User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Sustainable Agriculture
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 01:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Dr. Bronner’s Announces Resignation from the Organic Trade Association and Escalates Commitment to Organic Agriculture and Other Causes 21.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Dr. Bronner's

VISTA, CA – Dr. Bronner’s, North America’s leading natural brand of soap and organic body care products, has resigned from the Organic Trade Association (OTA), citing the association’s betrayal of the consumer-led GMO labeling movement, and general drift away from the core principles that drive the organic movement. The OTA compromised their initial position of opposition to the DARK Act and lent the crucial support that allowed anti-labeling legislators to push that same legislation through the Senate and be signed into law by President Obama this summer.

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Rodale Institute Announces Organic Farmers Association 21.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Rodale Institute, the world’s leading organic agriculture research organization, has launched a new membership organization for organic farmers. The new Organic Farmers Association will exist to provide a voice for organic farmers on policy issues, help organic farmers network and share information, and serve as a resource center for organic farmers to succeed.

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Farmers enlist chickens and bugs to battle against pests 20.9.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
In an effort to turn away from chemical pesticides, which have the potential to damage the environment, some farmers are looking in a new direction in the age-old struggle against pests.
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PCC’s challenge: Stay relevant for a new generation but keep core values 17.9.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

The 11-store natural foods co-op is trying to reach newcomers who may not know much, if anything, about the 63-year-old co-op, and retain its loyal members at the same time.
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Sustainable seafood? My thanks to caring consumers and passionate producers 17.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There are a lot of issues facing the food industry right now - truth in labeling, sustainability, fair trade, I could go on for days. Thanks to guys like Larry Olmsted exposing the problems in labeling, and Michael Pollan addressing what should be recognized as food - we are starting to really think about what we eat. My arena has always been seafood, what we are doing to and for our oceans. We've had an over-fishing problem for a long time, and to combat that, we've seen the rise of farm-raised fish and aquaculture. It's a great idea, but it's brought its own set of issues. Aquaculture may be fairly new, but what many consumers don't realize is that the practice has brought its own set of dangers. Many farming processes, specifically salmon, include the same types of antibiotics and overdosing problems we've been warned about with commercially raised cattle. Crowded pens, sea lice infestations, toxic chemicals used to eradicate weed and algae growth - all symptoms of irresponsible farming practices, all ...
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Another Farm Aid Misstep: Partering with Corporate Agribusiness While Purporting to Support Family Farmers 17.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

On the eve of the annual Farm Aid concert, Saturday in Bristow, Virginia, The Cornucopia Institute, an organic industry watchdog, has filed a formal legal complaint against Farm Aid’s marquee sponsor, Bonterra Organic Vineyards, alleging it misrepresents its products as “organic.” 

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Target explains how it will spiff up its struggling grocery business 16.9.2016 Chicago Tribune: Business
When you head to a Target store to buy groceries these days, here's what the chain hopes you'll see: More organic and gluten-free foods. A wider selection in snack products such as yogurt. Fresher-looking fruit. What you shouldn't expect to see any time soon? A butcher, a deli counter or a ...
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Big Ag pays farmers to go organic 16.9.2016 TreeHugger
Supply can't keep up with demand when it comes to organic, which is why Big Ag is offering to foot the bill.
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How To Be An Organic Pioneer 14.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This past weekend we celebrated the Organic Pioneer Awards at the Rodale Institute, and it gave me a moment to reflect on the past 70 years and what it takes to be a pioneer and create change. But first some context... The change we have created has come in four distinct phases, and we are about to enter the fifth. 1. Invent organic The first phase was when my grandfather, J.I. Rodale, invented the idea of organic. If you put it into scientific language, this is the hypothesis he created: Healthy soil equals healthy food equals healthy people. 2. Prove organic Like any good hypothesis, it must be proven scientifically, which is what we started doing in 1983 with the Farming Systems Trial . As the picture shown above reveals, we have more than proven scientifically that organic is a viable, productive, and profitable way to farm--and the only way to feed people for the long term and mitigate climate change. (It was about 100 degrees inside the barn that night, by the way.) There are still many things left ...
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Dirt Capital seeds financing for ecological farms 14.9.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Former Goldman Sachs real estate developer pivots to help small sustainable farmers buy land.
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Cargill's Jill Kolling on the Midwest Row Crop Collaborative 8.9.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The ag giant is teaming up with PepsiCo, Kellogg, General Mills, Monsanto and Walmart. Here's why.
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How Large-Scale Urbanization Changes The Future Of Food 7.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sustainable urbanization isn't a term that rolls off the tongue. Say it three times fast and you'll see what I mean. But if you care about food waste like I do, it's definitely a term you should know. Sustainable urbanization is so intimately tied to food waste that you can't talk about one without the other. If we don't get it right, we might miss the most sustainable opportunity to feed our growing planet. In fact, getting the food we already grow and produce today onto people's plates instead of the one-third or more that's lost or thrown away could feed everyone that suffers from hunger. But What Happens as Urbanization Continues at a Historic Pace? The world's population has grown to more than 7 billion today and is on a trajectory to surpass 9 billion by 2050. Cities, in particular, are absorbing this growth and experiencing rapid change. Today, about half of the world's population lives in an urban area; by 2050, two-thirds is expected to do so. That's called "urbanization," and we've never seen ...
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Jill Stein tells The Times editorial board why she thinks voting Democrat or Republican makes little difference 7.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

The following is a transcript of Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein’s meeting with the Los Angeles Times editorial board.

