User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Security :: Access
Last updated: Nov 15 2018 18:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Who Gets to Tell Stories About Poverty? 15.11.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  It should not be all that difficult to report on economic inequality. It’s a fixture, after all, of modern American life. And yet, the journalism industry, charged with analyzing and conveying news of wage stagnation, persistent poverty, and downward mobility, has itself crumbled alongside much of the middle class. Over the past several decades, more and more journalists have been laid off, while the rates paid freelancers have fallen, too. As the chasm of inequality has only continued to grow, the very journalists who cover it have not always been able to escape it. In 2012, when the country was still reeling from the economic recession and when reporting about inequality was needed perhaps more than ever, author Barbara Ehrenreich started the Economic Hardship Reporting Project (EHRP). The idea was to change the media landscape, and support reporters—by then, many low-income and working-class ...
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Food stamps for soda: Time to end billion-dollar subsidy for sugary drinks? 29.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
SNAP provides nutrition assistance for about 42 million Americans, but critics say now is the time to restructure the $70 billion annual program in a way that promotes healthier food choices.
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Private Equity Pillage: Grocery Stores and Workers At Risk 26.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Since 2015 seven major grocery chains, employing more than 125,000 workers, have filed for bankruptcy. The media has blamed “disruptors”—low-cost competitors like Walmart and high-end markets like Whole Foods, now owned by Amazon. But the real disruptors in this industry are the private equity owners who were behind all seven bankruptcies. They have extracted millions from grocery stores in the last five years—funds that could have been used to upgrade stores, enhance products and services, and invest in employee training and higher wages. As with the bankruptcies of common household names like Toys “R” Us, private equity owners throw companies they own into unsustainable debt in order to capture high returns for themselves and their investors. If the company they have starved of resources goes broke, they’ve already made their bundle. This is all perfectly legal. It should not be. The bankrupted private ...
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'Public charge' rule blamed for 'chilling effect' among immigrants 24.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
People are reportedly going without benefits that they or their children need for fear of hurting their immigration status.
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U.S. Farm Sector Braces For Protracted Trade Fight 28.9.2018 Wall St. Journal: US Business
CEO Ken Sullivan said a resolution to the standoffs that have resulted in retaliatory tariffs from China and Mexico isn’t occurring quickly enough.
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Mayor Jim Kenney: Solving Philly's poverty issues takes consistent, relentless effort | Opinion 19.9.2018 Philly.com News
We must be mindful however, that there is no single solution, and that results of our work may take years, even decades to fully materialize.
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How your neighborhood can impact your life expectancy in Philadelphia 19.9.2018 Philly.com News
Today in Philadelphia, someone living in Society Hill is expected to live approximately 88 years, while someone living in a North Philadelphia neighborhood is expected to live only 68 years, according to a study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
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Around the country, incomes are rising. In Philly, they're falling. 13.9.2018 Philly.com News
Philadelphia continues to be encumbered by its reputation of having the highest rate of poverty among the 10 most-populous U.S. cities, as well as the highest rate of deep poverty, a measure of people living at 50 percent of the poverty line or less.
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UCare offering discounts on healthy foods to some members 12.9.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
UCare said it will begin offering its 30,000 non-group health plan members hundreds of dollars in healthy food discounts this month.
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News on hunger, deprivation set to come during 'Poverty Week' 10.9.2018 Philly.com News
Perhaps more than any other single time during the year, early September is when America takes stock of its poorest citizens.
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Trump Launches Aggressive Poverty Disinformation Campaign 10.9.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana Demonstrators march outside the U.S. Capitol during the Poor People's Campaign rally at the National Mall in Washington Just how many Americans are poor? The Trump administration wants you to believe that just 3 percent of the U.S. population is poor. The Council of Economic Advisers made that claim in a  little-noticed report  published earlier this summer, as part of a coordinated effort to justify harsh new restrictions on government assistance programs. This bad-faith estimate emerged more from a desire to hurt the poor than to engage in honest policymaking on the issue of poverty. In March, the Congressional Budget Office found that  nearly half of social safety net payments  are going to people that the federal government once considered "middle class." Think about that: At a time when even the middle class is starting to look poor, the administration argues that not even the poor are poor so that federal officials can move to cut programs that both groups now rely on to ...
