User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Policy
Last updated: Mar 06 2020 17:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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25 badass women shaking up the climate movement in 2020 6.3.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
In honor of International Women's Day, we recognize courageous executives, investor advocates and policy visionaries who are role models for any gender.
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Dollar General, Sephora, Lowe's among 7 most improved retailers addressing toxic chemicals 3.2.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sales of products marketed as sustainable are growing 5.6 times faster than conventionally marketed products.
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Seed preservation is vital for a sustainable food system 27.1.2020 GreenBiz.com
"Our seeds are more than just food for us. Yes, they are nutrition. But they’re also… spirituality," says Electa Hare-RedCorn, a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and a Yankton descendant. "Each seed has a story and each seed has a prayer."With a background in social work, Hare-RedCorn was brought on to the Pawnee Seed Preservation Project in 2012 as a seed-keeper, to carry the conversation forward with youth and families. The project, she says, has become a movement.
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From sustainable to regenerative: bold business moves to transform the agriculture system 16.1.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Regenerative practices could bring huge win-wins for farmers, food companies and the environment, implementing them will involve overcoming wide-ranging barrier.
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Early-career public-sector sustainability professionals reflect on VERGE 19 (Part 1) 19.12.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Insightful on mobility. Actionable ideas for addressing food waste. Youth activism. What inspired CivicSpark leaders at this year’s conference.
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Why supermarkets are key to a cooler climate 18.12.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Refrigeration management is an urgent need, and a potent opportunity.
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These 21 projects are democratizing data for farmers 25.11.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
On fields across the world, phones, tablets, drones and other technologies are changing how food is grown. Through these devices, artificial intelligence (AI) — technology able to perform tasks that require human intelligence — may help farmers use the techniques they already know and trust on a bigger scale. And big data — data sets that reveal telling patterns about growth, yield, weather and more — may help farmers make better decisions before crises strike.
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Can better broadband and big data save rural America? 21.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Independent farms need better internet to survive, let alone to compete with the large agriculture industry.
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Global climate regulation looms on the horizon. Are banks and insurers ready? 8.10.2019 GreenBiz.com
Regulatory scrutiny of sustainability risks has only just begun.
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An Indigenous way of life for these California tribes breaks state laws 17.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In Mendocino County, ‘guerilla gatherers’ risk fines and jail time to keep food culture alive.
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Organic food health benefits have been hard to assess, but that could change 28.8.2019 GreenBiz.com
Organic growing is proven to be better for biodiversity and chemical exposure, but is the food actually more nutritious?
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3 startups hacking food to crack the climate crisis 12.8.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Miyoko’s and other plant-based entrepreneurs are using food to fight the climate crisis.
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Ideas for feeding the world without destroying it 2.8.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
There are many ingredients in the solution, ranging from plant-based diets to regenerative agriculture.
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U.S. agriculture needs a 21st-century New Deal 10.7.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
How can we give power back to farmers — and out carbon back into the ground?
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7 ways for cities to slash plastic pollution 18.6.2019 GreenBiz.com
Let's send community cleanup days to the trash heap.
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Farmers turn to prisons to fill labor needs 12.6.2019 High Country News Most Recent
With immigration numbers low, the agriculture industry looks to another form of disenfranchised workers.
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How regenerative land and livestock management practices can sequester carbon 7.6.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
General Mills' CSO on how animal agriculture can be regenerative, too.
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Scientists have declared a biodiversity crisis — here's what that means for business 8.5.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
A ground-breaking UN report yesterday revealed scale of threat facing the natural world.
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Cancers are preventable but won't be if it requires curbing the profits corporations reap from sickness 10.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn It is now generally agreed upon by health specialists that many cancers are caused either by exposure to radiation or by carcinogens that have been spewed into the environment. In contrast, relatively fewer cancers can be traced to defective genes inherited from our parents. Although cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity are not nearly as prevalent as those caused by exposure to environmental toxins, they do sicken thousands of people. Radioactive spent fuel from nuclear power plants has risen to a global stockpile of 260,000 tonnes, and is growing by some 10,000 tonnes a year, according to the International Atomic Agency. The incidence of many forms of cancer has been found to be significantly higher in the vicinity of nuclear plants. But the World Health Organization estimates that, although radioactivity is a serious threat in some places, a significant number of cancers are now the result of exposure to environmental toxins . Sales of chemicals, including the most toxic, have increased ...
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The UCP health platform: mostly spin, some two-tier medicine, and scraps of red meat for the base 29.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Jason Kenney's health-care policy announcement yesterday was a typical conservative political speech -- a mish-mash of anodyne sentiment, misleading spin, market-fundamentalist nostrums, scraps of red meat for the base, cheap shots at the federal government, terrible ideas he'll implement if he gets the chance, and even a couple of good ones he'd probably ignore. However, it was almost entirely delivered in a reasonable, even soothing tone of voice. So you had to listen carefully and make frequent use of your political decoder ring to understand the bad stuff. But there was a bit of a bombshell at the end -- a barely disguised pitch for full-on, two-tier, cash-for-care medicine in the final two minutes. Kenney employs competent political advisers. So how did that slip past the spinmeisters? I don't know about you, but when Kenney started rambling on about the so-called Chaoulli decision it sounded to me as if his mouth got jammed in motor mode and no one on his staff had the presence ...
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