User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Consumption :: Marketing
Last updated: Jun 26 2020 19:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Where Unilever's product labeling initiative could have a huge impact 26.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
Where Unilever's product labeling initiative could have a huge impact Jim Giles Fri, 06/26/2020 - 01:00 One of the most significant projects in sustainable food in 2020 was unveiled last week. The news is important partly because of the company involved: CPG behemoth Unilever, which reaches 2.5 billion consumers every day through 400 brands, which range from Ben & Jerry’s to Hellmann’s and appear on shelves in 190 countries.  The other reason is that the plan is genuinely ambitious . The company is committing to net-zero emissions from all products by 2039, spending $1 billion on climate and nature projects over 10 years, and planning on labeling each of its products with information about the carbon emitted in the product’s creation. This last point is particularly significant. Consumers, especially younger adults, consistently say that climate concerns influence their purchasing. Yet this influence is diluted because most people have little insight into the emissions linked to specific products. ...
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It's Time to Confront the Scourge of Advertising in the Capitalist Food System 7.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
While it's customary to blame consumer companies and their advertising campaigns for predatory and manipulative messages, it's time to look beyond that critique to the truly deadly ingredient in the mix: capitalism itself. After all, the proliferation of lifestyle diseases is a direct result of lifestyle advertising promoted and subsidized under our capitalist system. Mr. Peanut joins other Kraft Heinz mascots in Times Square for the kick-off event of the 'Feed Your Family, Feed The World' program, on April 27, 2017, in New York City. (Photo: Jason Kempin / Getty Images for Kraft Heinz) This story wasn't funded by corporate advertising, but by readers like you. Can you help sustain our work with a tax-deductible donation? In December, the Kraft Heinz Company launched a multimillion-dollar  advertising campaign  in response to " prolonged negative perceptions " about the health risk associated with its products. Between 2014 and 2016, Kraft Heinz's net income fell by an astounding  24 percent , due in no ...
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The Food Industry Has the Trump Administration Right Where It Wants It 16.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. When Donald Trump was elected president, American consumer protection groups, food safety advocates and commentators were "on high alert." Two months prior, his campaign had posted -- and later deleted -- an online fact sheet that highlighted a number of "regulations to be eliminated" under his proposed economic plan. The document read in part: The FDA Food Police, which [sic] dictate how the federal government expects farmers to produce fruits and vegetables and even dictates the nutritional content of dog food. The rules govern the soil farmers use, farm and food production hygiene, food packaging, food temperatures and even what animals may roam which fields and when. It also greatly increased inspections of food 'facilities,' and levies new taxes to pay for this inspection overkill.  Now, with Trump's first year in office characterized by tumult and scandal (including the FBI's ongoing ...
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Amazon's Whole Foods Price Cuts Brought 25% Jump in Shoppers 12.9.2017 Science / Technology News

Register to become a member today. You'll get the essential information you need to do your job better, including Amazon's splashy takeover of Whole Foods, complete with deep price cuts, did more than bring a surge of publicity to the chain: It boosted customer traffic by 25%.

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Journalism Is Dying and Content Marketing Is Taking Its Place (I Know Because I Do Both) 23.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
As more and more journalists are forced to make a living as content producers for corporations creating "news" articles, infographics and videos, it's becoming harder to separate the spin from the real, especially when well-respected sites like WebMD carry an undifferentiated mix of both content and news. Spin is spin, even when it is written by journalists. (Image: scyther5 / iStock / Getty Images Plus) Stories like this can't be found in corporate media! Make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout by clicking here. I first started writing articles when I was a teenager, as one of the ways I could contribute to the movement to stop the war on Iraq, to free the refugees from detention in Australia and to stop a waste dump being built where I lived (one of the poorest parts of Sydney). I've been a journalist for 16 years now, writing from Bolivia, Mexico, Venezuela, Pakistan and other countries -- aiming to center the voices of those who aren't usually heard, and covering the other side of the story. But ...
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Behind a Corporate Monster: How Monsanto Pushes Agricultural Domination 19.3.2017 Truthout.com
A farmhand loads genetically modified corn seed into a planter on Bo Stone's farm in Rowland, North Carolina, April 20, 2016. (Photo: Jeremy M. Lange / The New York Times) Monsanto, one of the world's biggest pesticide and seed corporations and leading developer of genetically modified crop varieties, had a stock market value of US$66 billion in 2014. It has gained this position by a combination of deceit, threat, litigation, destruction of evidence, falsified data, bribery, takeovers and cultivation of regulatory bodies. Its rise and torrid controversies cover a long period starting with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, chemicals used as insulators for electrical transformers) in the 1940s and moving on to dioxin (a contaminant of Agent Orange used to defoliate Vietnam), glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide), recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH, a hormone injected into dairy cows to increase their milk production), and genetic modified organisms (GMOs). Its key aim in dealing with ...
