User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Systems :: Local Food Systems
Last updated: Feb 05 2018 15:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A tale of two housing crises, rural and urban 5.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
How one Indigenous family is navigating two very different housing problems.
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What White People Can Do for Food Justice 29.1.2018 Truthout.com
People of color have been working for food justice for decades. They need resources. Chef Nadine Nelson, creator of Master Cooks Corps train-the-trainer program, says white people in the food movement should ask: What are you doing to hold yourself accountable to people of color? Best-selling author Mark Bittman prepares lunch in Washington, DC, on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Photo: Nikki Kahn / The Washington Post via Getty Images)   Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! It is possible that the rich and famous can offer more to society than glimpses into their opulent lifestyles. The cult of celebrity today goes beyond our desire and admiration of superstars' expensive clothes, cars, and houses. We want to know where they stand on important issues that impact our lives, like racism, sexual violence, the environment, food and land reform. To our consolation, some of them are actually using their platforms to stand ...
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Here are 5 ways climate became part of the 2018 Davos dialogue 29.1.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Despite the U.S. government's silence, plenty of world leaders and corporate chieftains are speaking up.
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Why Climate Change Is Worsening Public Health Problems 26.1.2018 Truthout.com
With your support, Truthout can continue exposing inequality, analyzing policy and reporting on the struggle for a better world. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. Around the world, the health care debate often revolves around access. Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, head of the World Health Organization, recently announced: "All roads lead to universal health coverage." Discussions for how to translate this vision into a road map for action is central to the agenda of the WHO's executive board meeting this week in Geneva. Yet focusing on access is not enough. The imperative for access must be paired with a frank acknowledgment that climate change is making communities around the world more vulnerable to ill health. A 2017 commission of The Lancet , a leading health research journal, tracked the effects of climate change on health and found evidence of harms "far worse that previously understood." Even as we move to close the access gap, a string of natural disasters in late 2017, including ...
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The Big Picture of Great Lakes Mercury Pollution 25.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Mercury is a widespread environmental toxicant and pollutant that travels up the food chain onto people's dinner plates. Although a global issue, mercury regulations vary worldwide. Depending on where one lives in relation to mercury emissions, regional remediation makes minimal impacts for local fish consumption advisories. This is particularly true in a sensitive landscape like Michigan's Upper Peninsula, where nearly 80 percent of inland lakes are impaired.
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In Montana, houses are replacing farmland 15.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Can lessons from Vermont keep local agriculture alive?
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9 Zero Waste experts to follow on Instagram 12.1.2018 TreeHugger
Stay on track with your zero waste efforts by joining an inspiring community doing the same thing.
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Coming soon: the Robomart, a self driving vegetable bin 11.1.2018 TreeHugger
Silicon Valley keeps thinking up fresh new ways to clog our roads, kill jobs and destroy main streets
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Digging In: Land Rights, Food Sovereignty and a Pop-Up Restaurant in Detroit 9.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Meiko Krishok, a young entrepreneur running a popular eatery in Detroit is navigating the challenges of doing business and serving healthy food in a city experiencing population decline, land misappropriation and infrastructure failure. Luckily, Krishok's business ethics and enduring patience offer a glimmer of hope to young, local up-and-comers. So does her food. Grassroots, not-for-profit news is rare -- and Truthout's very existence depends on donations from readers. Will you help us publish more stories like this one? Make a one-time or monthly donation by clicking here. The specter of decades of population decline -- empty fields where neighborhoods used to thrive persist – is an internationally recognizable symbol of Detroit, Michigan. Emptiness also serves as a key talking point, central to positioning the city as a clean slate -- sheer potential for entrepreneurs and investors from elsewhere, available to any of the highest bidders. But empty fields are not always what they appear. In fact, in ...
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One in Ten Amazon Workers In Ohio Uses Food Stamps To Survive 8.1.2018 CorpWatch Features
One in ten Amazon employees in Ohio needs government assistance to make ends meet, according to analysis conducted by Policy Matters Ohio, a Cleveland-based research group. This is despite the fact that, since 2014, the state has given Amazon over $125 million in subsidies to expand.
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Would you buy locally grown spices? 3.1.2018 TreeHugger
Coriander, mustard, ginger, galangal, paprika, and saffron could all be grown successfully on U.S. soil, if the incentive were there.
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A Radical Vision for Food: Everyone Growing It for Each Other 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
"If 100% of the people were farming, it would be ideal." -- Masanobu Fukuoka I grow a half-dozen fruit trees along my 40-foot stretch of sidewalk. The generous fig tree just finished, two young apple trees and a pomegranate are full of bounty, and the kumquat and persimmon are ripening. As much as I love the simple act of orcharding, I'm also sharing a radical vision for food and economy in my suburban Los Angeles community of Altadena. What if all my neighbors grew food in their yards, too? What if we shared the bounty with each other? What if you could eat a delicious, varied, and healthy meal from the abundance provided by your neighborhood trees? Forty percent of the food produced in the part of the planet we call the U.S. is wasted. Much of this waste ends up in landfills, where it produces methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The food–climate nexus is a window into a deeply broken system; studying it­ -- and experimenting with alternative economics within our communities -- can reveal solutions that ...
