User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Systems :: Local Food Systems
Last updated: Nov 14 2017 20:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Poverty Is Largely Invisible Among College Students 14.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Your support is crucial to keeping ethical journalism alive! Donate now to keep our writers on the streets, covering the most important issues and beats. This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. The first time I met an undergraduate who hadn't eaten in two days, I was stunned. The first time I spent the afternoon with a homeless college junior, I cried for most of the night. Now, after a decade of research on food and housing insecurity among college students, I'm just numb. I teach at an urban public university -- a "Research 1," top-of-the-Carnegie-rankings institution. I'm not one of Philadelphia's school teachers; I'm a professor with just one class to teach each term and a big research budget. But those trappings of prestige no longer shield me from the realities of poverty in our city, and more importantly, they don't help my students. Since 2008, my team's  research  on how students finance college has revealed that the main barrier to degree completion isn't tuition; it's having a place to ...
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Organic food won't reduce your carbon footprint, study says 7.11.2017 TreeHugger
It's a disappointing conclusion, but surely there are other reasons why Earth-friendly food production is a good idea.
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A vision for the Navajo Nation in one farm’s sustainability 1.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Local businesses keep jobs and money circulating within their communities.
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How an ancient potato helped people survive climate shifts 30.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Utah-area tribes explain the continuing relevance of North America’s oldest spud.
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World Hunger Is Increasing Thanks to Wars and Climate Change 22.10.2017 Truthout.com
Truthout is a nonprofit media organization that survives on a no-frills budget, provided almost entirely by donations from readers like you. Want to make a difference? Make a donation today! Around the globe, about 815 million people -- 11 percent of the world's population -- went hungry in 2016, according to the latest data from the United Nations. This was the first increase in more than 15 years. Between 1990 and 2015, due largely to a set of sweeping initiatives by the global community, the proportion of undernourished people in the world was cut in half. In 2015, UN member countries adopted the Sustainable Development Goals , which doubled down on this success by setting out to end hunger entirely by 2030. But a recent UN report shows that, after years of decline, hunger is on the rise again. As evidenced by nonstop news coverage of floods, fires, refugees and violence, our planet has become a more unstable and less predictable place over the past few years. As these disasters compete for our ...
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Food insecurity and quality a big concern for Atlantic region's First Nations 19.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Newly published results from a study on food security and quality in First Nations communities in the Atlantic provinces show that food insecurity is rampant and that many households would like more access to traditional foods. The study found that 31% of First Nations households in the Atlantic provinces are severely or moderately food insecure, compared to the national average of 8%.The First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study (FNFNES), led by the University of Ottawa in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations and the University of Montreal, is the first national study of its kind. The recently published report for the Atlantic provinces details the dietary patterns, lifestyle and general health status of over 1,000 adults in 11 randomly selected First Nations communities.
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Imagining a regenerative economy in California's Central Valley 17.10.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Hubs of innovation can bring about a new era of agriculture and diversify beyond ag tech.
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In rural New Mexico, a new brewery creates momentum 16.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Truth or Consequences looks for ways to attract a new generation of entrepreneurs.
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The Hopeful Work of Turning Appalachia's Mountaintop Coal Mines Into Farms 16.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Ready to challenge injustice and spark real change? So are we. Support Truthout's mission today by making a tax-deductible donation. On a surface-mine-turned-farm in Mingo County, West Virginia, former coal miner Wilburn Jude plunks down three objects on the bed of his work truck: a piece of coal, a sponge, and a peach. He's been tasked with bringing in items that represent his life's past, present, and future. "This is my heritage right here," he says, picking up the coal. Since the time of his Irish immigrant great-grandfathers, all the males in his family have been miners. "Right now I'm a sponge," he says, pointing to the next object, "learning up here on this job, in school, everywhere, and doing the best I can to change everything around me." Then he holds up the peach. "And then my future. I'm going to be a piece of fruit. I'm going to be able to put out good things to help other people." Jude works for Refresh Appalachia, a social enterprise that partners with Reclaim Appalachia to convert ...
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Dispatch From the Front Lines of Puerto Rico in a Post-Maria World 11.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
This piece was originally published by Latino Rebels on October 9, 2017. You can access the original story here. One Day in the Life of a (Hurricane María) Survivor Salinas, Puerto Rico—My husband Roland wakes me up to the tune of "no water today." I suspected as much when I noticed the low water pressure during my nighttime visit to the bathroom. I guess the electric generator that was powering the water pump ran out of diesel or gas or maybe it malfunctioned. It's been on for the past two weeks and presumably they're supposed to be used only for emergencies. Yesterday, Dr. Gerson Jiménez, the medical director at Guayama's hospital (the only hospital still operating in the municipality of 45,000 people and serves as a regional medical facility), said he's afraid his generators will malfunction any day now because they're only meant to operate for 72 hours at a time. I thought things were bad without electricity. Now without water, it seems like life will be unbearable. The weekend weather brings more ...
