User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Systems :: Local Food Systems
Last updated: Jun 16 2018 24:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Social enterprise improves food security in Garden Hill First Nation 15.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Marina Puzyreva Food insecurity is a pressing problem for thousands of Indigenous people living in remote reserves in the North of Manitoba. The new CCPA Manitoba report Harnessing the Potential of Social Enterprise in Garden Hill First Nation explores in-depth the themes around food insecurity: people's incomes and spending on food, health issues related to food consumption and traditional food culture. It also suggests ways to increase food accessibility and affordability through local efforts and appropriate public policies. Although the study is community specific, it echoes many problems faced by other northern communities. Garden Hill First Nation (GHFN) is a remote community located 610 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Similar to many northern communities, in GHFN the history of colonialism, assimilation and the legacy of residential schools have shaped the egregious conditions of poverty that many on-reserve residents struggle with every day: notably high rates of unemployment, a ...
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Tackling food insecurity in a northern Indigenous community 15.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tackling food insecurity in a northern Indigenous community
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Where are they now? A status report on previous 30 Under 30s 4.6.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Now in its third year, our roundup of 30 inspiring young sustainability leaders wouldn't be complete without a look at what their earlier cohorts are doing today.
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17 organizations feeding the world through regenerative agriculture 21.5.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Re-building resilience, one community at a time.
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Resisting the terror of cultural genocide at Muskrat Falls 26.4.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada On Monday, May 7, a rally and nonviolent direct action will take place on Parliament Hill in solidarity with the Labrador Land Protectors, a group of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are trying to stop an act of cultural genocide downstream of the massive Muskrat Falls mega-dam that experts predict will eventually cost $78 billion . Individuals trained in nonviolence will attempt to walk straight into the House of Commons and place on the desks of all 343 MPs pictures and testimonies from those at risk of methylmercury poisoning as well as mass drowning from a potential catastrophic dam break in Labrador. The gathering is in response to a call from the Labrador Land Protectors, who write: "This battle for our very lives can no longer be waged alone. Most of us in Labrador cannot go to Ottawa. We need your voices to help expose the major tragedy unfolding that there is still time to stop. Ensure the federal government sees our faces, hears our voices, and acts on our ...
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Homelessness and agriculture: Finding collective solutions to diverse issues 25.4.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health Perhaps it is because I am not that accustomed to walking through the inner city of Toronto or any city for that matter, or perhaps it is because I walked that inner city on some particularly cold and grey days recently… but it was an eyeopener walking from Union Station to Queen's Quay in Toronto. It is a short few blocks of walking on a cold grey day that bothers me still. That trip down Bay Street into the underpass of the Gardiner Expressway reminded me of just how many vulnerable people there are in our large and not-so-large cities. And many of them seem to be almost permanently homeless. That day as I walked under the Gardiner, I did not so much see homeless people as I did the items on the street that indicated that a stretch of sidewalk was inhabited and reserved. There were cartons of cardboard, items of clothing, and even a couch. I guess it is the couch that I walked past, pushed against a cold, grey concrete wall as if it was someone's living room, that really brought home that ...
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Can urban farming help solve the growing food scarcity crisis 20.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Former basketball player Will Allen talks about his mission to transform local food systems.
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What does sustainability mean for beef? 16.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored: Sara Place of The National Cattlemen's Beef Association discusses the challenges and solutions surrounding sustainable beef production
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Is the future of farming vertical? 6.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Companies including AeroFarms aim to narrow the farm-to-table gap.
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The shared city movement is paving the way to a better future 5.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Tom Llewellyn, coordinator of the Sharing Cities Network, discusses how local solutions can tackle global problems.
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How Food Stamps Are Keeping Small Farms in Business 2.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. On a weekend morning, the farmers market stretches out like a long caterpillar. Customers mill about, pushing strollers and walking dogs. A band is playing something folksy. Vendors stand behind tables that are literally spilling over with winter greens and root vegetables. It's a picture-perfect image that connotes abundance and community -- if you have the cash for it. The local food movement has been criticized for catering to middle- and upper-class Americans, and for leaving behind the low-income in all of the hype for Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and "know your farmer" initiatives touted in glossy food magazines. But in the last decade, food justice activists have sought to correct this, connecting low-income consumers with cooking classes, gardening workshops, children's programming, and locally grown and culturally appropriate foods. Enter Double Up Food Bucks, a program that doubles Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly ...
