User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Systems :: Global Food System
Last updated: Dec 17 2014 23:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Seeds of Truth: Vandana Shiva and The New Yorker 17.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout can only survive through reader support - click here to make a tax-deductible donation and help publish journalism with real integrity and independence! (A response to the article " Seeds of Doubt" by Michael Specter in The New Yorker) I am glad that the future of food is being discussed, and thought about, on farms, in homes, on TV, online and in magazines, especially of The New Yorker’s caliber. The New Yorker has held its content and readership in high regard for so long. The challenge of feeding a growing population with the added obstacle of climate change is an important issue. Specter’s piece, however, is poor journalism. I wonder why a journalist who has been Bureau Chief in Moscow for The New York Times and Bureau Chief in New York for the Washington Post, and clearly is an experienced reporter, would submit such a misleading piece. Or why The New Yorker would allow it to be published as honest reporting, with so many fraudulent assertions and deliberate attempts to skew reality. ‘Seeds ...
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Orangutan's Horrific Death Underscores Need for Brands to Use Certified Palm Oil 15.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The world's largest orangutan rescue organization, Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOSF) reported the horrific killing of a female orangutan this month. She was found in a palm oil plantation that belonged to a subsidiary of the Makin Group of Indonesia. You can read the full story here but in short : The BOS Foundation in Nyaru Menteng found more than 40 shotgun pellets in the body of an adult female orangutan delivered by the Central Kalimantan Conservation of Natural Resources Authority (BKSDA) on Thursday morning. The team did not manage to save her life. The poor orangutan also suffered broken legs and arms although the press release did not specify whether these were a result of the violence inflicted upon her. This is not the first time that rescued orangutans were found with multiple shotgun pellets. A similar story in 2012 had a male orangutan shot sixty two times. The rapid expansion of palm oil plantations has been identified as a key threat to the survival of orangutans. Renowned ...
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Farmers and Eaters Lose, Corporate Money Wins in Budget Deal 13.12.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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GMO Labeling Activists Protest Bill to Preempt States’ Rights to Label GMOs 12.12.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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With Help From USDA, Factory Farms 'Masquerading' Products as Organic 12.12.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Investigation: “Factory Farms” Producing Massive Quantities of Organic Milk and Eggs 11.12.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Farmers, Consumers Challenge Monsanto-Backed GMO Bill Designed to Keep Public in the 'DARK' 10.12.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Groups Rally Against Legislation To Keep Consumers in the Dark about GMOs 10.12.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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GMO Contamination Denial: Controlling Science 9.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists have been experiencing blatant suppression of GMO research. (Image via Shutterstock ) Did you ever think that investigation of the potential dangers of putting GMOs (genetically modified organisms) into food would be based on objective research? Or that unbiased reviews of research by academic journals would chart a steady march toward scientific truth? If so, you would be very wrong. Through all of its phases, scientific research is subject to repression, manipulation and more insidious forms of control that push it toward a profit-based consensus. Scientists have been experiencing blatant suppression of GMO research. (Image via Shutterstock ) Did you ever think that investigation of the potential dangers of putting GMOs (genetically modified organisms) into food would be based on objective research? Or that unbiased reviews of research by academic journals would chart a steady march toward scientific truth? If so, you would be very wrong. Through all of its phases, scientific research is ...
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Palm Oil and Extreme Violence in Honduras: The Inexorable Rise and Dubious Reform of Grupo Dinant 8.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
As one of the fastest growing global commodities, palm oil has recently earned a reputation as a major contributor to deforestation and, therefore, to climate change. Decades ago with Standard Fruit, Honduras was the archetype of the banana republic; today, with Dinant, it's an oil palm republic, characterized by land grabs and violence against peasants and indigenous people. A Corporation Dinant worker repairs an irrigation system for oil palms in the Bajo Aguan region of Honduras' northern coast, August 26, 2011. The violence over land titles in Bajo Aguan is the most volatile example of the social divide that burst into view a few years ago. (Photo: Edgard Garrido Carrera / The New York Times) As one of the fastest growing global commodities, palm oil has recently earned a reputation as a major contributor to tropical deforestation and, therefore, to climate change as well. About 50 million metric tons of palm oil is produced per year - more than double the amount produced a decade ago - and this ...
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Reversing Global Warming, Hunger and Poverty: Supercharging the Global Grassroots 5.12.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Groups to Rally Against Legislation to Keep Consumers in the Dark 5.12.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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'If We're Going To Go Hungry Here, We Might As Well Be Hungry In Our Own Homes' 4.12.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
ISTANBUL -- For millions of Syrians, a simple food voucher distributed by the United Nations' World Food Program is the only thing ensuring they won’t starve. But on Monday, the humanitarian organization responsible for feeding 6 million at-risk Syrians announced it was slashing food aid meant to feed 1.7 million people, citing a grave shortfall in funding. Now, aid groups warn that the threat of hunger could prompt more child marriages, sexual exploitation, displacement and even refugees returning to war-torn Syria. Early this week, refugees in neighboring Lebanon and Jordan received text messages from WFP saying that they would no longer receive food assistance. “We deeply regret that WFP has not yet received funds to reload your blue card for food for December 2014,” a text sent to Syrian refugees in Lebanon read, according to WFP. “We will inform you by SMS as soon as funding is received and we can resume food assistance.” What began in 2011 as a rebellion against the regime of Syrian President ...
