User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Production :: Sustainable Agriculture
Last updated: Jun 14 2017 19:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
1,612 to 1,631 of 2,886    
Why Shopping Our Way to Sustainability Won't Work 23.5.2011 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Most shoppers don't pay much attention to environmental factors. They're busy, ignorant, or they just don't care. Which makes me believe we can't count on them -- and their current shopping habits -- to bring about a sustainable food system.

Why Shopping Our Way to Sustainability Won't Work
Also found in: [+]
Joanna Dolgoff, M.D.: 14 Foods To Buy Organic 20.5.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If consumers get their five daily servings of fruits and veggies from those that are most contaminated, they could consume an average of 10 pesticides a day.
Also found in: [+]
Want a better organic garden? Call out the soil-critter army 19.5.2011 Gristmill
by Robert Lalasz. Cross-posted from Cool Green Science . There are 1 billion bacteria in a single gram of soil. (Give or take a few million.) But how can you get that army—and its insect friends, like the two-inch Jerusalem cricket pictured to the right—to help you grow bigger veggies and prettier flowers? There’s nobody better to ask than Nature Conservancy soil ecologist Sophie Parker, who recently turned Grist on to the fascinating (and sometimes scary) world of soil organisms . I asked Sophie to give us some tips to make our gardens grow even better—through the power of microbes ... Q. How does this work? Why are microbes so important to good gardens? A. Bacteria, fungi, and other tiny soil microbes have a variety of ways of making a living, and many of their activities enrich the soil. First off, they are the Earth’s natural recyclers—decomposing complex substances into smaller compounds that can be used by plants. They do this by ...
Also found in: [+]
California schemin’: How a fake organic fertilizer bamboozled farmers and watchdogs alike 19.5.2011 Gristmill
by Samuel Fromartz. It’s no secret that the organic food industry has seen explosive growth, taking only a mild drubbing through the recession and then continuing its assent. At the heart of that growth has been trust—consumers are willing to shell out more bucks for organic because the food’s been grown without synthetic chemicals, with that claim verified from farm to market. Yet two major cases of federal fraud have been filed in the past six months, rocking the California farming world and alleging that probably millions of pounds of produce sold as organic over several years weren’t worthy of the label. So why haven’t you heard about this? Because the shady practices came from a side of the farming world that few shoppers think about: the fertilizer industry. And the real dupes weren’t consumers but organic farmers. In March, Kenneth Nelson Jr. was indicted by a federal grand jury on 28 counts of mail fraud as part of long-running scheme to ...
Also found in: [+]
Ancient Hawaiian Farms 18.5.2011 Green Lifestyle and Sustainable Culture News - ENN
The original settlers of Polynesia migrated through South-East Asia and Indonesia across Melanesia, before settling the Polynesian islands beginning in 1000 BC. Hawaii was one of the last island groups to be settled. Archaeological evidence indicates the first Polynesians arrived in Hawaii from the Marquesas between 500 and 700 AD. Hawaii has often been thought of as an earthly paradise. Still people must live and eat. A pattern of earthen berms, spread across a northern peninsula of the big island of Hawaii, is providing archeologists with clues to exactly how residents farmed in paradise long before Europeans arrived at the islands.
Also found in: [+]
Another danger of non-organic farming: Exploding watermelons 18.5.2011 Grist News
by Jess Zimmerman. People opt for organically-farmed food for all different reasons, but here's one of the more compelling ones we've seen: Agricultural chemicals can make watermelons explode .  Chinese watermelon crops just had an unfortunate run-in with the growth accelerator forchlorfenuron, which makes plants' cells divide faster to pump up growth rates. Supposedly forchlorfenuron can bump up harvest schedules by two weeks and increase fruit size by 20 percent. But if farmers spray too late or in the wrong conditions, acres of melons explode like "landmines" in a scene of carnage that one farmer said haunted his dreams. This is, of course, not the first food safety issue China has faced recently, although it may be the only one to be prefigured by a  racist 80s comedian . China has also been flooded with food contaminated by melamine, cadmium, bleach, borax, dye, and birth control chemicals -- all because of lax or corrupt production practices, intended to ...
Also found in: [+]
With Economy Down A Cesspool, Green Product Sales Are Doing What? 18.5.2011 TreeHugger
With Economy Down A Cesspool, Green Product Sales Are Doing What?
Also found in: [+]
Jim Cochran: Sustainability is for People, Too: Why We Need Fair Labor Rights in Organic Farming 18.5.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Our global, industrial food system is causing a slow erosion of the rich complexity that used to exist in farming communities around the world.
