User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Systems :: Global Food System
Last updated: Jul 19 2016 21:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The ABCs of genetically modified crops 19.7.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tuesday, July 19, 2016 Like this column? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. In recent months, there have been a number of announcements related to genetically modified (GM) crops. It's these events that have inspired me to write about GM crops now. Genetic modification is the introduction of new traits to an organism by making changes to its genetic makeup -- essentially by manipulating DNA. In recent months, there have been a number of announcements related to genetically modified crops. So, what actions are being taken in Canada and internationally to expand the debate about GM ...
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Monsanto Tries to Build a Society of GMO and Pesticide Devotees, One Child at a Time 19.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
On October 14, 2015, the International Food Information Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation released a free, 38-page, downloadable lesson plan called " Bringing Biotechnology to Life: An Educational Resource for Grades 7-10 ."   The International Food Information Council is a  front group  funded by some of biggest names in biotech and junk food: Bayer, Dow, DuPont, Coca-Cola, Kellogg, Nestle  and more . The American Farm Bureau Federation, according to  SourceWatch , is a "right-wing lobbying front for big agribusiness and agribusiness-related industries that works to defeat labor and environmental initiatives, including climate change legislation." The organization is adamantly against GMO labels, and even  spoke out  against Roberts' and Stabenow's deal for being too lenient. The lesson plan created by the International Food Information Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation is deceptively innocuous until Lesson 7, which includes the theme, "Where would we be without 'GMOs'?" In ...
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Avoid 'Miracle' Rice, Just Eat a Carrot! 16.7.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Vandana Shiva

Golden rice is a false miracle. It is a disease of nutritionally empty monocultures offered as a cure for nutritional deficiency. In fact, golden rice, if successful, will be 400% less efficient in providing Vitamin A...

Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution, died on September 9, 2009. Alfred G. Gilman died on December 23, 2015. Both were Nobel laureates and now both dead. Gilman was a signatory to a recent letter condemning Greenpeace and its opposition to genetic engineering.

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Keeping Secrets From Consumers: Labeling Law a Win for Industry-Academic Collaborations 15.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
You've heard the mantra over and over - there are no safety concerns associated with genetically engineered crops. That refrain, music to agrichemical and biotech seed industry ears, has been sung repeatedly by U.S. lawmakers who have just passed a national law that allows companies to avoid stating on food packages if those products contain genetically engineered ingredients. Sen. Pat Roberts, who shepherded the law through the Senate, dismissed both consumer concerns and research that has fed fears about potential health risks related to genetically engineered crops, in lobbying on behalf of the bill. "Science has proven again and again that the use of agriculture biotechnology is 100 percent safe," Roberts declared on the Senate floor on July 7 before bill passed. The House then approved the measure on July 14 in a 306-117 vote. Under the new law, which now heads to President Obama's desk, state laws mandating GMO labeling are nullified, and food companies need not clearly tell consumers if foods ...
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Want to Reduce Your Food Loss and Waste? New Guidance Can Help. 13.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Paul Bulcke , Chief Executive Officer, Nestlé SA, and Dr. Andrew Steer Around the globe, about one-third of all food produced for human consumption goes to waste. It rots, gets lost in transport or is simply left on our plates. The impact of this loss extends beyond just food: Production of food that is wasted uses 24 percent of all agriculture-related water, causes 8 percent of all human-created greenhouse gas emissions, and costs consumers, farmers and businesses up to $940 billion per year. Last year's Sustainable Development Goals, signed by more than 193 countries, included a target to halve food waste by 2030, while some businesses have set even more ambitious deadlines. In 2015, The Consumer Goods Forum - a coalition of more than 400 of the world's largest manufacturers, retailers and service providers - resolved that its members should halve food waste from their own operations by 2025. One major hurdle to meeting these commitments has been a lack of consistent guidance. The recent Global ...
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Corporate Meat's Takeover through TTIP 13.7.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

The Institute for Trade Policy’s European Office, along with international group Compassion in World Farming (CIWF), German member of Via Campesina—Arbeitsgemeinschaft bäuerliche Landwirtschaft e.V. (AbL) and PowerShift launched their new report Selling Off the Farm: Corporate Meat’s Takeover through TTIP today with a panel discussion and a press briefing at the European Parliament.

