User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Biotech
Last updated: Sep 20 2017 05:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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FDA clears cheaper biotech drug copycats, but buying them isn’t easy 20.9.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
In 2016, Roche sold $3 billion worth of its blockbuster biotechnology drug Avastin. Last week, the Food and Drug Administration approved what’s expected to be a less-expensive version. Patients and insurers won’t be able to count the savings any time soon. Of seven biosimilar drugs the FDA has cleared since the first approval of one of the drugs in 2015, only three are available for sale. The rest are tied up in legal disputes that can block the cheaper versions for years. “Basically, there’s a gazillion patents,” said Gillian Woollett, senior vice president at the consulting firm Avalere Health and an expert on the drugs.
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Scientists Try To Fight Crop Damage With An Invasive Moth's Own DNA 28.8.2017 NPR News
The diamondback moth attacks cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower, costing farmers billions of dollars every year. But will these lab-bred insects inherit the same stigma as genetically modified crops?
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Gilead is buying Santa Monica biotech firm Kite Pharma for $11.9 billion 28.8.2017 LA Times: Business

Santa Monica biotech firm Kite Pharma Inc., which specializes in cancer-fighting treatments, is being acquired by industry giant Gilead Sciences Inc. for $11.9 billion, the companies announced Monday.

Kite Pharma has a cell therapy treatment for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma under review by the Food and...

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NantHealth to cut 300 employees, will sell some assets to Allscripts 12.8.2017 LA Times: Business

Los Angeles billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong’s NantHealth Inc. said it would cut about 300 employees and sell some assets as the biotech company looks to focus on artificial intelligence for cancer treatment.

The Culver City company said Thursday that it signed an agreement to sell its provider...

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'Path to GMO humans' presents 'profound ethical issues' 9.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

To the editor: As pointed out in your editorial, the ethics related to gene editing are extremely complicated. This is especially true in today’s pragmatic culture. (Re “The path to GMO humans,” Editorial, Aug. 4)

All so-called improvements are not good. Although much good can come out of gene...

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When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice 9.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
CRISPR gene editing can fight crop disease far more benignly than conventional practices.
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Why environmentalists want Impossible Burger's meatless patties to be pulled off menus 9.8.2017 LA Times: Business

The plant-based Impossible Burger seemed like the kind of breakthrough in food technology that environmentalists could get behind.

The Silicon Valley makers of the fake meat that famously “bleeds” are championing a more sustainable food system by trying to reduce the dependence on intensive animal...

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GMO salmon caught in U.S. regulatory net, but Canadians have eaten 5 tons 5.8.2017 Washington Post
GMO salmon caught in U.S. regulatory net, but Canadians have eaten 5 tons
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Sponsored: Skills gap creates demand for biotech expertise 4.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Hands-on training in cutting-edge techniques, technologies and equipment opens new career paths.
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Canada OKs Idaho company’s genetically engineered potatoes 4.8.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Canadian officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered by an Idaho company to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat. The approval confirmed by Health Canada officials on Thursday means the J.R. Simplot Co. potatoes can be imported, planted […]
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The ethics of creating GMO humans 3.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

In a process that can be likened to the creation of GMO crops, scientists have edited genes in human embryos in order to eliminate a mutation that causes thickening of the heart wall. The embryos were created solely for the scientists’ study and will not be implanted. Nonetheless, the research...

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Seattle Genetics buys biotech factory in Bothell 2.8.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology
Seattle Genetics has agreed to buy the Bristol-Myers Squibb manufacturing plant in Bothell for $43.3 million, giving the biotech the ability to make its own bulk quantities of antibodies for treating cancer.
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A Future of Genetically Engineered Children Is Closer Than You’d Think 1.8.2017 Mother Jones
The first step is a no-brainer. Say you are one of the tens of thousands of people with Huntington’s disease, a terrible, hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene. The diseased version of the gene makes an abnormally long protein that becomes toxic in your neurons, eventually killing them. Symptoms usually […]
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Seattle biotech Alpine Immune Sciences goes public through merger 26.7.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

The company, which develops immunotherapies to potentially treat cancers and inflammatory diseases, went public by merging with another biotech, NivalisTherapeutics of Boulder, Colo.
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The Biotech Industry Is Taking Over the Regulation of GMOs From the Inside 24.7.2017 Truthout.com
The British non-profit GMWatch recently revealed the agribusiness takeover of Conabia, the National Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology of Argentina. Conabia is the GMO assessment body of Argentina. According to GMWatch, 26 of 34 its members were either agribusiness company employees or had major conflicts of interest.* Packing a regulatory agency with conflicted individuals is one way to ensure speedy GMO approvals and Conabia has certainly delivered that. A much more subtle, but ultimately more powerful, way is to bake approval into the structure of the GMO assessment process itself. It is easier than you might think. I recently attended the latest international conference of GMO regulators, called ISBGMO14 , held in Guadalajara, Mexico (June 4-8, 2017). ISBGMO is run by the International Society for Biosafety Research ( ISBR ). When I first went to this biennial series of conferences, in 2007, just one presentation in the whole four days was by a company. ISBR had some aspirations towards ...
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10 mega myths about farming to remember on your next grocery run 24.7.2017 Washington Post
10 mega myths about farming to remember on your next grocery run
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Keith Kloor’s Endearing Love Affair With GMOs 20.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New York University’s adjunct journalism professor has curious ideas about science and reporting
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'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing The Immune System Clears Key Hurdle 13.7.2017 NPR: All Things Considered
An advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration recommends the agency, for the first time, approve a new kind of treatment that uses genetically modified immune cells to attack cancer cells.
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Sarson Satyagraha: Activists up in arms over genetically modified food 2.7.2017 Chandigarh – The Indian Express
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Documentary 'Food Evolution' turns to reason to discuss GMO controversy 30.6.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Calm, careful, potentially revolutionary, "Food Evolution" is an iconoclastic documentary on a hot-button topic. Persuasive rather than polemical, it's the unusual issue film that deals in counterintuitive reason rather than barely controlled hysteria.

As directed by Scott Hamilton Kennedy, "Food...

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