On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Security :: Hunger
Last updated: Nov 21 2018 18:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Solving Food Waste and Hunger 9.9.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Solving Food Waste and Hunger An estimated 1.3 billion metric tons of food is lost or wasted globally each year, according to the United Nations — about one-third of all the food produced for human consumption. Meanwhile, over 690 million people worldwide still went hungry in the last year. These two problems should seemingly solve themselves. Innovative circular economy models might be able to help.  Speakers Holly Secon Tue, 09/08/2020 - ...
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Hunting and fishing provide food security in the time of COVID-19 29.4.2020 High Country News Most Recent
But virus fears and travel restrictions could impact big game season in the fall.
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Childhood hunger in the US is a solvable problem 13.3.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
There’s no shortage of food in the country. Here's how one organization is connecting hungry kids to the abundance of food and existing programs previously inaccessible to them.
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How 16 initiatives are changing urban agriculture through tech and innovation 2.1.2020 GreenBiz.com
From high-tech indoor farms in France and Singapore to mobile apps connecting urban growers and eaters in India and the United States, here are more than a dozen initiatives using tech, entrepreneurship, and social innovation to change urban agriculture.
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Entrepreneurs and government are teaming up to boost food security in the United Arab Emirates — and beyond 3.12.2019 GreenBiz.com
From vertical farms to fish caves, new technologies aim to boost food production and vanquish hunger.
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A systems approach to global agriculture could solve food insecurity 14.8.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Challenges face the global agricultural value chain and food security — but a different way of looking at them could be the solution.
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Food security is a huge threat to Singapore — is urban farming the answer? 31.5.2019 GreenBiz.com
The island-state imports most of its food, but is threatened by crop yields and policy changes around the world.
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UN decade of family farming puts spotlight on food insecurity 24.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health The United Nations has declared the years 2019 to 2028 as the UN Decade of Family Farming, citing the need to stem hunger and work toward food security. The official launch of the decade will take place in May. The UN has identified a number of key issues, including public policies, that promote the development of family farms, the protection of biodiversity, forests necessary to supporting family farms, sustainable fisheries and agroecology. While 2014 was officially the year of family farming, the UN states that, by creating a decade dedicated to family farming , it aims to draw attention to the fact that the people who produce more than 80 per cent of the planet's food paradoxically are often the most vulnerable to hunger.  My hope is that the UN decade will expose and emphasize the real causes of hunger on this planet -- how the creation of hunger is directly linked to environmental degradation and land grabbing; the loss of family farms and farmland to speculation and concentration, an ...
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The overlooked role of food banks in slashing emissions 29.3.2019 GreenBiz.com
Food banks are helping to tackle hunger and prevent emissions equivalent to the annual carbon output of 2.2 million cars, a new report says.
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How urban agriculture could improve food security in U.S. cities 22.2.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Cuba offers interesting lessons for how to develop urban agriculture, including government-allocated land and agroecological methods that deliver high yields and diverse crops in small spaces.
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How DSM is embracing the Sustainable Development Goals 9.1.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The food supply giant is pursuing five of the SDGs to drive its sustainability efforts, including the mission to eradicate hunger.
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World hunger rose for three years running, and climate change is a cause 21.11.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Leer en español.
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16 apps helping companies and consumers prevent food waste 12.10.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
These technologies are fighting both hunger and climate change.
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Trade and food security are linked — and both are in danger 27.9.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Climate change is disrupting our agricultural production, and we'll need international agreements to solve the global challenge.
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Social enterprise improves food security in Garden Hill First Nation 15.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Marina Puzyreva Food insecurity is a pressing problem for thousands of Indigenous people living in remote reserves in the North of Manitoba. The new CCPA Manitoba report Harnessing the Potential of Social Enterprise in Garden Hill First Nation explores in-depth the themes around food insecurity: people's incomes and spending on food, health issues related to food consumption and traditional food culture. It also suggests ways to increase food accessibility and affordability through local efforts and appropriate public policies. Although the study is community specific, it echoes many problems faced by other northern communities. Garden Hill First Nation (GHFN) is a remote community located 610 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Similar to many northern communities, in GHFN the history of colonialism, assimilation and the legacy of residential schools have shaped the egregious conditions of poverty that many on-reserve residents struggle with every day: notably high rates of unemployment, a ...