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Trump Administration moves to penalize immigrants for using government benefits 20.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The idea has already sparked warnings about consequences for immigrants and the nation's health care system.
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Anti-poverty crusaders fight to cut taxes for mobile-home owners 11.8.2018 Philly.com News
Low-income people who live in mobile homes in the Honey Brook area have been getting extra help that could allow them to stop over-paying property taxes.
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Making California’s Farmers Markets Accessible to All 6.8.2018 American Prospect
Elias Funez/The Union via AP A busy farmers market in Nevada City, California Last month, a complex government contracting decision created tumult in the farmers market world by threatening the ability of  nearly 2,000  markets across the country to accept Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, formerly known as food stamps. However, thanks to a resilient state program, only one of those markets was in California. The U.S. Department of Agriculture runs a program in which private contractors provide software and Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) processing equipment to farmers markets. But as the Prospect  reported  last month, the federal government abruptly changed its contract, forcing one major software company to announce it was going out of business during prime market season. The nonprofit Farmers Market Coalition began to  crowdfund  for markets to buy new equipment, and the National Association of Farmers Market Nutrition Programs and the  state of New Y ork   hashed  out ...
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How SNAP and Medicaid Work Requirements Will Hurt Workers 2.8.2018 American Prospect
trickle-downers.jpg On any given day, you’re likely to interact with a lot of people who work in the low-wage labor market. They’re the laborers you pass on the street, the retail clerks in a shop you frequent, the cooks or wait staff at a restaurant you like. They might be your family, friends, and coworkers. Maybe you yourself work in one of these occupations—after all, many millions of Americans do. While conservatives might paint adults who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly called food stamps) benefits and Medicaid as idle people who don’t want to work, the data don’t validate that assumption. Adults who rely on SNAP and Medicaid for help paying for their groceries and health care are often those same low-wage workers. But their work is largely volatile and unstable, and it comes without such key work supports as paid sick and family leave and affordable child care. That’s why the recent policy push to institute harsh work requirements in both SNAP and Medicaid is ...
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Illegal grill operation, dead mice in a trap close Philadelphia eateries 1.8.2018 Philly.com News
Between July 15 and July 31, inspectors closed 51 facilities for various violations.
Is the war on poverty 'a success,' as the Trump administration proclaims? 27.7.2018 Philly.com News
But up in Fairhill, Philadelphia's poorest neighborhood, you might ask: If this is victory, what does defeat look like?
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States have a role to play on war on poverty (which, by the way, isn't over) | Editorial 25.7.2018 Philly.com News
The federal government has made it clear it won't help, so state governments need to step up.
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Changes to food stamps could deny benefits to thousands 23.7.2018 Philly.com News
A bill in the U.S. House of Representatives would mandate enhanced work requirements for people receiving SNAP, denying benefits to those who work fewer than 20 hours a week.
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The SNAP Crisis at Farmers Markets Across the Country 19.7.2018 American Prospect
Edwin Remsberg / VWPics via AP Images Crates of green peppers, cucumbers, peaches and tomatoes for sale at a farmer's market in Westminster, Maryland  It’s a sunny Friday afternoon in the North Side neighborhood of Pittsburgh, where the North Side farmers market sets up each week. As shoppers mill about to music that’s wafting over from a nearby festival, a long line has formed at the tent operated by Just Harvest, a local anti-hunger nonprofit. Surrounded by a couple dozen vendors selling fresh produce, baked goods, cheeses, jams, and jellies, Just Harvest staff assist recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, previously called food stamps) so that they’ll be able to use their SNAP benefits to buy any fresh food item at the market. But farmers’ business at the North Side market and other such markets across Pittsburgh—and the thousands of SNAP participants that buy from them—are currently threatened by an Agriculture Department contracting decision. Because of a change in ...
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