Nicholas Goldberg (editor of the editorial pages): Do you want to start with a very brief introduction?

Jill Stein: Yes, so… I’m a medical doctor by training. I’m a...

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Go Easy on the Guacamole - Mexico's Forests Will Thank You 2.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Will Tucker What's small, green, famously healthy, and deceptively destructive? An avocado, believe it or not. The benign-looking fruit has captured worldwide attention in recent weeks after revelations that America's insatiable taste for guacamole is prompting farmers to chop forests in central Mexico - and funding narcoterrorism in the process. After initially disputing the reports, Mexican avocado growers have resolved to make their operations more sustainable - but how? After all, the problem begins with foreign demand, and it extends beyond avocados, as Bolivian chef Kamilla Seidler pointed out at the Aspen Ideas Fest in Colorado, where she described the "Quinoa Effect" that has driven the price of a kilogram of the fashionable grain from $1 to $11 in La Paz - a boon to growers (or, more often, middlemen) but a bust for working class Bolivians who rely on quinoa as a staple food. Source: Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) The solution, it turns out, won't come in the form of a silver bullet ...
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A new era of collaboration for sustainable agriculture 31.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Jenny Ahlen Companies have the opportunity to use their voice to draw attention to issues that matter to their business and to their customers.  Today, a handful did just that – by announcing their commitment to sustainable agriculture. Over the past several months, I’ve spent countless hours representing Environmental Defense Fund in a room with Cargill, General Mills, Kellogg Company, Monsanto, PepsiCo, The Nature Conservancy, Walmart, and World Wildlife Fund. This group makes up the Midwest Row Crop Collaborative (MRCC) – a diverse coalition working to reduce the environmental impacts of commodity row crop production (i.e., corn, soy, wheat, etc.) throughout the Upper Mississippi River Basin. This isn’t just good news for the planet. Implementing on-the-ground solutions that reduce fertilizer pollution and improve soil health can also result in higher yields for farmers, reduced risk of supply chain disruptions for food companies and retailers, reduced air and water pollution, and improved ...
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Greenpeace takes aim at not-so-sustainable seafood 30.8.2016 GreenBiz.com
Sodexo and Aramark lead off a less-than-glowing analysis of the state of sustainable seafood.
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A six-legged snack is the latest food trend in tech world 27.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Enthusiasts — and their financial backers — say tiny, chirping crickets are high in protein and iron and can serve as a sustainable alternative to beef or chicken.
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Steamboat briefs: Steamboat Cocktails with Council slated for Tuesday 27.8.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Steamboat Springs City Council members will host the next monthly Cocktails with Council from 4:45 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30 at Carl’s Tavern, 700 Yampa St. The event, which is open to the public, takes place every fourth Tuesday of the month. Swift Communications to purchase Acres USA Swift Communications will acquire Acres USA, an agricultural publisher and events company based in Austin, Texas. The announcement was made to local staff this week. The purchase is slated to be finalized Thursday, Sept. 1. Acres USA is North America’s oldest, largest magazine covering commercial-scale organic and sustainable farming and more. The company has also published more than 100 books on ecological farming and hosts educational events and conferences for its audiences. “We are thrilled to welcome Acres USA to Swift,” said Bill Waters, chief executive officer of Swift Communications. “Acres USA, through world-class conferences, book publishing and a monthly magazine bring together the best among the thought ...
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Sustainable alternative to methyl bromide for tomato production 25.8.2016 Environmental News Network
Following the phase out of methyl bromide, scientists continue to explore effective, viable, and more sustainable options for vegetable crop production. Among nonchemical alternatives, anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is considered to be one of the most promising methods. ASD has been determined to be effective with a range of crops and environments against several soilborne fungal and bacterial plant diseases, plant-parasitic nematodes, and weeds.
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Forget GMOs. Pesticides Pose the Real Risk 23.8.2016 American Prospect
A tractor spreads chemicals on his crop as Hastings, Florida, resident Brian Hunt watches.    The latest statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture reveal that Americans’ appetite for locally grown, organic food is growing. Consumers want to know where their food comes from and what’s in it. Most polls show that the vast majority of Americans also support mandatory labels for genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Nearly half of Americans think scientists have found risks associated with eating GM foods even though they haven’t, according to a recent survey by the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. “People don’t know very much about the science, and they don’t know that GMOs have been in the food supply for 20 years,” says William Hallman, who ran the survey. “They just know they don’t like it.” Last month, after years of contentious debate, President Obama signed legislation requiring the first national GMO labeling standard. (Labeling advocates aren’t happy with the ...
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