User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: May 27 2017 19:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Two Scientists, Two Different Approaches To Saving Bees From Poison Dust 27.5.2017 NPR Health Science
Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers.
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House approves bill seeking to upend EPA pesticide rule 25.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday passed a Republican-backed measure reversing an Environmental Protection Agency requirement that those spraying pesticides on or near rivers and lakes file for a permit. The chamber voted largely along party lines to approve the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2017. In the preceding floor debate, the bill’s supporters […]
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Miami's Zika Outbreak Began Months Before It Was First Detected 24.5.2017 NPR Health Science
Travelers infected with the Zika virus in the Caribbean brought it to South Florida multiple times before officials realized it had reached the U.S., an analysis of virus genomes finds.
Lawsuit Targets Potential Cancer Threat in the South's Farming Communities 23.5.2017 Truthout.com
More than 800 cancer patients nationwide are involved in a class-action lawsuit that accuses the chemical giant Monsanto of failing to adequately warn them about a possible link between their disease and glyphosate, the key ingredient in its enormously popular Roundup herbicide. The lawsuit was sparked by a 2015 determination by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) that glyphosate was a probable carcinogen, with research tying it to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a type of blood cancer, in humans. The IARC also found "convincing evidence" that glyphosate can cause cancer in laboratory animals, while other studies it reviewed found the chemical damages human DNA. Monsanto maintains that glyphosate is safe, as industry-funded studies have found. But the class-action lawsuit has unearthed documents that cast doubt on its safety -- and on the handling of its potential risks by the US Environmental Protection Agency. As the New York Times reported earlier this year: The ...
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Trump may be in trouble, but his appointees advance his startling agenda 19.5.2017 LA Times: Environment

Cable news is consumed with wall-to-wall coverage of every new development in Donald Trump’s political implosion, and liberals, still stunned by Trump’s rise to the White House, cannot get enough of it. For them, this national nightmare can’t be over soon enough.

Nevertheless, one disturbing reality...