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A year of progressive, purposeful eating in 2018 20.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health The New Year is just a few weeks away -- a good time to start reflecting on what we should do that might be different. At least that is what I like to do at this time of year. Besides wishing everyone health and happiness (I always dodge the prosperity stuff 'cause I tend to feel that term is ambiguous at best), I always end up reflecting on how best to make this life count in the New Year. What things do I need to consider or undertake that might make this world, my community and myself better? For some, this time of year might lead to reflections around health, finances or acquisitions -- that never quite cuts it for me. My resolution this year is going to be all about how I can work towards sustainable eating practices -- practices that work to help the environment as well as food producers here and elsewhere…and practices that help to support food sovereignty. 1. Dump the transnationals This, I must admit, can be a lofty goal -- but it is one worth aspiring to. On the consumer end of ...
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How to Decolonize the Way You Think About Your Body 18.12.2017 Truthout.com
When it comes to eating disorder awareness, communities of color are too often left out of the conversation. Eating disorder research has historically left out women of color, and treatment plans are often expensive and lacking in cultural sensitivity. Less than 13 percent of adolescents receive treatment for their eating disorders, leaving thousands of others to suffer alone, in silence. But not if Gloria Lucas can help it. When you hear the phrase "eating disorder," what do you picture? Perhaps a young white woman, about 5'10", blonde, with a face you would expect to see in a Hollister advertisement, size 00 (yes, Hollister carries size double zero). Contrary to cultural assumptions, eating disorders do not just plague white cis hetero women. They affect everyone, regardless of race, size, gender, class, or sexuality. However, they don't affect everyone the same way. Eating disorder research has historically  left out women of color , and treatment plans are often expensive and lacking in cultural ...
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Food stamp benefits disrupted for thousands as state launches new eligibility system 16.12.2017 Chicago Tribune: Business
Tens of thousands of Illinois households aren’t receiving federal food stamp benefits leading up to the holidays because of problems with a state computer system. In 2013, the state’s Department of Human Services began rolling out a new computer system to administer entitlement benefits, such ...
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After the fire, charcoal goes against the grain, with the flow 12.12.2017 Environmental News Network
When a forest fire decimated more than 3,000 acres of Rice University-owned timberland in 2011, biogeochemist Carrie Masiello saw a silver lining in the blackened trees.
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Farmworkers Say "Us Too," Demanding Freedom From Sexual Violence 26.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
At Truthout, we never shy away from holding corporate and political forces to account -- but this kind of journalism is only made possible by readers like you. If you like what you're reading, make a donation! Ahead of the Thanksgiving feast, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) hit midtown Manhattan on Monday to face down the suits with chants of "Exploitation has got to go!" CIW was there to demand humane working conditions on their farms. Peppered with brass-band musicians and street puppets, the protesters rallied at the New York, N.Y. offices of the fast food giant Wendy's. CIW members hoisted tomato and bucket-shaped picket signs with slogans like "freedom from sexual violence" and "Justicia" to face off against Wendy's cheery, red pigtails. They demanded fair wages and freedom from violence and exploitation. This week's march, part of the coalition's multi-city tour to promote its Fair Food labor protection program , put women workers at the frontlines, protesting the epidemic of sexual ...
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A growing number of young Americans are leaving desk jobs to farm 24.11.2017 Chicago Tribune: Business
Liz Whitehurst dabbled in several careers before she ended up here, crating fistfuls of fresh-cut arugula in the early-November chill. The hours were better at her nonprofit jobs. So were the benefits. But two years ago, the 32-year-old Whitehurst - who graduated from a liberal arts college ...
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A Vision for the Navajo Nation in One Farm's Sustainability 23.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
This story is part of the  State of Change project , produced in partnership with the Solutions Journalism Network. This story originally appeared on High Country News . When the oil and gas industry takes a dive, or when extractive industries tank, so do economies in rural areas, where a lot of jobs come from drilling, mining and power plants. A business incubator is helping entrepreneurs on the Navajo Nation with the idea that local skills and talents -- and cash flowing in and out of local businesses -- are key to independence from environmentally damaging corporations.  There are about a thousand or so residents in Leupp on the Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona. They drive about an hour to get to a supermarket with fresh fruits and vegetables. Farmer Stacey Jensen is trying to change that by growing and trading food. "Like for example, I'll get apricots and peaches from Monavie, Tuba City area, get some beans from Hopi, from the mesas, then down here, Apache, I know they have some really good corn," ...
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Poverty Is Largely Invisible Among College Students 14.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Your support is crucial to keeping ethical journalism alive! Donate now to keep our writers on the streets, covering the most important issues and beats. This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. The first time I met an undergraduate who hadn't eaten in two days, I was stunned. The first time I spent the afternoon with a homeless college junior, I cried for most of the night. Now, after a decade of research on food and housing insecurity among college students, I'm just numb. I teach at an urban public university -- a "Research 1," top-of-the-Carnegie-rankings institution. I'm not one of Philadelphia's school teachers; I'm a professor with just one class to teach each term and a big research budget. But those trappings of prestige no longer shield me from the realities of poverty in our city, and more importantly, they don't help my students. Since 2008, my team's  research  on how students finance college has revealed that the main barrier to degree completion isn't tuition; it's having a place to ...
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