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Expiry dates are pointless when you know how to cook 9.3.2017 TreeHugger
Food waste expert Jonathan Bloom argues that Americans need to stop relying on best-before dates and start using their senses.
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Kids see far too many junk food ads on the Internet 7.3.2017 TreeHugger
Unlike TV, the online world has no limits when it comes to advertising junk food to children and teens. This needs to change.
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Kellogg Is Latest Company To Pull Advertising From Breitbart 30.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Kellogg is pulling advertisements from Breitbart, a website that traffics in  racist, sexist and anti-Semitic  content.  A Kellogg spokesman told The Huffington Post that consumers alerted the food company to its ads on Breitbart.  “We regularly work with our media buying partners to ensure our ads do not appear on sites that aren’t aligned with our values as company,” Kellogg spokesman Kris Charles said. “This involves reviewing websites where ads could potentially be placed using filtering technology to assess site content. As you can imagine, there is a very large volume of websites, so occasionally something is inadvertently missed.” Breitbart did not immediately return a request for comment. Its executive chairman,  Steve Bannon , has been named chief strategist and senior counselor to President-elect Donald Trump . Kellogg is only the latest company to sever relations with Breitbart, whose  incendiary headlines include “Birth Control Makes Women Unattractive And Crazy” and “Bill Kristol: Republican ...
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Trump Talk of Pompeo for Cabinet Could Spell Setback for Consumers 18.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
News that President-elect Donald Trump is considering U.S. Rep. Mike Pompeo for a cabinet slot illustrates just how dark the days ahead might be for America's burgeoning "food movement," which has been advocating for more transparency and fewer pesticides in food production. Pompeo, a Republican from the farm state of Kansas, was the designated hitter for Monsanto Co. and the other Big Ag chemical and seed players in 2014 when the industry rolled out a federal effort to block states from mandating the labeling of genetically modified foods. Pompeo introduced the "Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act" in April of that year with the intention of overriding bills in roughly two dozen states. In bringing the bill forward, Pompeo was acting on behalf the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), which represents the interests of the nation's largest food and beverage companies. The bill, which critics called the "Deny Americans the Right to Know" Act, or the "DARK Act," went through two years of controversy and ...
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Ruling Against Pro-GMO Lobby Highlights Dark Money's "Egregious" Role in State Ballot Fights 3.11.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Amid an election season where corporations are once again spending "vast unholy sums to defeat popular initiatives," a major food industry group has been found guilty of intentionally violating campaign finance laws by shielding its donors during Washington state's contentious 2013 GMO labeling fight.

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Addressing Food Waste Through Date Labeling 24.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Food waste has become a hot topic. Finding ways to waste less food and recycle unavoidable waste - such as plate scraps and peels - is on the minds of businesses, lawmakers, nonprofit organizations and consumers and there is no silver bullet solution. It will take big and small changes to yield results. We know that approximately 40 percent of the food grown in the U.S. is wasted. In fact, food waste is the single largest category of material going into our landfills. While it happens all along the supply chain, American consumers account for 44 percent of food waste sent to landfill, making households the largest source of food waste in the country. Part of that food waste, as demonstrated in studies by groups like the Harvard Law and Policy Clinic and the Institute of Food Scientists, is due to confusion over date labels, and industry is working to find a solution. One such solution is date labeling. The consumer packaged goods (CPG) and retail industries recognize consumers are confused about date ...
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Corporate Sponsorships of Olympics Make Political Investments Look Like a Very Good Deal 9.8.2016 Truthout.com
If you thought there was a lot of corporate money in politics, you haven't seen the amount of cash that goes into sponsoring the US Olympic games. Eleven multinational corporations each paid the International Olympic Committee an estimated $100 million for a four-year partnership that gives them  coveted advertising rights  during the global sporting competition. (International Olympics Committee reps won't say how much a top sponsorship deal costs, but on  p. 114 of the IOC's 2014 annual report, revenue for 2013-2016 is forecast to be $5.5 billion. Sponsorship deals account for 19 percent of that.) That kind of cash makes the millions these top-tier Olympic backers shell out to lobbyists and candidates seem like chump change -- and shows that global brand exposure during one of the most-watched sporting events in the world might be higher priority than influencing US policy and politicians. Still, one bad decision by Congress or the regulatory agencies can put a severe dent in a company's business, so ...
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Why the GMO 'Labeling' Bill That Obama Just Signed Into Law Is a Sham--and a National Embarrassment 6.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
It is known as the DARK Act. D-A-R-K standing for Denying Americans the Right to Know. It was signed by President Obama last Friday in the afterglow of the Democratic National Convention, without fanfare or major media coverage. The bill's moniker is apt. With a few strokes of his pen Obama scratched out the laws of Vermont, Connecticut and Maine that required the labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods. He also nullified the GE seed labeling laws in Vermont and Virginia which allowed farmers to choose what seeds they wanted to buy and plant. And for good measure he preempted Alaska's law requiring the labeling of any GE fish or fish product, a law passed to protect the state's vital fisheries from contamination by recently approved genetically engineered salmon. The White House justified the Dark Act's massive onslaught on local democracy on the grounds that the bill would create national standards for labeling of GE foods. It does nothing of the sort. In fact, according to Obama's own Food and ...