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Twenty-Five Years After the Lucasville Uprising, Its Survivors Are Leading a New Prison Resistance Movement 26.4.2018 Truthout.com
This month marks the 25th anniversary of the Lucasville Uprising, the longest prison revolt involving fatalities to occur in the history of the United States. Survivors of this 11-day prison takeover are still fighting for basic human rights behind bars -- and still meeting state repression, now that prison strikes are regularly coordinated beyond any individual prison's walls. Police officers patrol the outer perimeter of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility April 12, 1993, after a prisoner uprising on April 11, 1993. (Photo: Eugene Garcia / AFP / Getty Images) This month marks the 25th anniversary of the Lucasville Uprising, the longest prison revolt involving fatalities to occur in the history of the United States. Survivors of this 11-day prisoner takeover of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility (SOCF) have been active and inspiring participants in the present movement for prisoners' rights, gaining attention that was unavailable to them in 1993. In light of the growing momentum in prisoner ...
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The 2018 Farm Bill's Hidden Agenda to Push Millions Off Food Stamps 18.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout doesn't take corporate money and we don't shy away from confronting the root causes of injustice. Can you help sustain our work with a tax-deductible donation? Last August, on the first day of an eight state, two-installment RV tour to address poverty and prosperity in rural America for the upcoming farm bill, US Department of Agriculture Secretary George "Sonny" Perdue visited the Wisconsin State Fair.  Activities that morning included carnival rides and a listening session with farmers, which Perdue hosted alongside Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. Afterward, Perdue, Walker and their families were in search of food. Walker quipped, "We'll probably find a few things on a stick." Perdue then set out in a Class A Hurricane Thor Motor Coach (floorplans start with an MSRP value above $100,000) to meet with young farmers at a farm he called, "a feed the hunger" type farm -- in reference to the Hunger Task Force Farm south of Milwaukee. Perdue also hosted Paul Ryan in the RV later that day. They sat ...
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How Food Stamps Are Keeping Small Farms in Business 2.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. On a weekend morning, the farmers market stretches out like a long caterpillar. Customers mill about, pushing strollers and walking dogs. A band is playing something folksy. Vendors stand behind tables that are literally spilling over with winter greens and root vegetables. It's a picture-perfect image that connotes abundance and community -- if you have the cash for it. The local food movement has been criticized for catering to middle- and upper-class Americans, and for leaving behind the low-income in all of the hype for Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and "know your farmer" initiatives touted in glossy food magazines. But in the last decade, food justice activists have sought to correct this, connecting low-income consumers with cooking classes, gardening workshops, children's programming, and locally grown and culturally appropriate foods. Enter Double Up Food Bucks, a program that doubles Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly ...
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"Giving Up Food So Our Children Can Eat": The Workers Using Hunger Strikes to Protest for a Living Wage 27.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. As spring came to Rhode Island in 2014, Dominican hotel housekeeper Santa Brito and fellow hotel workers Ylleny Ferraris, Mirjaam Parada, and Mariano Cruz were gathering signatures for a Providence $15 wage initiative. "We had to divide up," says state representative Shelby Maldonado. "We asked: Who speaks the best Spanish? The best Creole?" Maldonado, a child of Guatemalan immigrants and a former UNITE HERE organizer, says that Rhode Island's immigrant workforce viscerally understood the issues at stake. They delivered their petitions. The city council put their living-wage initiative on the November ballot. When they convened a public hearing, a hundred hotel workers came to watch. Twenty-two registered to testify. They took time off, found babysitters, and wrote their testimonies. Then, at the last minute, the hearing was canceled. Brito ...
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