User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Nov 17 2017 16:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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US health agency to crack down on risky stem cell offerings 17.11.2017 Science / Technology News

U.S. health authorities say they will crack down on doctors pushing stem cell therapies that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that has received little oversight. The Food and Drug Administration laid out its plan Thursday for regulating cell-based medicine, including hundreds of private clinics that have opened across the nation in the last decade.

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By Treating Overdoses Like Murder, Prosecutors Are Making the Opioid Crisis Deadlier 8.11.2017 Truthout.com
The push for murder charges against people who share drugs or sell small amounts of opioids to support their own addictions is only driving vulnerable people further into the shadows of a deadly crisis, advocates say. The resources spent on these prosecutions would be better spent on treatment and harm reduction efforts. Activists attend a protest denouncing the city's "inadequate and wrongheaded response" to the overdose crisis, outside of the NYPD headquarters, August 10, 2017, in New York City. (Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images) Peter Bruun and his family were not going to let another young life be destroyed. In 2014, Bruun's 24-year-old daughter Elisif contacted her friend Sean Harrington while she was receiving treatment for heroin addiction at a mental wellness facility in North Carolina. She asked Harrington, who struggled with the same addiction and was living houseless in Philadelphia at the time, to send her heroin in the mail. Harrington agreed. Elisif overdosed and died at the treatment ...
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Trump's Plan for a "Drug-Free Society" Won't Fix the Opioid Problem, Experts Say 27.10.2017 Truthout.com
President Trump declared opioid addiction and overdoses a public health emergency on Thursday in an address steeped in drug war rhetoric, but experts on the front lines of the crisis say new White House directives do not go far enough to expand access to crucial health care services. Meanwhile, the GOP's own budget-cutting agenda may be undermining efforts to respond to opioids.  Donald Trump greets a guest during an event highlighting the opioid crisis in the US October 26, 2017, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) Want to see more coverage of the issues that matter? Make a donation to Truthout to ensure that we can publish more original stories like this one. President Donald Trump declared opioid addiction and overdoses a public health emergency on Thursday. Is this announcement a victory for public health? Trump is directing federal health officials to remove a few regulations that create barriers to addiction treatment. However, experts on the ...
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The Feds Spent Millions Seizing 5 Million Marijuana Plants in 2016, Did Not Solve Any Drug Problems 18.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Rainer Vandalismus ) Even as he talks about declaring the opioid crisis a national emergency, Trump is actively seeking to cut Medicaid and undermine the Affordable Care Act, which extended access to addiction treatment for millions. It's time Congress acted to push government toward public health solutions for the US's drug problems rather than pouring money into failed law enforcement policies. Want to see more coverage of the issues that matter? Make a donation to Truthout to ensure that we can publish more original stories like this one. Last year, the Drug Enforcement Agency's marijuana eradication program confiscated 5.3 million marijuana plants in operations nationwide, a 20 percent increase from the year before and by far the heaviest haul since President Obama's first term in office. The DEA pulled 3.5 million plants in California, more than any other state by a long shot, even as Californians voted to legalize cannabis for recreational use. The DEA still spends millions of dollars every ...
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Top Mental Health Researcher Suggests Link Between Opioid Overdoses and Suicides 5.10.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, believes more work must be done on connections between suicidal thoughts and overdoses.
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Consumer Product Safety Commission Cracks Down on Flame Retardants Linked to Health Problems 4.10.2017 Truthout.com
The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the independent federal commission charged with product safety, voted on September 20, 2017 to take steps toward protecting consumers and firefighters from the hazards posed by the  organohalogen  class of  flame retardants . "The vote is a rare victory for health groups and a rare setback for industry groups during the first months of President  Donald Trump 's administration," writes the  Chicago Tribune . CPSC Moves to Protect Consumers and Fire Fighters The organohalogen class of flame retardants has been shown to leach from the products, or "migrate widely," resulting in human exposure. This class of chemicals have been found in the bodies of  97% of Americans  says the Center for Disease Control. They have been  linked  to cancer, neurological deficits, hormone disruption and other health problems. Just last month,  a study by the Harvard Chan School of Public Health  found that flame retardants reduced the likelihood of clinical pregnancy and live ...
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Federal Requests For Patient Info Raise Red Flags In States That Allow Medical Pot Use 13.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"With the anti-marijuana rhetoric coming from the Trump administration’s Department of Justice, you do have to wonder what the true motivation is here.”
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Sexism, Racism and Classism Are Fueling the Opioid Crisis 10.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Tori Herr dreamed of becoming a veterinarian or a journalist. She was only 18 years old when she died in a Pennsylvania jail. After Tori was arrested on drug charges in 2015, she began suffering from heroin withdrawal in jail. She was denied medical treatment, and her cellmate was threatened with punishment for attempting CPR when Tori collapsed. By the time medical staff arrived, Tori hadn't been breathing for 10 minutes. "I would've loved to see what her future would've been," Tori's mother, Stephanie Moyer, told the local news . But as Moyer points out, Tori was "sentenced to death before she even saw the judge." Tori's death was not an isolated incident. More and more women are dying from causes related to opioid use, and the state's response has been criminalization, not care. In 2015, 418 women in Tori's home state of Pennsylvania died from opioid overdoses, a marked rise from previous years. This increase mirrors a rise in overdose deaths among women across the nation. Although men still use ...