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It Is Time to Transform, Not Just Rebuild, in Puerto Rico 4.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A car drives under tilted power line poles in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico on October 2, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo / AFP / Getty Images) As Puerto Rico faces the difficult task of rebuilding in the midst of an economic crisis, austerity measures are not the correct response. Instead, federal and local governments must aid recovery by investing in the island's existing physical and human resources, especially the community efforts to build a just and sustainable infrastructure in the wake of the financial crisis that preceded the hurricanes. A car drives under tilted power line poles in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico on October 2, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo / AFP / Getty Images) Do you want to see more stories like this one? Help us publish more like it: Make a donation to Truthout today! In a series of  tweets  on September 30, 2017, President Donald Trump countered challenges to his administration's response to the unfolding humanitarian ...
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AIM to Grow Conference held on the Agricultural Campus 3.10.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
The Dalhousie University Faculty of Agriculture, the Government of the Netherlands and a group of Dutch agri-food companies, Greenhouse industries and organizations, are teaming up to explore the possibilities of supporting more local food production and related R&D using innovative Controlled Environment Agriculture in Atlantic Canada.Controlled-environment agriculture (CEA) is a technology-based approach toward food production. The aim is to provide protection and maintain optimal growing conditions throughout the development of the crop. Production takes place within an enclosed growing structure such as a greenhouse or building.
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Vulture Capitalists Circle Above Puerto Rico 3.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Two hurricanes devastated Puerto Rico, plunging the island into darkness and despair. Over 3 million people are desperate for basic necessities like food, water, electricity and shelter. Yarimar Bonilla, a noted social anthropologist, says the hurricanes have made an already bad fiscal and economic crisis worse. The suffering that people are experiencing could prove to be of economic benefit to a small group of vulture capitalists.  Banana trees are seen knocked over by the winds of Hurricane Maria on October 2, 2017, in Corozal, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle / Getty Images) In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here. Puerto Rico is devastated. Two hurricanes plunged the island into darkness and despair. Crops perish in the fields. The landscape of ruined buildings and towns resemble Hiroshima after the atomic bomb was dropped on it. Over 3 million people are desperate for ...
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Vulture Capitalists Circle Above Puerto Rico Prey 3.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Two hurricanes devastated Puerto Rico, plunging the island into darkness and despair. Over 3 million people are desperate for basic necessities like food, water, electricity and shelter. Yarimar Bonilla, a noted social anthropologist, says the hurricanes have made an already bad fiscal and economic crisis worse. The suffering that people are experiencing could prove to be of economic benefit to a small group of vulture capitalists.  Banana trees are seen knocked over by the winds of Hurricane Maria on October 2, 2017, in Corozal, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle / Getty Images)   In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here. Puerto Rico is devastated. Two hurricanes plunged the island into darkness and despair. Crops perish in the fields. The landscape of ruined buildings and towns resemble Hiroshima after the atomic bomb was dropped on it. Over 3 million people are desperate ...
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This Newfoundlander wants kale, not cod 29.9.2017 TreeHugger
Jackson McLean is the face of a new vegan food movement on this remote Canadian island that's long been defined by fishing.
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Tucson’s seed library fosters food sovereignty in a desert 22.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
With help from Pima County’s public libraries, Tucsonans grow urban gardens.
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For farmers and working people, cancelling NAFTA could be the best way forward 20.9.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada Have you ever wondered what would happen if you called the bully's bluff? As Liberal members of Parliament return to their seats in the House of Commons, they need to consider the sometimes-veiled opportunities that political bullying provides. Are you listening, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland? More than 20 years ago, I was someone who campaigned and organized against the passage of both the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). I was devastated, like many others, when both passed, first the FTA and then later NAFTA, enabled by the Liberals, and supported over the years by various shades of Conservatives. The results of almost 30 years of free trade have not borne fruit for workers, the environment or family farmers. Over the years the U.S. has placed one barrier in front of another, and Canada has spent incredible energy trying to defend some of the public systems that have created a bit of equality in this country. Whether it be ...
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For farmers and working people, cancelling NAFTA might be the best way forward 20.9.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada Have you ever wondered what would happen if you called the bully's bluff? As Liberal members of Parliament return to their seats in the House of Commons, they need to consider the sometimes-veiled opportunities that political bullying provides. Are you listening, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland? More than 20 years ago, I was someone who campaigned and organized against the passage of both the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). I was devastated, like many others, when both passed, first the FTA and then later NAFTA, enabled by the Liberals, and supported over the years by various shades of Conservatives. The results of almost 30 years of free trade have not borne fruit for workers, the environment or family farmers. Over the years the U.S. has placed one barrier in front of another, and Canada has spent incredible energy trying to defend some of the public systems that have created a bit of equality in this country. Whether it be ...
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Western Towns Try To Stop Hungry Bears From Causing Havoc 18.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Sophie Quinton   BOULDER, Colo. — On a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking
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As oceans acidify, shellfish farmers respond 18.9.2017 Current Issue
Scientists collaborate to mitigate climate impacts in the Northwest.
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