User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Sustainable Agriculture
Last updated: Jun 30 2016 22:27 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Cricket chips, dehydrated organs: 'Healthy' snack foods that may be hard to swallow 30.6.2016 LA Times: Health

Chips made from powdered crickets. Milk derived from potatoes. And dehydrated grass-fed beef organs.

These are some of the new health foods coming your way that may be tough to swallow, no matter how seemingly good for you they might be.

Earlier this year, the annual Expo West held in Anaheim brought in...

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Stop worrying about GMOs; it's that organic granola bar that could make you sick 30.6.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Karma can be so cruel. Just think how many times anti-GMO activists have protested against the imaginary risks of food that has been genetically modified. Now a favorite snack of those same protesters, the sacred granola bar, has been found to pose an actual health risk.

Anti-genetic engineering...

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Sustainable Fisheries: OneHealth of Future Food 28.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As a benefit to human and environmental health, sustainable and not linear fisheries must be employed to feed a shrinking world. We must utilize economic stimulus, more regulation in developing world fisheries, and a higher barrier to entry for susceptible categories of farm raised fish to preserve sea protein as a cornerstone of survival. The window to act lies squarely in our laps despite the recourse, potentially catastrophic, being primed for adoption by our kids. 2.9 Billion people around the Globe are reliant on seafood as a main source of nourishment. Now, fished at unmitigated scale - the same practices used in harvesting this crop from once bountiful Oceans are depleting stocks and biodiversity at an alarming rate. The backlash to this will have drastic impact on us in the United States whether you like it or not! This production model of food is not much different than the hunter-and-gather approach employed by our a primal ancestors. Not many give thought as they wolf down their sashimi ...
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A rush of American, seeking gold in Cuban soil 27.6.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