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Interdependence, Sustainability, and a Sense of Place 11.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The global economy, global trade, global tourism, and immigration are here to stay. The technology of inexpensive communication, GPS, bar codes, cheap computing, containerized shipping, and a host of other innovations guarantee that supply chains will remain global. Global supply chains ensure that the food and other manufactured goods we need are made as efficiently and effectively as possible. We are part of a global economy, and if you want to see the economic impact of isolation all you need to do is look at North Korea and Iran. The market forces that push the global economy have more political potency than the nostalgic nativists pushing in the other direction. That could change, but I doubt it. That's because in addition to the economic power of the global economy, young people have grown up with inexpensive, instantaneous communication and access to global travel. They find exposure to foreign cultures, foods, and people to be interesting and exciting. Here in America, we also have people like me ...
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Biodiversity, GMOs, Gene Drives and the Militarized Mind 10.7.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Vandana Shiva

A recent report from the National Academy of Science of The United States, titled "Gene Drives on the Horizon: Advancing Science, Navigating Uncertainty, and Aligning Research with Public Values," warns:

“One possible goal of release of a gene-drive modified organism is to cause the extinction of the target species or a drastic reduction in its abundance.”

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If Agroecology Is So Great, Why Aren't All Farmers Doing It? 9.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
After a half century of pioneering work by farmers and scientists, agroecology has finally penetrated international policy circles . This is due to agroecology's widespread success on the ground and the tireless efforts of agroecologists, food activists and policy advocates determined to break corporate agriculture's chokehold on the politics and the purse strings of our food system. Last month, Friends of the Earth (FoE) published Farming for the Future: Organic and Agroecological Solutions to Feed the World - which was released on the heels of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems' (IPES) report, From Uniformity to Diversity: A paradigm shift from industrial agriculture to diversified agroecological systems. The two publications reflect a widespread push by civil society to advance agroecology as a solution to the rural poverty, hunger, erosion, agricultural pollution and greenhouse gas emissions attributed to industrial agriculture. Extensively referenced, the reports ...
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Senate Advances GM Food Labeling Bill That Would Actually Weaken State Rules 8.7.2016 Truthout.com
Activists display a sign in the March Against Monsanto that took place on May 25, 2013 in San Francisco, California. (Photo: Steve Rhodes ) Legislation that would upend state laws mandating labels for genetically modified (GM) foods passed a key procedural vote in the Senate. The bill, which would create a nationwide system for identifying some GM foods, cleared a motion to end debate on Wednesday, by a 65-32 vote. A simple majority is now needed for the legislation to pass a full Senate vote, which is expected before the week is over. Vermont, Maine, Connecticut, and Alaska have all passed legislation in recent years forcing companies to overtly label products of transgenic agriculture. They will be ordered to scrap their rules if the legislation passes both houses and is signed into law by President Obama. Vermont's law, the first of its kind in the nation, took effect on July 1. As  The Hill  noted, the initiative would force food companies to "create QR codes that consumers scan with a smartphone to ...
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8 Natural & homemade insecticides to save your garden without killing the Earth 8.7.2016 TreeHugger
These natural and DIY pesticides are effective at helping to rid your crops of harmful critters, but safe enough to keep from poisoning you and your family.
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Activists Expose Monsanto's Senate Lackeys Minutes Before DARK Act Vote 6.7.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Just before a controversial genetically modified (GM or GMO) labeling bill came up for a cloture vote in the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, food and consumer advocates dropped over $2,000 on the chamber floor in a symbolic protest against what they are calling the "Deny Americans the Right to Know" (DARK) Act.

