dodged the question. "I am not going to be able to respond to that," McAvoy ...
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Cut Pesticide Use to Boost Yields? It's Worked for Millions of Farmers in Asia and Africa 3.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Training Pakistani cotton farmers in pest management. (Photo: IPRI ) Pesticides are intended to be harmful. They kill pests, diseases and weeds. But some also harm humans and wildlife. Pesticides are a huge global business, worth around US$45 billion . Each year, 3.5 billion kilogrammes of pesticides are applied to food crops and their use is growing. Much use of this use is at best ineffective and at worst outright harmful. In recent research we showed that farmers in Asia and Africa have been able to cut the use of pesticides while boosting crop yields, reducing costs and delivering healthier profits. Even the landscape surrounding the farms benefits. Each kilogramme of pesticide used in agriculture imposes €3-15 (US$4-19) of external economic costs on the environment, wildlife and human health – money spent by water companies to remove them from drinking water, for instance, or the loss of valuable pollinating insects. Any reduction in use, therefore, saves farmers costs, but also benefits the wider ...
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Is organic food safer, healthier? Guy in charge of U.S. organics won't say 3.5.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Is organic food safer, healthier? Guy in charge of U.S. organics won't say
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