If the U.S. ends its trade restrictions against Cuba, a new supply of sugar, coffee and tropical produce and a new market for American exports could reap more than $1.2 billion a year in sales.
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Organic Vs. Conventional: Everyone Has A Seat At The Table 27.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The organic versus conventional debate has been fueled by attacks from organizations and companies in both fields of farming. The most recent marketing move claiming superiority comes from the Clif Bar Family Foundation. The organization's initiative called Seed Matters includes an animated video condemning genetically-modified seed -- the predominant production method used by today's U.S grain farmers. Reminiscent of past attempts to demonize modern farming methods, the video stars an organic seed taking a dim view of his genetically-modified counterparts. Farmers and others in food and agriculture are justifiably angry about such unflattering and openly hostile representations. As with other assaults on today's agriculture, it might be tempting for farmers and other food system stakeholders who support conventional practices to attack companies like Clif Bar for their inaccurate and inflammatory approach. Even when opinions are outlandish and inaccurate, as is the case with Mr. Seed, attacking the ...
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Photos: He ditched med school, became organic farming pioneer 27.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Forty years ago, Steven Schwenn was a third-year medical student at Mayo Medical School in Rochester when he felt a different calling. It was spring planting season, and Schwenn bought 14 acres of land and began organic gardening.
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The PennEast Pipeline Made Me Do It: Why My Family and I Moved to Solar Energy 25.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Solar Panels, Old and New, Starview Hill Farm, Blairstown, New Jersey "There is one forecast of which you can already be sure: someday renewable energy will be the only way for people to satisfy their energy needs. Because of the physical, ecological and (therefore) social limits to nuclear and fossil energy use, ultimately nobody will be able to circumvent renewable energy as the solution, even if it turns out to be everybody's last remaining choice. The question keeping everyone in suspense, however, is whether we shall succeed in making this radical change of energy platforms happen early enough to spare the world irreversible ecological mutilation and political and economic catastrophe." Hermann Scheer, 1944-2010, former member of the German Parliament and General Chairman of the World Council for Renewable Energy Photovoltaics aka Solar Panels "Drill, baby, drill." First used by Maryland Lieutenant Governor Michael Steele at the 2008 Republican National Convention, later elected chairman of the ...
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Making "Organic" Mean Something 24.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When an animal food product in your grocery store is proudly labeled "USDA Organic," you would think that means the animal had exposure to fresh air, sunshine, and significantly more space to move than on standard non-organic farms. Most people make that assumption . But in reality, the "organic" label provides no clear requirements for either space or outdoor access for most animals. As a result, a growing number of large organic producers are raising animals in conditions virtually indistinguishable from factory farming, including cramped quarters and even painful physical alterations. Why is there such a disparity between the humane conditions we expect for organic farm animals and the cruel treatment many actually receive? It can be partially traced to the explosion of consumer interest in "organic" foods. Organic product sales by U.S. farms increased 83 percent between 2007 and 2012, but the increased production did not come with a corresponding increase in welfare standards. This is clear for ...
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Organic Farming Could Feed The World, If Only We Would Let It 23.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When it comes to organic farming, many in the agricultural industry are on board in theory, if not in practice. And that’s largely because of low crop yields. For many years, the prevailing perception has been that organic farming — which avoids synthetic pesticides or fertilizers , antibiotics and GMOs, and aims to preserve natural resources and biodiversity — cannot produce the sort of yields needed to provide food for the world’s population. While a new report from researchers at the Friends of the Earth admits that crop yields are, on average, currently smaller with organic farming than industrial farming, that doesn’t have to be the case.  The report, released Tuesday by the D.C.-based environmental advocacy group, goes on to argue that crop yields shouldn’t be the only metric by which we should evaluate any given crop’s success. In a conference call Tuesday, John Reganold, a professor of soil science and agroecology at Washington State University, said a crop’s yield is just one of four metrics by ...
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Are Millennials Chocolate Chip-o-crites? 21.6.2016 NPR News
Millennials profess to care about ethical sourcing when grocery shopping. But a study of chocoholics ages 18-35 shows just how different values and behavior can sometimes be.
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Five C's to Change the World 20.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Almost all of our major global challenges are linked to food: what we eat, how it is produced, and all that is wasted. We are beginning to grasp the magnitude and complexity of our broken food system, but not even close to fixing it. No expert, government or individual has the recipe, power or influence to single-handedly change the way the world eats. But no matter how "super wicked" our problems seem, there are some exciting entry points for action. EAT has defined five: commissions, cities, children, chefs and cash. 1. Commissions Scientists have already fed us the facts: unhealthy food kills more people than tobacco and alcohol. One in three of us, worldwide, is malnourished . Almost 800 million are starving, while more than 2 billion are overweight or obese. On the other hand, food is responsible for up to 30% of all greenhouse-gas emissions, and is the single most important cause of deforestation, loss of biodiversity and degradation of marine ecosystems . Still, surprisingly few have studied how ...
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Five C's to Change the World 20.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Almost all of our major global challenges are linked to food: what we eat, how it is produced, and all that is wasted. We are beginning to grasp the magnitude and complexity of our broken food system, but not even close to fixing it. No expert, government or individual has the recipe, power or influence to single-handedly change the way the world eats. But no matter how "super wicked" our problems seem, there are some exciting entry points for action. EAT has defined five: commissions, cities, children, chefs and cash. 1. Commissions Scientists have already fed us the facts: unhealthy food kills more people than tobacco and alcohol. One in three of us, worldwide, is malnourished . Almost 800 million are starving, while more than 2 billion are overweight or obese. On the other hand, food is responsible for up to 30% of all greenhouse-gas emissions, and is the single most important cause of deforestation, loss of biodiversity and degradation of marine ecosystems . Still, surprisingly few have studied how ...
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'Locally Laid': A Humorous Memoir To Cure You Of Farming Fantasies 16.6.2016 NPR News
When Jason Amundsen told his wife he was quitting his job to raise pasture-raised eggs, she was less than amused. Readers, however, will chuckle at the story of their tragicomic path to success.
Pathways of Transition to Agroecological Food Systems 16.6.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Adam Parsons

An alternative vision of farming and food systems has long been upheld by civil society groups and small-scale producers around the world, based on the science of agroecology and the broader framework of food sovereignty. But while many reports and studies have shown how less intensive, diversified and sustainable farming methods can have far better outcomes than today’s corporate-dominated model of industrial agriculture, the question remains as to how we can make the shift towards agroecological systems on a global scale.

