User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Distribution :: Farm-To-Table
Last updated: Nov 13 2017 17:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Kumeyaay poet who’s disrupting nature poetry 13.11.2017 Current Issue
Tommy Pico merges natural and personal history of the arid West from Brooklyn, New York.
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Farm-to-School Movement Fights for a Foothold in Corn Belt Cafeterias 18.8.2017 Truthout.com
As the movement for a local and ethical food system continues to gain traction, school food is slowly but surely becoming a focus in the fight for change.  School districts serve lunch to 30.4 million students a day through the USDA's National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The NSLP provides cash subsidies and USDA foods to enrolled schools, which in turn provide free and low-cost meals for qualifying students. In total, meals served through the NSLP amount to as many as 5 billion per year . Due to the program's scale and the influence of Big Ag interests, the lion's share of food served through the NSLP has typically been sourced from large-scale producers, transported from afar and heavily processed. The resulting meals are often less than nutritious. In 2009, the ground beef the USDA bought from five major meatpackers and distributed through the program failed to meet the quality standards of most fast food restaurants. But two initiatives, the farm-to-school movement and the Good Food Purchasing Policy ...
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Sonic launches part-mushroom, part-beef burger 27.6.2017 TreeHugger
It's not a veggie burger. But there's a lot less beef in it than normal.
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Farm to cafeteria table: The new local food frontier 13.10.2016 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Institutions embrace their growing potential to rebuild local economies and deliver healthful food.
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Meatless Monday: Farm to Table, From the Ground Up 29.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Beyond Meat 's bleeding beetburger could not exist without beets.  Were it not for the butternut squash, Purple Carrot' s butternut squash tacos would be bare, bereft tortillas. Dazzled as we are by tech-savvy food innovation, as New Orleans' recent Farm to Table Experience reminds us, what we eat doesn't start in the lab, it starts from the ground up.  F2Te, a weekend of presentations (including, ahem, mine), growing and kitchen demos, social events, chefs challenges and hands-on workshops brought people who care about the source of their food, whether they're growers, chefs, vendors, public servants, authors, artisans, educators, nutritionists or just people who care about what they eat. We got to connect with each other and reconnect with the source of our food.  In an increasingly app- and meal kit-driven market, a lot can get lost between farm and table, including authenticity . The thing is, we like pretty. Whether you're a celeb chef on Chopped or just take pics of your dinner on your i-phone, ...
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Canadians are demanding a bold new future for our public postal system 26.8.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

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Elon Musk Revolutionized Cars. His Brother Wants To Do The Same For Food. 23.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK ― Last month, Elon Musk laid out his “ master plan ” to transform Tesla into a clean energy giant. In a 1,483-word blog post , he outlined plans to meld his automobile company with SolarCity, the country’s largest solar installer, to create a one-stop shop for electric cars, batteries and solar-panel roofing. He’s not the only Musk with a grand vision. For the last 14 years, Kimbal Musk, Elon’s younger brother, has been quietly waging his own battle against industrialized food. While Elon built a tech empire in California, the younger Musk moved to Colorado and founded The Kitchen, an ambitious family of restaurants committed to bringing sustainably grown, locally sourced, healthfully prepared food to the American heartland. His empire of eateries ― whose fare includes homemade kale chips, quinoa grown in Colorado and lamb sourced from Boulder’s Crego Livestock farm ― stretches from Boulder and Denver in Colorado, to Chicago. By the end of August, it will include a new location in Memphis, ...
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Not Trump Country 23.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
“I need to run into the house for a minute.” Jim told me. “Wait here with the yaks.”  There were two Tibetan yaks in the pen. An adult and a child. The adult was sauntering slowly toward me. “Is it safe?” I asked, as the yak approach at a speed slightly slower than a riding lawn mower going up a hill. Jim chuckled. “He’s charging you right now,” he joked and then headed off toward the house with the long strides of a man who walks many miles each day.  The small yak has was munching on grass. I pulled out my GoPro to try and get a selfie with him. This is what happened. His name is Goliath. Here are a few more photos of he and the other yaks, just because they’re so damn cute. < Meeting Jim Watson Jim Watson is the personification of Kalispell — a small city of 22,000 in the Flathead Valley of northeast Montana surrounded by lakes and mountains — as I came to know it during a recent assignment there. ( Check out my photoessay from the trip here. ) Jim is a well-read rancher, hunter, entrepreneur,  and — ...
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Meatless Monday: Cool Beans, Hot Jazz and More Ways to Celebrate the International Year of Pulses 1.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Nutrition, sustainability , versatility, affordability, sheer deliciousness -- there's so many reasons to love dried beans, especially now, the  International Year of Pulses . I've been celebrating all year, blogging, teaching and presenting about them, including later this month at Farm to Table Experience in New Orleans, but my favorite way to celebrate is to cook and share them --a pot of pulses brings the fun. I'm soaking red beans now to have a pot of red beans and rice ready for August 4, Louis Armstrong's birthday. The jazz great so loved New Orleans and the city's signature dish, he'd sign autographs, Red beans and ricely yours. Like many bean dishes, RBR, was created as dish to satisfy the belly and stretch the budget. Honoring culinary traditions are part of the pleasure of cooking and eating for me, but so are riffing, innovating and reinterpreting, doing with ingredients what musicians do with melodic form -- kitchen jazz. Pulses welcome that. Their meaty but meatless chew invites me to ...