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Lawn care companies, homeowners challenge Montgomery pesticide ban 18.5.2017 Washington Post
Lawn care companies, homeowners challenge Montgomery pesticide ban
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The Trump Administration Just Punted on How to Handle the Most Toxic Pesticides 17.5.2017 Mother Jones
Back in March, the Environmental Protection Agency abruptly reversed its own decision to ban a highly toxic insecticide called chlorpyrifos—an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is strongly suspected of hindering brain development in kids, even at tiny exposure levels. Turns out, the EPA wasn't done running interference for the chemical, a big seller for agrichemical giant Dow Agrosciences. On Monday, the agency shelved a proposal , originally scheduled to go into effect on March 6, intended to ensure that such poisons are safely applied. It was supposed to regulate "restricted use pesticides," which the EPA defines as ones with the "potential to cause unreasonable adverse effects to the environment and injury to applicators or bystanders without added restrictions." Examples (list here ) include chlorpyrifos and atrazine , a widely used herbicide linked to sex changes in frogs and cancer in people . Currently, anyone who applies pesticides on the restricted-use list has to have safety training. The ...
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Trump's EPA Greenlights a Nasty Chemical. A Month Later, It Poisons a Bunch of Farmworkers. 15.5.2017 Mother Jones
On May 5, more than 50 farmworkers outside of Bakersfield, California, were exposed to a highly toxic pesticide that apparently drifted from a nearby field—at a high enough level that "twelve people reported symptoms of vomiting [and] nausea and one person fainted," reports the television news station Kern Golden Empire. "An additional twelve workers did not show signs of any symptoms," the station reported. "However more than half of the farm workers left before medical aide arrived." Public health authorities took the poisoning quite seriously. "Anybody that was exposed, that was here today, we encourage them to seek medical attention immediately. Don't wait. Particularly if you're suffering from any symptoms. Whether it's nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, seek medical attention immediately," Michelle Corson, public relations officer at Kern County Public Health, said in an announcement to the TV station. According to the news report, the poisoning was caused by a chemical called chlorpyrifos. A spokeswoman ...
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The labels said ‘organic.’ But these massive imports of corn and soybeans weren’t. 13.5.2017 Washington Post
The labels said ‘organic.’ But these massive imports of corn and soybeans weren’t.
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New Zealand’s ambitious plan to save birds: Kill every rat 12.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — New Zealand has set itself an environmental goal so ambitious it’s been compared to putting a man on the moon: ridding the entire nation of every last rat, opossum and stoat. The idea is to give a second chance to the distinctive birds that once ruled this South Pacific nation. […]
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As the seed treatment market grows, so do pesticide concerns 11.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The use of insecticides on seeds has sparked controversy after studies have shown the chemicals can be harmful to bees. One of the largest pesticide companies in the world has a research facility here in Minnesota, developing and testing these seed coatings.
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Memphis Firefighter Selected as One of 10 Nationwide to Participate in Effort to Identify the Toxic Chemicals Around Us 10.5.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Memphis Firefighter Selected as One of 10 Nationwide to Participate in Effort to Identify the Toxic Chemicals Around Us
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It's time to make soil great again 6.5.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Restoring soil fertility is one of humanity’s best options for making progress on three daunting challenges: Feeding everyone, weathering climate change and conserving biodiversity.
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The Other 100 Days: 5 Decades Before Trump, the New EPA Truly Made America Great Again 28.4.2017 Mother Jones
On New Year's Day in 1970, President Richard Nixon appeared in San Clemente, California, for the momentous signing of the National Environmental Policy Act—the congressional statute that formally recast the government's role from conserving the wilderness to protecting the health of the environment and the general public. In the previous decade, rising unrest over the link between pollution and poor health—spurred forward by Rachel Carson's groundbreaking 1962 exposé Silent Spring and Lady Bird Johnson's beautification campaign —gave birth to a burgeoning environmental movement demanding strong and urgent action from the federal government. Nixon, who was largely indifferent to environmental issues but sensitive about his own popularity, succumbed to the public pressure. There was no evidence of any indifference in San Clemente that day when he laid out his new vision for the decade: "The 1970s absolutely must be the years when America pays its debt to the past by reclaiming the purity of its air, its ...
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How soil sparked a new sustainable ag movement 28.4.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
As word gets around that soil is alive, farmers have adopted a whole new attitude toward their land.
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"Superman Is Not Coming": Erin Brockovich on the Future of Water 27.4.2017 Truthout.com
Erin Brockovich speaks at the 2016 Arizona Ultimate Women's Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 9, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) "It's not just one Flint. It's hundreds of Flints," says environmental activist Erin Brockovich, describing how water supplies throughout the US have become repositories for industrial waste. More than 200 million Americans are exposed to the carcinogen Chromium 6 alone. With regulation-blocking Scott Pruitt in charge of our drinking water, we must mobilize to prevent widespread illness and death. Erin Brockovich speaks at the 2016 Arizona Ultimate Women's Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 9, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) Want to see more original stories like this? Make a tax-deductible donation to support the independent investigative reporting and analysis at Truthout! Come take a ride on America's toxic water slide: First stop: Flint, Michigan, where two years later, people are still contending with lead-laced ...
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No, California, Roundup won't give you cancer 27.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The chemophobes who run California are at it again, siding with environmental activists and pseudoscience rather than evidence and common sense.

The state Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment announced last month that it was adding the weed-killer glyphosate to its list of chemicals...

Trump Has Okayed a Pesticide That Terrifies These Families 19.4.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. A white cloud of pesticides had drifted into Fidelia Morales's back yard, coating her children's swing set. The 40-year-old mother of five gestured toward the citrus groves that surround her house in California's Central Valley as she recounted when an air blast sprayer sent chemicals floating onto her property last year – landing on her family's red and blue jungle gym. "We know this is dangerous for the kids, but what are we supposed to do?" she said on a recent afternoon, speaking in Spanish through a translator. Morales said she fears that these kinds of drifts, as well as long-term exposure to a variety of chemicals in the air, have hurt her children, ages 9 to 20, who have struggled to focus in school and have suffered from bronchitis, asthma and other chronic illnesses. Under Barack Obama, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an agricultural ban on chlorpyrifos, ...
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6 Ways Trump's Administration Could Literally Make America More Toxic 17.4.2017 Mother Jones
In late March, chlorpyrifos, a pesticide commonly used to ward off insects on fruit and vegetable crops, was nearing the end of a decade-long review process. There's strong evidence suggesting that the insecticide inhibits kids' brain development, and at least 80,000 scientists, environmentalists, and members of the public had signed a petition urging the Environmental Protection Agency to ban the stuff outright. But in the final stages of review, EPA director Scott Pruitt greenlighted the chemical instead , arguing there was insufficient evidence to ban it. Now farmers can continue to apply it to crops like corn, strawberries, almonds, and tomatoes. This year, more controversial pesticides are due for agency review, a process that weighs the latest scientific findings with public comment to determine whether the substance can continue to be used—though the White House has the final say. These reviews often lag for many years. And Trump's EPA, with its anti-regulatory bent and a new administrator plucked ...
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