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Weather Forecasting and Sustainability Intersect On the Farm 15.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With the release of such cultural touchstones as Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma and Robert Kenner's Food, Inc., the late-aughts of this century saw interest in food systems make the leap from middle-America ag-extension stations to parental gossip sessions in playgrounds from coast to coast. A keyword search for "sustainable agriculture" on the New York Times' website yields 1,366 results since 2000, covering subtopics that range from locavorism to cover-cropping to Walmart's sourcing practices. In this unlikely intersection of agricultural science and popular culture, certain questions seem to dominate the discussion: Pesticides or no pesticides? Local or organic? USDA-certified or farmer's word? Natural or hormone-free or cage-free or free-range? This is a consumer-oriented discussion, designed to answer the (not-uncomplicated) question of, "What should I buy?" And although media coverage of grower-oriented sustainability metrics does exist, there's one factor that's been largely missing from ...
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Harvesting Liberty: Short film explores reintroduction of industrial hemp to US 14.6.2016 TreeHugger
Industrial hemp farming could play a big role in providing economic stability in impoverished areas, creating jobs and businesses for veterans, and growing a sustainable and regenerative agriculture movement.
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National Keep the Hives Alive Tour Brings Urgency to Global Pollinator Decline 14.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Friends of the Earth The Keep the Hives Alive Tour kicks off today to raise awareness about the plight of mass bee die-offs and other pollinators. The tour is organized by beekeepers, farmers, farmworkers, scientists and advocates and will stop in South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina before and during National Pollinator Week, June ...
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Ghana Taps Carbon Markets To Avert A Chocolate Shortage 13.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story first appeared on Ecosystem Marketplace. Click here to view the original. By Tabitha Muriuki In Ghana, cocoa is king : it accounts for almost 10 percent of the country's economy and 30 percent of its exports - but it's also a leading driver of deforestation, for a variety of reasons. To begin with, the cacao tree on which the cocoa bean grows is a ravenous beast that sucks nutrients out of the soil at rates that require massive infusions of chemical fertilizer. On top of that, cacao grows best in filtered sunlight, under shade trees; but more and more farmers have been chopping the shade trees to increase yields in the short-term - largely because of widely-held beliefs that new hybrids thrive in the sun. The result, says Yaw Kwakye, Head of the National REDD+ Secretariat within Ghana's Climate Change Unit, is a perfect storm of practices that could drive up greenhouse-gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation while hastening the end of the country's cocoa industry. "The economic ...
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Two Degrees for Food: Rebuilding the Global Food System 10.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
After the success of the Paris Agreement, I can walk into any room shouting "2°C!" and everyone knows that I am talking about climate change. We have a problem, there is a science-based target to aim for, and we are implementing the solutions to solve it. If I walk into those same rooms and shout "food," people would just look around for lunch. Yet as with climate change, food-related issues are entwined with every development challenge we face. Food insecurity, famine, hunger, nutrient deficiency, distribution and transport issues sit cheek-by-jowl with obesity, over-consumption, food loss and waste -- not to mention the rise of diabetes in adults and now in children. While a child dies from hunger every six seconds, the global weight-loss industry generates close to $200 billion in revenue every year. Our food system is broken. It contributes to climate change, water stress, desertification and ecosystem degradation. It's also a vast contributor to global emissions. According to the IPCC, agricultural ...
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Damning Report Reveals Palm Oil's Human Cost 9.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Palm oil: useful and ubiquitous, it also happens to be one of the most destructive ingredients on the planet. The industry has been linked to mass animal die-offs, widespread razing of rainforests, displacement of indigenous communities, climate change and pollution . Now, according to a new report , the palm oil industry may also be guilty of exploiting some of its labor force, allegedly exposing workers to hazardous chemicals without adequate protection and turning a blind eye to the use of child labor on plantations. Even more, these alleged violations may be occurring in the production of “sustainable” palm oil -- a product supposedly certified as transparent, ethical and environmentally sound, and produced by employees who are “responsibly considered.” “Unfortunately, these results were not shocking to find because they represent the tip of the iceberg of widespread and systemic exploitation and labor rights abuses taking place throughout the Indonesian and Malaysian palm oil sector,” Robin ...
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