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Why The Farm-To-Table Movement Will Keep On Growing, According To Dan Barber 15.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If you consider yourself a fan of the farm-to-table dining experience, you’re in luck because it’s here to stay, according to acclaimed chef  Dan Barber .  Barber, who has made a name for himself in the farm-to-table movement with his upscale New York restaurant, Blue Hill , said there’s been a “dramatic shift and a consciousness” about wanting to know what we’re eating and where it comes from.  “Once you taste a truly delicious carrot ― a carrot that’s not grown from 3,000 miles away and shipped to you in mediocre condition. Or a tomato, or a lamb that’s really on 100 percent grass and beautifully raised ― once you taste that and have that experience, you don’t go back,” Barber said.  The food movement is “one of the more exciting” social movements that’s happening, he said, and it will only continue to grow. This video was produced by Will Tooke -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be ...
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Sacramento Group Rescues 40,000 Tons Of Food Waste, Turns It Into Fuel 12.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In Sacramento, farm-to-table is a nice start, but it doesn’t stop there. Once the food’s consumed, it’s then turned into fuel. Created through a public-private partnership with the University of California, Davis and the Energy Commission, the Sacramento Biodigester is keeping leftovers out of landfills and converting them into fuel that can power school buses, waste disposal trucks and fleet vehicles, according to the California Energy Commission.  Altogether, it diverts 40,000 tons of food waste from landfills, according to Energy Vision. It’s a pretty sizable operation considering that organic waste makes up about 30 percent of what’s dumped into landfills, according to CleanWorld, one of two companies that helped open the Biodigester.  “ Farm to Fork to Fuel to Farm is an effort to turn what would otherwise be a waste stream – which is food waste – into a regional resource,” Tim Taylor, of the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, told Yale Climate Connections.  Take Action ...
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From the Ivory Tower Kitchen: The Real Victims of the Farm-to-Fable Controversy 29.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For approximately two months, Laura Reiley, the food critic of the Tampa Bay Times dove away to uncover some of Tampa's filthiest secrets, blatant lies, and deceit about the authenticity of food sourcing in that region of the country. In a four-part series covering restaurants , farmers' markets , abusing restaurant case studies , and a guide aimed at helping us be better informed consumers, much to the chagrin of abusers and consumers alike, a gauntlet was laid. It is clear that there is nothing unique about Tampa and that it is a systemic problem. By my logs, about a month into her investigation, I received a call from Laura who was interested in getting opinions from my wife and me on the issue of greenwashing. I hadn't heard of that term before, but quickly understood that when applied to what we were talking about, it referred to the practice of disinformation disseminated by a food service organization so as to present an environmentally responsible public image. I recall our conversation on March ...
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A Local Apple a Day... Benefits Kids, Farmers and the Environment 22.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
These days many of us are looking to get more fresh, local, and sustainably grown food onto our plates. Now we have a chance to ensure that New York students have more access to local produce too. The New York State legislature is reviewing a proposal that would reward school districts for sourcing locally grown ingredients in school lunches. The proposal, which is the first of its kind, would reimburse schools an extra five to twenty-five cents per meal for dedicating more of their purchasing budgets to local food. It presents schools with a unique opportunity to increase the quality of kids' lunches while also supporting New York State's farmers. It could be a powerful tool in enhancing kids' understanding of the food system , and it will have the greatest impact if it's paired with effective, innovative nutrition education. We all agree that children need and deserve high quality food. Too often, though, we overlook the role that school lunches play in helping to introduce kids to healthful ...
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If Farm-To-Table Eating Is Cool, What About Toilet-To-Tap Drinking? 17.3.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
When any given water supply grows scarce, there are only so many ways to adapt our day-to-day, water-reliant lives: Use less water or somehow recycle it. In the case of the serious drought conditions that continue to grip much of the state of California and areas in other states, many of the short-term solutions have focused on the former. But increasingly, water recycling -- the treatment and purification of wastewater -- is on the table.  Critics have derided  the trend -- which comes as food sustainability, encapsulated in the farm-to-table philosophy,  gains popularity   -- as “toilet-to-tap” drinking. But a  new survey released this week finds a surprising number of Californians are on board with the concept. The online survey of 3,000 California voters, conducted by Edelman Intelligence and commissioned by Xylem, a water technology company, found that 42 percent of respondents were “very willing” to use recycled water in their daily routines. That includes showering, brushing their teeth and, yes, ...
