User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Security :: Access
Last updated: Jul 07 2018 15:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How US colonialism affects Indigenous peoples’ stewardship and access to food 9.11.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
From ceremonies to harvesting and food storage, to political leadership, to gender relations, indigenous groups have detailed understandings of how design societal institutions to support resilience. But colonialism changed that.
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Circularity in cities is about equity, too 1.11.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Don’t forget the economy in the circular economy.
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Can better broadband and big data save rural America? 21.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Independent farms need better internet to survive, let alone to compete with the large agriculture industry.
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The history of cellular agriculture (and the future of food, too) 7.9.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Cowless meat, chickenless eggs and fishless seafood — oh my.
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Farmers are reaping the love of Campbell, Kellogg, Stonyfield and Molson Coors 26.8.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
How big data and incentives are helping companies forge closer partnerships across agricultural supply chains.
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Innovator BanQu builds blockchain and bridges for traceability, small farmers’ livelihoods 14.8.2019 GreenBiz.com
Companies such as Anheuser-Busch InBev and Mars have allied with the company to help customers better understand their product origins and sustainability.
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Shake it up: A Q&A with Sarah Pool, co-founder of upcycled spent grain protein shake company 21.6.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
How this entrepreneur is combining her love of nutrition and the environment.
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Improving food cold chains for farmers and citizens in India 14.6.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
New research shows that temperature-controlling supply chains can cut food waste and boost public health in the country.
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Who will save Africa’s rural farmers when investment and climate change roll in? 15.5.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
With the continent in transformation, there are three key areas to focus on for climate action.
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UN decade of family farming puts spotlight on food insecurity 24.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health The United Nations has declared the years 2019 to 2028 as the UN Decade of Family Farming, citing the need to stem hunger and work toward food security. The official launch of the decade will take place in May. The UN has identified a number of key issues, including public policies, that promote the development of family farms, the protection of biodiversity, forests necessary to supporting family farms, sustainable fisheries and agroecology. While 2014 was officially the year of family farming, the UN states that, by creating a decade dedicated to family farming , it aims to draw attention to the fact that the people who produce more than 80 per cent of the planet's food paradoxically are often the most vulnerable to hunger.  My hope is that the UN decade will expose and emphasize the real causes of hunger on this planet -- how the creation of hunger is directly linked to environmental degradation and land grabbing; the loss of family farms and farmland to speculation and concentration, an ...
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How urban agriculture could improve food security in U.S. cities 22.2.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Cuba offers interesting lessons for how to develop urban agriculture, including government-allocated land and agroecological methods that deliver high yields and diverse crops in small spaces.
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The perfect match: businesses and the SDGs 12.2.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
How sustainability and inclusivity are driving the business models of the future.
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Organic Green New Deal? Comprehensive climate change policy must address the American food system 8.2.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
The proposed bill must put just rural economic and environmental development back on the table.
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In deep water: Water economy is threatened by climate change 7.7.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
With water quickly becoming a scarce resource, market innovations are changing the way we use it.
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Social enterprise improves food security in Garden Hill First Nation 15.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Marina Puzyreva Food insecurity is a pressing problem for thousands of Indigenous people living in remote reserves in the North of Manitoba. The new CCPA Manitoba report Harnessing the Potential of Social Enterprise in Garden Hill First Nation explores in-depth the themes around food insecurity: people's incomes and spending on food, health issues related to food consumption and traditional food culture. It also suggests ways to increase food accessibility and affordability through local efforts and appropriate public policies. Although the study is community specific, it echoes many problems faced by other northern communities. Garden Hill First Nation (GHFN) is a remote community located 610 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Similar to many northern communities, in GHFN the history of colonialism, assimilation and the legacy of residential schools have shaped the egregious conditions of poverty that many on-reserve residents struggle with every day: notably high rates of unemployment, a ...