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Corporate sponsorships of Olympics make political investments look like a very good deal 6.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
by by Ashley Balcerzak The highest-level sponsors of the Olympics, including Samsung (whose ad is shown above), spend about $100 million for a four-year commitment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) If you thought there was a lot of corporate money in politics, you haven't seen the amount of cash that goes into sponsoring the U.S. Olympic games. Eleven multinational corporations each paid the International Olympic Committee an estimated $100 million for a four-year partnership that gives them coveted advertising rights during the global sporting competition. (International Olympics Committee reps won't say how much a top sponsorship deal costs, but on p. 114 of the IOC's 2014 annual report, revenue for 2013-2016 is forecast to be $5.5 billion. Sponsorship deals account for 19 percent of that.) That kind of cash makes the millions these top-tier Olympic backers shell out to lobbyists and candidates seem like chump change -- and shows that global brand exposure during one of the most-watched sporting events in the ...
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On The Organic Trade Association's Betrayal Of The Movement For Mandatory GMO Labeling 4.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Last week President Obama signed the DARK (Deny Americans their Right to Know) Act into law that pre-empts Vermont's and all other state's mandatory GMO labeling laws. This bill, passed by Congress two weeks ago, was championed by Senators Debbie Stabenow and Pat Roberts (Ranking Member and Chairman of the Senate Ag committee) along with USDA Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack. It creates a federal "non-labeling" standard for foods produced in part or entirely with genetic engineering. The legislation is a gift to the pesticide and food industries who make and sell GMOs. It allows companies to use QR codes or 1-800 numbers instead of clear on-pack labeling to disclose the presence of GMOs, forcing consumers to scan the code or make a call, effectively burying and hiding the information. Millions of American consumers have been fighting for what 64 countries around the world already require: a clear on-pack statement indicating a presence of GMO ingredients. Vermont's law was the first in the nation ...
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Al Capone’s Brother May Have Invented Date Labels For Milk 3.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Mobsters aren’t often associated with food safety ― or safety of any kind, really. But according to one tale, a notorious gangsters may have tried to make the dairy industry a little safer. In the early 1930s, mobster Ralph Capone, Al Capone’s brother and Chicago’s Public Enemy Number 3 ,  allegedly convinced  dairy producers in Illinois to stamp dates on milk bottles. Ralph knew a man whose son grew sick after drinking spoiled milk, the story goes, prompting the gangster to demand that the dairy industry beef up its health and safety standards. There’s no definitive proof that Ralph was the first to push milk producers to put date labels on their milk. We reached out to the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Agriculture and even a milk safety expert at Cornell University ― none could provide any information to substantiate the story. An online search through the records of the Illinois General Assembly proved fruitless, too.  But Ralph’s 76-year-old granddaughter, Deirdre Capone, author of ...
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11 GM foods commonly found in grocery stores 3.8.2016 TreeHugger
The new labeling law isn’t enough; if you’re looking to avoid GMOs in your diet, start here.
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How One GMO Nearly Took Down the Planet 2.8.2016 Truthout.com
The story of Klebsiella planticola is a cautionary tale of the impact of genetically modified organisms. (Image: Pixabay) On Friday, President Obama signed bill S.764 into law, dealing a major blow to the movement to require GMO labeling. The new law, called the "Deny Americans the Right to Know" (DARK) Act by food safety groups, has at least three key parts in it that undermine Vermont's popular GMO labeling bill and make it nearly impossible for you and me to know what's in our food. The law claims to set a federal labeling standard by requiring food producers to include either a QR bar code that can be scanned with a phone, or a 1-800 number that consumers can call to find out whether a product contains genetically modified ingredients. But according to the Institute for Responsible Technology, this bill doesn't require most processed foods to have a label, the bill defines genetic engineering so narrowly that most GMOs on the market don't qualify, and the bill gives the USDA two more years to come up ...
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What The Science Really Says About GMOs And Food Safety 2.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The U.S. has a new federal law that will, for the first time, require labeling of genetically modified ingredients in food . President Barack Obama signed the bill into law Friday, and the secretary of agriculture has two years to finalize the labeling standard.  The new law, which was  largely supported by the food industry , puts the U.S. in line with 64 other countries  that also require manufacturers to label genetically modified foods. Two-thirds of Americans also  support labeling GMOs . But while labels for genetically modified foods might seem sensible — or at the very least, harmless — the issue obscures some very important facts about the GMO debate.  Most notably, the law doesn’t align with scientific consensus on the safety of GMOs ― or the reality that the U.S. food system is largely made up of genetically modified foods . Here’s what the science really says about genetically engineered foods. The scientific community agrees: GMOs are safe When it comes to scientific consensus on GMO foods, ...
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