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Meatless Monday: St. Patrick's Day Dubln-Style -- Dedicated, Passionate Vegan Community - 1, Corned Beef and Cabbage - 0 14.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Who cares about green beer? Last month, I was blissed to find soy milk and almond milk in every coffee shop in Dublin. Every eatery had a vegan option or could craft one without fuss and didn't look at me like I was crazy. I even talked aquafaba meringues with a waiter--big news in a country where dairy and meat have traditionally been a big part of the plate and a big part of the Gross National Product. I presented at Happy Food Cafe , Dublin's first and only all-vegan cafe, where the beetburger- chowing crowd hungered not just for vegan eats but to create vegan consciousness and vegan community. Passionate about animal welfare, they seemed slightly embarrassed all of Ireland hasn't embraced it, too. Maybe it's not happening as fast as Dublin's vegan crowd would like -- honey, I'm familiar with the feeling --but the move to vegan has been happening in big ways and small. Dublin had its first-ever vegfest in November and Dublin VegFest 2016 is in the works now, spearheaded by the mighty Pears Hussey and ...
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92 Percent Of All Restaurant Meals Have Crazy Calorie Counts 25.1.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
You probably don't expect every meal you eat at a restaurant to contain a large number of calories. Sure, the occasional fast food cheat meal might be excessive, but your local farm-to-table place feeds you well, right? According to new research from Tufts University, nearly all restaurant meals -- whether from a fast food joint or the luxurious confines of a Michelin-reviewed kitchen -- contain way too many calories.  The study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, measured 364 restaurant meals from both large chain and local restaurants and a variety of cuisines, finding that 92 percent of them exceed the recommended calorie requirements for a single meal.  What's more, one third of these meals exceeded the energy requirement for an entire day. And, just as a reminder, the meals didn't include typical restaurant accompaniments, like drinks, appetizers or dessert.  We need to take control of our plates. The researchers did not go into why restaurant dishes are so ...
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The Revival of the Locavore 8.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The diet of the modern-day "locavore" isn't a new concept, though the word only recently came about. Before society got carried away with all its glittering supermarkets and high-yielding factory farms, food was produced locally and eaten locally, with a few exceptions. But wait. What's a locavore, exactly? Is it different from an omnivore or carnivore? Translated from Latin: locus: a place, spot, or position vorare: to devour, swallow Literally, locavore translates to "one who eats only local food." This movement is rapidly growing in the United States, especially among the young professionals we used to call yuppies. Locavores often hunt (locally, of course) to have access to the foods they've grown accustomed to eating while standing by their farm-to-table beliefs and convictions. They're educated, they're concerned about sustainability, and they're really sick of social media. They are the new hunters. Championing the movement are some unlikely characters, including hunter Jesse Griffiths, a man one ...
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Locavores aren’t loved by everybody 17.12.2015 High Country News Most Recent
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The Quest to Build the World's Most Sustainable Town in the Middle of the Panamanian Jungle 23.11.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's 10 am on a Tuesday in the Tres Brazos jungle, a jagged two-hour trek outside Panama City. Aaron Prairie leads a group of biology students on a nature hike, using a machete to hack his way through an overgrown trail. Max Cooper cuts long strips of plywood with an electric saw powered by a solar generator, the beginnings of an open-air thatch hut he'll eventually build by hand. A few yards away, Ani Dillon sits cross-legged on the second floor of a similar hut, sketching out a prototype for a custom-designed luxury tent. Jake Cardoza is on his hands and knees in the adjacent permaculture farm, planting a baby banana tree. In the nearby kitchen, also fashioned as an open-air rancho, Brigitte Desvaux chops onions, which she'll saute for dinner along with with fresh katuk harvested from the farm. Three miles up the steep dirt path that leads out of the jungle and into the 500-person community of San Miguel, Jennifer Theone teaches English to first graders at the local school. At the dental clinic down ...
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Where Does "Eating Local" Mean Fried Pickles and Buffalo Bourgoignon? 22.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If "eating local" in your region means guaranteed year-'round access to a rainbow of uber-fresh ingredients -- well, check your privilege. Because you're probably in California. Or Croatia. Or some other temperate breadbasket. You're lucky. You're spoiled. And you're not in South Dakota. On a recent trip to Sioux Falls, SD, I examined what eating local means in an oceanless flatland whose winter windchills reach 40 below zero, where tornadoes uproot orchards and where freezing temperatures can last from mid-September until mid-May. Neither Sioux Falls' booming economy nor its 3.7 percent unemployment rate can mellow this friendly town's merciless seasons or make olives, avocados, nuts, grapes, garlic, broccoli, spinach, celery, citrus fruits or octopus thrive here. Agriculture is ubiquitous in the Great Plains, but it's mainly on an industrial scale: This landscape isn't quaintly dotted with charming little biodynamic vineyards and organic heirloom-lettuce fields. Outsiders are quick to dis this vastness ...
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