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The plight of farm workers in Canada 23.5.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Labour Farm work is hard work! The days are long, and the physical work can be heavy and exhausting. Often, particularly on smaller family farms, the monetary rewards are nowhere near what a regular urban salary provides. There are lots of reasons why the family farm has been disappearing over the past several decades. (Check out some of my previous columns for details about the issue of land concentration.) Suffice to say, that for many reasons, among them the loss of family farmers and the ever-increasing numbers of factory farms, Canadian agricultural production just wouldn't happen without farm workers. And while the majority of those farm workers are domestic, there are ever-increasing numbers of foreign migrant workers. Many come to work on labour intensive agricultural operations that produce fruit and vegetables in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia. In fact, 33 per cent of vegetable and fruit farm workers are foreign workers. Others come to work on cattle operations and in large ...
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The 2018 Farm Bill's Hidden Agenda to Push Millions Off Food Stamps 18.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout doesn't take corporate money and we don't shy away from confronting the root causes of injustice. Can you help sustain our work with a tax-deductible donation? Last August, on the first day of an eight state, two-installment RV tour to address poverty and prosperity in rural America for the upcoming farm bill, US Department of Agriculture Secretary George "Sonny" Perdue visited the Wisconsin State Fair.  Activities that morning included carnival rides and a listening session with farmers, which Perdue hosted alongside Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. Afterward, Perdue, Walker and their families were in search of food. Walker quipped, "We'll probably find a few things on a stick." Perdue then set out in a Class A Hurricane Thor Motor Coach (floorplans start with an MSRP value above $100,000) to meet with young farmers at a farm he called, "a feed the hunger" type farm -- in reference to the Hunger Task Force Farm south of Milwaukee. Perdue also hosted Paul Ryan in the RV later that day. They sat ...
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Waiting Tables or Harvesting Food, Why Fair Labor Is Still About Civil Rights 13.4.2018 Truthout.com
Just as the farmworkers used the intersections of race, class, and gender to engage an audience beyond their industry, we must expose the racial and gender biases as part of an effort to raise wages and working conditions for all workers in the food industry and economy-wide. (Photo: Klaus Vedfelt / Getty Images) It only takes a moment to contribute your support for courageous reporting and bold storytelling. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout today. Dolores Huerta organized some of the most vulnerable workers in this country and, standing alongside them, stood up to their powerful bosses -- and won. "When we started to organize farmworkers, people would say to us, 'They're poor, they don't speak English, they're not citizens. How are you going to possibly organize them?'" Huerta recalls in Dolores, a new documentary film about her life and work. "And, of course, the response that we had to that is, 'The power is in your body.'" The lesson of Dolores is that there is inherent power ...
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How Food Stamps Are Keeping Small Farms in Business 2.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. On a weekend morning, the farmers market stretches out like a long caterpillar. Customers mill about, pushing strollers and walking dogs. A band is playing something folksy. Vendors stand behind tables that are literally spilling over with winter greens and root vegetables. It's a picture-perfect image that connotes abundance and community -- if you have the cash for it. The local food movement has been criticized for catering to middle- and upper-class Americans, and for leaving behind the low-income in all of the hype for Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and "know your farmer" initiatives touted in glossy food magazines. But in the last decade, food justice activists have sought to correct this, connecting low-income consumers with cooking classes, gardening workshops, children's programming, and locally grown and culturally appropriate foods. Enter Double Up Food Bucks, a program that doubles Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly ...
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Black Student Protesters in Chicago Are Denied Access to Public Restrooms at City Hall 30.3.2018 Truthout.com
On Wednesday, dozens of predominantly Black school students at Chicago's City Hall were offered a painful reminder of the systemic injustices that previous generations of Black activists had fought against. While participating in actions to protest against the proposed $95 million police training facility, they were denied access to food and public restrooms. Chicago student organizers stage a die-in at Chicago's City Hall on Wednesday to protest a proposed police academy facility. Students created cardboard headstones in memory of people killed by police as well as community hubs, such as schools and clinics, that have been shuttered under Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (Photo: Sarah-Ji) It's spring break for Chicago's public school students, and some of the city's young people are taking the opportunity to protest. This week, dozens of high school and middle school students from the city's South and West Sides have participated in a series of actions to demand that Chicago's City Council halt the proposed ...
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