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Memo to McDonald's: The Climate Deserves a Break Today 2.12.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In the fall of 1960, my parents took my little brother and me to the first McDonald's in the Cleveland area. It looked like a spaceship, with bright yellow arches on either side of a gleaming white building adorned with red, horizontal stripes. In front was the chain's signature sign topped by Speedee the Chef -- Ronald McDonald's predecessor -- holding a neon placard emblazoned with "15¢," the price of a hamburger. Needless to say, my brother and I were very excited. Sure, we'd been to Royal Castle and Manners Big Boy, but McDonald's seemed a lot cooler. After sampling one of those flash-frozen, 15-cent burgers, however, I wasn't lovin' it. On the way out of the parking lot, I distinctly remember saying to my parents, "That place is never going to make it." Boy, was I wrong. A half century and untold billions of burgers later, McDonald's is the world's most profitable fast-food chain. In 2012, its 12,600 U.S.-based restaurants alone boasted $35.6 billion in sales -- nearly three times more than its ...
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Black Elephants, Black Swans, and Tomorrow's Fish 1.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Is it a bit much to say that we are in the midst of a Food Revolution? I suggest that depends on how you view the current conditions on your plate, in your family, in your community, in our nation. Much like the distinction between hearing and listening, what any of us see is related to what you are looking for: climate change observers and bell ringers line up on one side; climate change deniers line up on the other. A 'Black Elephant' as was explained to Thomas Friedman from his New York Times report of the recent World Parks Congress, is "a cross between a 'black swan' (an unlikely, unexpected event with enormous ramifications) and 'the elephant in the room' (a problem that is visible to everyone, yet no one still wants to address it)..." Black Elephants exist in most any sector in which inertia, denial, and other fear-based drivers are stronger than the desire to take actions involving significant change. This nation currently has been willing treat aquaculture as if any fish farmer from any other ...
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Organic Food Activists Take Thanksgiving Fight to Monsanto's Front Lawn 27.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Agricultural and Food Controversies 25.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Most of us have heard that eating beef is one of the worse things we can do for the planet. Yet as we ponder the choice of arugula over Romaine hearts, we may also hear that these vegetables are sprayed with more pesticides than grain crops. So perhaps we move on to organic until we learn that organics too use pesticides, and that the production method may not make the most efficient use of our scarce resources . And so it goes, comparing the carbon footprint of local to free range, asking waiters whether there's a GMO in our soup, all while speculating whether the Farm Bill is the cause of obesity. Where is one to turn to adjudicate the conflicting messages we hear about food and agriculture? Large agribusinesses have a lot to say on these issues, but their predictable messages about feeding the world easy to dismiss. Journalists and non-profits with earnest, academic sounding names might appear a bit more credible, but their constant drum roll of fear and paranoia, undoubtedly appealing to a certain ...
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Can biomimicry tackle our toughest water problems? 24.11.2014 Current Issue
With floating islands and other inventions, eco-entrepreneur Bruce Kania thinks so.
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Efforts to Curb Destructive Palm Oil Plantations Brings Together Strange Bedfellows 23.11.2014 Truthout.com
Will corporations and activists join forces to end deforestation in Indonesia? September brought good news for the world’s forests with the unveiling of the New York Declaration on Forests at the UN Climate Summit. The Declaration, which pledges to end global deforestation by 2030, was signed by 130 governments, including the US, Germany, Indonesia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Perhaps most significantly, it was also backed by commitments from 40 major food corporations to eliminate palm oil grown on deforested land from their supply chains. That’s a big deal, given that palm oil has been the single largest driver of tropical deforestation in recent years. When the medical establishment deemed trans-fats heart-unhealthy in the mid-1990s, demand for the supposedly more benign palm oil soared, increasing nearly six-fold since the year 2000. Palm oil is now used in nearly half of all foods on supermarket shelves, added to everything from breakfast cereals to margarine to potato chips. It is ...
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Is the Grass-Fed Really Greener? Beef Production in the Americas 23.11.2014 Truthout.com
In the Americas, three nations prevail as leading consumers and producers of beef: the United States, Brazil, and Argentina. From burgers to filet mignon, beef is often considered a staple food, even a delicacy. Its consumption is deeply ingrained in some cultures, but only a few understand the impact of industrial demand of cattle products. Most people are not aware that beef production is directly responsible for producing vast levels of greenhouse gases and expanding deforestation, especially in the Amazon forest region. In fact, in the past 25 years forests with an area the size of India have been cleared in Central and South America.[ 1 ] Although demand for beef has stagnated in the U.S. and certain Latin American countries, worldwide consumption continues to expand, and producers in the Western hemisphere are eager to supply. In fact, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) predicts that beef production and consumption will double by 2050, a situation that can ultimately be costly to the ...
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