Also found in: [+]
Converted Diesel Truck To Be Greenhouse on Wheels for School Kids 17.5.2011 TreeHugger
Converted Diesel Truck To Be Greenhouse on Wheels for School Kids
Also found in: [+]
Slow Money NYC Presented 1st Entrepreneur Showcase and Resource Exchange This Weekend in Brooklyn 16.5.2011 TreeHugger
Slow Money NYC Presented 1st Entrepreneur Showcase and Resource Exchange This Weekend in Brooklyn
Also found in: [+]
Time To Overhaul Our Nation's Farming Systems? 13.5.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's time to overhaul the Farm Bill. That's the message conveyed in a recent policy paper featured in "Science" magazine. The authors of the paper,...
Also found in: [+]
Documentary Dives Into World of Sustainable Shrimp Farming (Video) 13.5.2011 TreeHugger
Documentary Dives Into World of Sustainable Shrimp Farming (Video)
Also found in: [+]
Factory farms the only way to ‘feed the world’? Not so, argues Science paper 12.5.2011 Gristmill
by Tom Philpott. To “feed the world” by 2050, we’ll need a massive, global ramp-up of industrial-scale, corporate-led agriculture. At least that’s the conventional wisdom. Even progressive journalists trumpet the idea (see here , here , and here , plus my ripostes here and here ). At least one major strain of President Obama’s ( rather inconsistent ) agricultural policy is predicated on it. And surely most agricultural scientists and development specialists toe that line ... right? Well, not really. Back in 2009, Seed Magazine organized a forum predicated on the idea that a “scientific consensus,” analogous to the one on climate change, had formed around the desirability of patent-protected genetically modified seeds. If I must say so, my own contribution to that discussion shredded that notion. If anything, a pro-GMO consensus has formed among a narrow group of microbiologists—the people who conduct gene manipulations to develop novel ...
Also found in: [+]
Glenn Hurowitz: Girl Scouts Censor Criticism of Cookies' Ties to Big Food 12.5.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Americans love the Girl Scouts. But instead of using their power to move big agribusiness companies to do good, CEO Cloninger has instead chosen to cynically defend them.
Also found in: [+]
Pam Marrone: Natural Pesticides? Large-Scale Farmers Turn to Safer Products to Keep Their Plants Healthy 10.5.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With the population booming and demands for development being made on our arable land, we've reached a dilemma: How do we provide more food to more people using fewer resources?
Also found in: [+]
Using Technology To Grow Diverse, Polyculture Food Systems 10.5.2011 TreeHugger
Using Technology To Grow Diverse, Polyculture Food Systems
Also found in: [+]
Ronnie Cummins: What's Wrong With Local Food? Local and Organic Food and Farming: The Gold Standard 7.5.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Beyond the greenwashing and co-opting of the term, what does "local" food and farming really mean? What is the impact of non-organic local food and farming on public health, nutrition, biodiversity, and climate?
Also found in: [+]
Bounty hunting: an inside look at a successful farmers market operation [VIDEO] 7.5.2011 Gristmill
by Daniel Klein. Last spring, I had the pleasure of following the farm-to-market process with one of the “successful” upstart organic farms in Minnesota. Laura and Adam from  Loon Organics  let me film and work through their Friday-Saturday operation. I had been idealizing the idea of starting a farm: seeing the beautiful produce stacked up at the market made me want to take out a loan, buy 50 acres, and start my own little operation. But after a day with the folks at Loon Organics, the frantic reality of running a diversified farm comes into focus: Related Links: Monsanto-tied scientist abruptly quits key USDA research post Organic farming just as productive as conventional, and better at building soil, Rodale finds Study: Organic chicken carries significantly lower salmonella ...
Also found in: [+]
I’ve seen the future and I can’t afford it: Marketplace’s botched ‘feed the world’ story 7.5.2011 Grist Magazine
by Tom Laskawy. In a recent report entitled “ The Non-Organic Future ,” public radio’s Marketplace program considered the challenge to agriculture of feeding a world population estimated to reach 9 billion by 2050. It was, to be frank, a terrible piece of journalism. Short, virtually fact-free, and weakly reported, it gave pride-of-place to soil scientist Pedro Sanchez of Columbia University. To his credit, Sanchez is a well-intentioned scholar dedicated to reducing world hunger. However, he sees his mission through the lens of conventional ag. In essence, Sanchez is nothing short of an evangelist for the policy of handing out fertilizers, pesticides, and hybrid seeds to developing world farmers. Reporter Adriene Hill allowed Sanchez to state, without the need for such things as corroborating facts, the following: Pedro Sanchez: If you ask me point blank whether organic-based farming is better than conventional, my answer is no. There are just too many of us, we just ...
Also found in: [+]
Diversity is Key to Sustainable Farming, So Why's It So Damn Hard? 6.5.2011 TreeHugger
Diversity is Key to Sustainable Farming, So Why's It So Damn Hard?
Also found in: [+]
1,612 to 1,631 of 2,886