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We're Finally Waking Up To The Horrific Ways We Treat The Animals We Eat 6.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When it comes to animal suffering in the United States, farm animals are in a category of their own. True, hundreds of thousands of dogs and cats are euthanized each year in shelters. Plenty of other animals are killed to produce clothing or are used in lab tests, circuses or theme parks. But all of them combined don't add up to even a half percent of the animals killed for food each year. This vast disparity is not reflected in how Americans spend their charity dollars. Quite the opposite. Americans give well over $1 billion to animal welfare groups each year. Only a tiny sliver of that money, about four-fifths of 1 percent, goes to nonprofits devoted to protecting factory-farmed animals. Drawing attention to this imbalance is a burgeoning nonprofit called Animal Charity Evaluators . Its goal is to educate everyday animal lovers (and charity donors) about how to most effectively stretch their dollars to help the most animals. "The vast majority of Americans do not want animals to suffer," said Jon ...
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Tyson's Pollution Pathways: from Factory Farms to Fouled Waters 6.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With the passing of July 4th, summer is officially in high gear in America. Perhaps more than any other time of year, this is when we enjoy clean water -- swimming at the beach, fishing in a creek, kayaking down a river, or sailing on a lake or bay. Unfortunately, corporate agribusiness is imposing a heavy - and growing - toll on America's waterways. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, agriculture is the probable cause of polluting more than 145,000 miles of rivers and streams, along with over 1 million acres of lakes, bays, and more. Last year, the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico was the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined-- the largest since 2002 . And now, agribusiness is even threatening our drinking water - with incidents from Toledo to Des Moines , from Wisconsin to Washington State. How did we get to the point where companies selling us food are polluting our water? The answer lies in the industrialization and concentration of their agribusiness operations. Factory ...
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How the Corporate Food Industry Destroys Democracy 5.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Protesters rally for GMO labeling in Vermont, January 16, 2014. Vermont implemented a law to label goods containing genetically engineered ingredients on July 1 this year and it's facing full-out attack from Monsanto. (Photo: Bob Farnham ) On July 1, Vermont implemented a law requiring disclosure labels on all food products that contain genetically engineered ingredients, also known as genetically modified organisms or GMOs. Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food and Water Watch, hailed the law as "the first law enacted in the US that would provide clear labels identifying food made with genetically engineered ingredients. Indeed, stores across the country are already stocking food with clear on-package labels thanks to the Vermont law, because it's much easier for a company to provide GMO labels on all of the products in its supply chain than just the ones going to one state." What that means is that the Vermont labeling law is changing the landscape of our grocery stores, and making it easier than ...
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2016 World Food Prize: More Genewashing? 5.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Yet again, the World Food Prize has lent its global pulpit to the biotech brigade. On Tuesday, June 28, Drs. Maria Andrade, Robert Mwanga, Jan Low, and Howarth Bouis were crowned the 2016 World Food Prize Laureates during a ceremony at the U.S. State Department. Titled "Biofortification Pioneers", their combined efforts have been heralded as potentially impacting over 10 million rural poor across Africa, Asia and Latin America through biofortification, the process of scientifically breeding vitamins and nutrients into staple crops. The significance of two African World Food Prize Laureates cannot be understated. They are, as the website states, "working on solutions to tackle malnutrition in Africa, for Africa". But financial sponsors of the technology have largely come from outside of Africa -- the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Bank, the United States Department of Agriculture, the United Kingdom Department of International Development, the International Fertilizer Group and large ...
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Here's The Draft Democratic Party Platform 2.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
38 Bring Americans Together and Remove Barriers to Create Ladders of Opportunity 39 40 Democrats believe that everyone in America deserves the chance to live up to their God-given 41 potential. We will work to break down barriers standing in the way of Americans and replace 42 them with ladders of opportunity. 43 44 Racial Justice 45 Democrats will fight to end institutional and systemic racism in our society. We will challenge 46 and dismantle the structures that define lasting racial, economic, political, and social inequity. 1 Democrats will promote racial justice through fair, just, and equitable governing of all 2 institutions serving the public and in the formation of public policy. We will push for a societal 3 transformation to make it clear that black lives matter and there is no place for racism in our 4 country. 6 Racial Wealth Gap 7 America's economic inequality problem is even more pronounced ...
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Are Venezuela's food shortages a sign that food security is still a risk? 1.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From technological advancements in food production to our increasingly interconnected globe, many factors have reduced the risk of wide-scale famines. However, the current food shortages in Venezuela, which have plunged the nation into chaos, highlight that the threat of world hunger is not over for good. To discuss the future of food security, we talked to Stephen Devereux , a development economist from the University of Sussex. ResearchGate: In this article , researcher Dr. de Waal argues that the time of famines may be over. What's your view on this? Stephen Devereux: I think Alex de Waal is probably right that the time of catastrophic famines is over, meaning those famines that used to kill hundreds of thousands or even millions of people. But that doesn't mean that we won't have more minor and moderate scale famines in the future. It is important to remember that we have had quite a few famines since the last 'great famine' in Ethiopia in 1984 that Alex mentions in his article. Already in the 21st ...
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Report: Tyson #1 Water Polluter Among Corporate Agribusinesses 30.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Tyson Foods, one of the world’s largest meat and poultry producers, dumps more toxic pollution into the nation’s waters than any other agribusiness, and produces the most animal manure of five major companies assessed nationwide, a new report said today.
 

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EU Grants Temporary Extension to Glyphosate Licence 30.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Global Justice Now Responding to the news that the European Commission had granted a temporary licence to the controversial chemical glyphosate, Heidi Chow, a food campaigner with Global Justice Now said: "Extending the licence for glyphosate for 18 months means another 18 months of hundreds of thousands of tons of a ‘probably carcinogenic’ chemical being sprayed on our parks, our farms and in our ...
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