User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Security :: Food Sovereignty
Last updated: Nov 22 2018 15:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In a small Alaskan town, entrepreneurs attempt to go from food insecure to secure 28.9.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Where food prices are 35 percent higher than the US mainland average, community members do what they can to address food insecurity.
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A sharing economy for plants: Seed libraries are sprouting up 22.11.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Agribusinesses vs. community agriculture — an American tradition?
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In deep water: Water economy is threatened by climate change 7.7.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
With water quickly becoming a scarce resource, market innovations are changing the way we use it.
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Two important stories about seed and Monsanto 20.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health For decades, pockets of resistance around the world have been tracking and educating general publics about farmers' right to seed and the importance of not allowing corporations to patent seed or to manipulate genetic material for pure speculation and gain. Behind most of these stories of resistance has been the far-reaching control exercised by corporate giant Monsanto, particularly when it comes to demanding royalties on seed (harken back to Percy Schmeiser ) and modifying seed to be resistant to glysophate, a chemical pesticide it produces and sells under the brand of Roundup. Yes, we have all heard it said: Roundup Ready! Catchy and scary at the same time. This week two stories once again are showing how carelessness in food production and a lax regulatory framework, as well as popular pressure and resistance on food issues, can have dramatic results. These stories run deep. Canadian Biotechnology Action Network (CBAN) has been monitoring the regulatory climate around genetically ...
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Cheesy idea 2.12.2017 BBC: Business
Food businesses serving up cheesy dishes are thriving, but is the trend bad for our health?
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How small businesses are dealing with online giants 2.12.2017 BBC: Business
Many UK independent shops are coming out fighting when it comes to the big online players.
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Supermarkets 'raise the price of Christmas biscuits' 1.12.2017 BBC: Business
Supermarkets hike the price of Christmas biscuit selections as butter prices soar, according to a report.
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Radical revolution 27.11.2017 BBC: Business
This simple yet transformative piece of technology made civilisation possible.
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Need for speed 27.11.2017 BBC: Business
The founder of the sports nutrition company MaxiMuscle wants to buy back the firm he founded.
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Nothing wasted 25.11.2017 BBC: Business
A growing number of businesses are finding creative uses for surplus food - but will the trend ever go mainstream?
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Have Monsanto and the Biotech Industry Turned Natural Bt Pesticides Into GMO "Super Toxins"? 11.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here. Is the supposed safety advantage of GMO crops over conventional chemical pesticides a mirage? According to biotech lore, the Bt pesticides introduced into many GMO food crops are natural proteins whose toxic activity extends  only to narrow groups of insect species . Therefore, says the industry, these pesticides can all be safely eaten, e.g. by humans. This is not the interpretation we arrived at after our analysis of the documents accompanying the commercial approval of 23 typical Bt-containing GMO crops, however (see  Latham et al., 2017 , just published in the journal Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Reviews). In our publication, authored along with Madeleine Love and Angelika Hilbeck, of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), we show that commercial GMO Bt toxins differ greatly from their natural precursors. ...
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How an urban school's gardening project healed a community 29.7.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Teacher Stephen Ritz transformed a school's lunch program by getting kids involved in community gardening — as well as nurturing their hearts and minds.
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As Climate Change Threatens Food Supplies, Seed Saving Is an Ancient Act of Resilience 25.6.2017 Truthout.com
On Feb. 26, 2008, a $9-million underground seed vault began operating deep in the permafrost on the Norwegian island of  Spitsbergen , just 810 miles from the North Pole. This high-tech Noah's Ark for the world's food varieties was intended to assure that, even in a worst-case scenario, our irreplaceable heritage of food seeds would remain safely frozen. Less than 10 years after it opened, the facility flooded. The seeds are safe; the water only entered a passageway. Still, as vast areas of permafrost melt, the breach raises serious questions about the security of the seeds, and whether a centralized seed bank is really the best way to safeguard the world's food supply.  Meanwhile, a much older approach to saving the world's heritage of food varieties is making a comeback. On a recent Saturday afternoon, a group of volunteers in the northern Montana city of Great Falls met in the local library to package seeds for their newly formed seed exchange, and to share their passion for gardening and food ...
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As Climate Change Threatens Food Supplies, Seed Saving Is An Ancient Act Of Resilience 23.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In Norway, a high-tech seed vault flooded from melting permafrost. In Montana, locals keep their seeds in the library. On Feb. 26, 2008, a $9-million underground seed vault began operating deep in the permafrost on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen , just 810 miles from the North Pole. This high-tech Noah’s Ark for the world’s food varieties was intended to assure that, even in a worst-case scenario, our irreplaceable heritage of food seeds would remain safely frozen. Less than 10 years after it opened, the facility flooded. The seeds are safe; the water only entered a passageway. Still, as vast areas of permafrost melt, the breach raises serious questions about the security of the seeds, and whether a centralized seed bank is really the best way to safeguard the world’s food supply. Meanwhile, a much older approach to saving the world’s heritage of food varieties is making a comeback. On a recent Saturday afternoon, a group of volunteers in the northern Montana city of Great Falls met in the local ...
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New peer-to-peer seed sharing platform aims to facilitate a diverse seed supply 3.5.2017 TreeHugger
The Center for Food Safety's recently launched network is a bid to preserve global plant biodiversity and work toward food security around the globe.
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Behind a Corporate Monster: How Monsanto Pushes Agricultural Domination 19.3.2017 Truthout.com
A farmhand loads genetically modified corn seed into a planter on Bo Stone's farm in Rowland, North Carolina, April 20, 2016. (Photo: Jeremy M. Lange / The New York Times) Monsanto, one of the world's biggest pesticide and seed corporations and leading developer of genetically modified crop varieties, had a stock market value of US$66 billion in 2014. It has gained this position by a combination of deceit, threat, litigation, destruction of evidence, falsified data, bribery, takeovers and cultivation of regulatory bodies. Its rise and torrid controversies cover a long period starting with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, chemicals used as insulators for electrical transformers) in the 1940s and moving on to dioxin (a contaminant of Agent Orange used to defoliate Vietnam), glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide), recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH, a hormone injected into dairy cows to increase their milk production), and genetic modified organisms (GMOs). Its key aim in dealing with ...
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Turning food waste into tires 7.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Tomorrow’s tires could come from the farm as much as the factory.Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered that food waste can partially replace the petroleum-based filler that has been used in manufacturing tires for more than a century.In tests, rubber made with the new fillers exceeds industrial standards for performance, which may ultimately open up new applications for rubber.
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Are 'open source' seeds necessary for a resilient food system? 4.1.2017 GreenBiz.com
As the global agriculture industry consolidates with the recent merger between Monsanto and Bayer, the question is raised: What does it mean for the rest of us?
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Ending a Century of Ecocide and Genocide, Seeding Earth Democracy 12.10.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Vandana Shiva

For more than a century, a poison cartel has experimented with and developed chemicals to kill people, first in Hitler's concentration camps and the war, later by selling these chemicals as inputs for industrial agriculture.

In a little over half a century, small farmers have been uprooted everywhere, by design, further expanding the toxic fields of  the industrial agriculture.

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Meet the unsung conservation hero you're overlooking 27.8.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
A hidden conservation movement is underway, and it doesn't follow the "good guys versus bad guys" narrative of old Westerns.
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