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Black Student Protesters in Chicago Are Denied Access to Public Restrooms at City Hall 30.3.2018 Truthout.com
On Wednesday, dozens of predominantly Black school students at Chicago's City Hall were offered a painful reminder of the systemic injustices that previous generations of Black activists had fought against. While participating in actions to protest against the proposed $95 million police training facility, they were denied access to food and public restrooms. Chicago student organizers stage a die-in at Chicago's City Hall on Wednesday to protest a proposed police academy facility. Students created cardboard headstones in memory of people killed by police as well as community hubs, such as schools and clinics, that have been shuttered under Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (Photo: Sarah-Ji) It's spring break for Chicago's public school students, and some of the city's young people are taking the opportunity to protest. This week, dozens of high school and middle school students from the city's South and West Sides have participated in a series of actions to demand that Chicago's City Council halt the proposed ...
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Rail lines, family farms and climate change: It's back to the future 22.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health Aficionados of western Canadian history know the historical role that the national railroad meant to the development of this country. While for the past three decades thousands of kilometres of rail lines across the country have been abandoned, the time is here to examine this type of underdevelopment. While many knew the price of curtailing train travel was high, the folly of it all is becoming increasingly clear given climate change. Pioneers in Western Canada would tell stories of riding the train as far as the line would go and then walking the rest of the journey to where they would homestead. I remember stories of my great-uncle taking the train to Moose Jaw from Quebec in 1904, and then walking to a piece of land near what would eventually become my hometown. Once at his concession, he sent word for the rest of the family to make the same journey. Eventually, in 1913 the train arrived in the new town and it made transport of goods and people much easier. Without the promise of a ...
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We Are All Fast Food Workers Now 21.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! "Many people are angered by the cruelties of the twenty-first-century economy. And their fury has fueled worldwide protest. Simultaneously, and almost everywhere, low-wage workers and small farmers began to revolt: in New York City restaurants, laundries, and warehouses, in Western Cape wineries and the garment shops of Phnom Penh, in Southern California Walmarts, and the big hotels of Providence, Oslo, Karachi, and Abuja. As capital has globalized, so has the labor movement. Marches, strikes, protests, and sit-ins from Tampa to Mali have changed the global conversation about workers' rights." So writes Annelise Orleck in her new book We Are All Fast Food Workers Now: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages -- which, as she explains on this week's episode of Off-Kilter, tells the story behind the growing global labor movement ...
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How Allagash brews sustainable practices into its operations 16.3.2018 GreenBiz.com
From reusing carbon dioxide to the way it handles spent grain, there are many ways the craft beer maker is closing the loop.
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Indigenous and Rural Women Conserve Mother Earth and Empower Their Communities 7.3.2018 Truthout.com
Women's rights and gender equality are crucial for not just women, but also for their communities and the environment. Increasing women's leadership in natural resource management, for example, is not only beneficial for biodiversity but also increases livelihood opportunities for women, thus improving their ability to plan for their families and resulting in positive outcomes for their communities. On this International Women's Day, we bring you a photo essay about Indigenous and rural women and their innate connection to nature. Women's rights and gender equality are crucial for not just women, but also for their communities and the environment. Women play a key role in the conservation of biodiversity and forests. A growing body of evidence shows that increasing women's leadership in natural resource management and governance is not only beneficial for biodiversity but also empowers women, increases their livelihood opportunities, improves their ability to plan for their families and results in ...
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Ants inspired Farm Fare to match small farmers with food buyers 22.2.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Looking for a way to help a sustainable food system grow, Cullen Naumoff turned to nature.
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A tale of two housing crises, rural and urban 5.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
How one Indigenous family is navigating two very different housing problems.
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What White People Can Do for Food Justice 29.1.2018 Truthout.com
People of color have been working for food justice for decades. They need resources. Chef Nadine Nelson, creator of Master Cooks Corps train-the-trainer program, says white people in the food movement should ask: What are you doing to hold yourself accountable to people of color? Best-selling author Mark Bittman prepares lunch in Washington, DC, on Saturday, May 4, 2013. (Photo: Nikki Kahn / The Washington Post via Getty Images)   Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! It is possible that the rich and famous can offer more to society than glimpses into their opulent lifestyles. The cult of celebrity today goes beyond our desire and admiration of superstars' expensive clothes, cars, and houses. We want to know where they stand on important issues that impact our lives, like racism, sexual violence, the environment, food and land reform. To our consolation, some of them are actually using their platforms to stand ...
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Here are 5 ways climate became part of the 2018 Davos dialogue 29.1.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Despite the U.S. government's silence, plenty of world leaders and corporate chieftains are speaking up.
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