User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Production :: Gleaning
Last updated: Sep 18 2019 01:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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An Indigenous way of life for these California tribes breaks state laws 17.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In Mendocino County, ‘guerilla gatherers’ risk fines and jail time to keep food culture alive.
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A global guide to 'restoration hotspots' for tropical rainforests 2.8.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
The five countries with the largest potential are Brazil, Indonesia, India, Madagascar and Colombia.
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Tropical forest restoration is a global, high-value opportunity 19.7.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Forests have valuable ecological services and economic benefits, and this is where we should focus.
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Treaty rights prevail in Supreme Court 21.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In a 5-4 vote, the court disagreed that Wyoming’s statehood nullified a Crow Tribe hunting treaty.
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Coyote diets; anaerobic digesters; poachers caught on camera 13.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
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Indigenous educators fight for an accurate history of California 29.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The Golden State is ignoring a history of violence against Native Americans.
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To understand the climate crisis, look to Indigenous stories 18.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Julie Cruikshank Today is Earth Day, an event that becomes more important every year as the climate crisis escalates. Our collective failure to address climate change makes it clear that mainstream society needs to think about nature differently. Indigenous communities are disproportionately affected by climate change. But Indigenous stories also suggest a different way of thinking about the natural world, as populated with sentient beings that have as much agency and political standing as humans do. In this excerpt from the forthcoming book The Nature of Canada , Julie Cruikshank shares her experiences of listening for different stories from her decades of work with Indigenous communities in the Yukon. At a modest one-day conference on early human history in southwest Yukon, held in Haines Junction in 1982, scientists, historians, archaeologists, and members of local First Nations discussed the environmental factors affecting regional history. Late in the afternoon, Mrs. Annie Ned, then in her eighties, ...
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The disease devastating deer herds may also threaten human health 9.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Scientists are exploring the origins of chronic wasting disease before it becomes truly catastrophic.
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Across Appalachia, historic coal towns are looking to the outdoor economy for their next act 6.3.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Can recreation and tourism benefit the regional economy and fill a gap left by the declining coal industry — sustainably?
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It’s time to start eating roadkill 2.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Salvaging meat in Alaska is commonplace. Can it catch on in the Lower 48?
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Eating roadkill is an Alaska tradition. What about the Lower 48? 2.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Salvaging meat is catching on across the West, thanks to shifting laws and beliefs.
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Hunting faces an ethical reckoning 18.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Gruesome social media videos show how far modern hunting has drifted from its roots.
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Indigenous and Rural Women Conserve Mother Earth and Empower Their Communities 7.3.2018 Truthout.com
Women's rights and gender equality are crucial for not just women, but also for their communities and the environment. Increasing women's leadership in natural resource management, for example, is not only beneficial for biodiversity but also increases livelihood opportunities for women, thus improving their ability to plan for their families and resulting in positive outcomes for their communities. On this International Women's Day, we bring you a photo essay about Indigenous and rural women and their innate connection to nature. Women's rights and gender equality are crucial for not just women, but also for their communities and the environment. Women play a key role in the conservation of biodiversity and forests. A growing body of evidence shows that increasing women's leadership in natural resource management and governance is not only beneficial for biodiversity but also empowers women, increases their livelihood opportunities, improves their ability to plan for their families and results in ...
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Why Silicon Valley should take ag tech more seriously 7.2.2018 GreenBiz.com
Barely 2 percent of all U.S. venture capital investments in 2017 were focused on solving agricultural challenges.
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A Federal Court Could Save Yellowstone's Grizzlies From the Trump Administration 10.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
The Northern Cheyenne Tribe and a coalition of environmental groups are asking a federal court in Montana to throw out the Trump administration's decision to remove grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park from the endangered species list. They want the grizzlies protected from trophy hunters while federal wildlife officials complete a review of their decision to delist the bears. A grizzly bear and cubs play in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, on June 3, 2017. (Photo: Wolverine 9 5 ) The following article could only be published thanks to support from our readers. To fund more stories like it, make a donation to Truthout by clicking here! The Northern Cheyenne Tribe and a coalition of environmental groups are asking a federal court in Montana to throw out the Trump administration's decision to remove grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park from the endangered species list -- a move that has paved the way for trophy hunts of the iconic animals. Delisting the Yellowstone ...
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In rural Colorado, can art provide an economic engine? 30.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A small town invests in affordable housing for the creative sector.
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Radical revolution 27.11.2017 BBC: Business
This simple yet transformative piece of technology made civilisation possible.
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Site C exposes economic folly of flooding farmland 15.11.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David Suzuki As many countries move away from big hydro projects, B.C.'s government must decide whether to continue work on the Site C dam . The controversial megaproject would flood a 100-kilometre stretch of the Peace River Valley and provide enough power for the equivalent of about 500,000 homes . The BC Utilities Commission , an independent body responsible for ensuring British Columbians pay fair energy rates, found the dam is likely behind schedule and over budget, with completion costs estimated at more than $10 billion. In a "high impact" scenario, it may go over budget by as much as 50 per cent. The dam has faced court challenges and political actions by Treaty 8 First Nations and farmers whose land would be flooded. Treaty 8 First Nations stand to lose hunting and fishing grounds, burial sites and other areas vital to their culture and sustenance. West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations demonstrated the devastating environmental impacts Site C will have. The Peace Valley's land and waters ...
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The fast food industry is co-opting venison 8.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Farm-raised deer can be dangerous for wild game and bypass the art of hunting.
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Canada geese give hunters the slip by hiding out in Chicago 24.10.2017 Environmental News Network
 It’s open season for Canada geese in Illinois from mid-October to mid-January. Unfortunately for hunters, Canada geese are finding a new way to stay out of the line of fire. Rather than being “sitting ducks” in a rural pond, they’re setting up residence in the city.
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