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Why You Think Weed Is Bad (And Why You're Wrong) 6.9.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marijuana does not have to get you high in order to help your health
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When All the World's a War -- And All the Men and Women Merely Soldiers 15.8.2017 Truthout.com
When we declare war on phenomena like crime, drugs, or terror, instantly militarizing such problems, we severely limit our means for understanding and dealing with them. (Photo: Pixabay ) Since September 11, 2001, the United States has been fighting a "war on terror." Real soldiers have been deployed to distant lands; real cluster bombs and white phosphorus have been used; real cruise missiles have been launched; the first  MOAB , the largest non-nuclear bomb in the US arsenal, has been dropped; and real cities have been  reduced to rubble . In revenge for the deaths of  2,977 civilians  that day, real people --  in the millions  -- have died and millions more have  become refugees . But is the war on terror actually a war at all -- or is it only a metaphor? In a real war, nations or organized non-state actors square off against each other. A metaphorical war is like a real war -- after all, that's what a metaphor is, a way of saying that one thing is like something else -- but the enemy isn't a country ...
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Marijuana use may up death risk of from hypertension 15.8.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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Marijuana ups risk of death from hypertension 10.8.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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Washington's Marijuana Legalization: The Kids Are Alright 1.8.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Legalization did not turn teenagers into marijuana addicts
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Will Ontario let landlords and condominiums ban smoking recreational marijuana? 28.7.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health The federal government's proposed Cannabis Act, if passed, will legalize and regulate the production, sale and possession of recreational marijuana across Canada by July 2018. However, each of the provinces have decisions to make about how cannabis will be used, sold and regulated in their province. Until July 31, 2017, Ontarians can share feedback through a survey asking how the government should approach legalizing marijuana in Ontario. The survey asks for input in five areas: (1) the minimum age someone can use, keep and buy cannabis, (2) where cannabis can be used, (3) road safety, (4) regulating sales of cannabis, and (5) planning public education. One important question is where cannabis can be used: where will individuals be allowed to smoke marijuana and who gets to decide that? As marijuana is legalized by the federal government, it will be up to the Province to regulate how it can be used in some spheres. For instance, the Province could restrict the ability of landlords and ...
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The Radicals Were Always Right: Now Is the Time to Decriminalize All Drugs 25.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Marijuana legalization advocates and members of community groups attend a rally in front of One Police Plaza on June 13, 2012, in New York City. (Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Treating drug users as whole people with human rights rather than as criminals used to be considered a radical act but that is changing. Mass incarceration and a far-reaching opioid crisis are forcing even former anti-drug crusaders to consider tackling addition as a health issue rather than a criminal one. Marijuana legalization advocates and members of community groups attend a rally in front of One Police Plaza on June 13, 2012, in New York City. (Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images) This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids recently startled me with a blog post titled, "Why You Shouldn't Use the Word Addict." Drug addiction is a disease, the  blog  explains. ...
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4 Reasons Why The US Needs To Decriminalize Drugs – And Why We're Closer Than You Think 11.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Drug possession arrests fuel mass incarceration and mass criminalization.
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Sheriff In Heart Of Ohio's Opioid Epidemic Refuses To Carry Overdose Reversal Drug 8.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
More than 150 people died of heroin- or fentanyl-related overdoses in Butler County last year.
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Drug Arrest: One Nigerian in hospital, other in judicial remand 30.6.2017 Chandigarh – The Indian Express
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Stop The Opioid Epidemic Before It Stops Us 26.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Deaths from opioid overdoses are skyrocketing across the country. Unless we take immediate action, the nation is about to witness a tsunami of drug-related deaths unlike anything we have seen since crack cocaine ravaged the country a generation ago. A recent investigation by the New York Times estimates 59,000 people died in 2016 from drug overdoses, making it the leading cause of death for Americans under age 50. Figures from three Oregon counties indicate that for each person who dies of an overdose, 26 experience non-fatal overdoses, and 100 are dependent on or addicted to opioids. The median age when people start injecting drugs is 21, which explains the surge in adolescent overdoses this year in states like Maryland, Florida, Pennsylvania, Maine and Ohio. State law enforcement chiefs are banding together to investigate the role drug makers may be playing in the wave of addiction, overdoses and deaths. As the head of Covenant House , the largest charity in the nation serving homeless, trafficked and ...
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Psychedelic Mushrooms And LSD Are Among The Safest Recreational Drugs, Survey Finds 25.5.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Governments around the world consider mushrooms and LSD to be among the most dangerous illicit substances , but a new survey of drug users suggests that these psychedelics are actually some of the safest. Around 20,000 people reported having used either mushrooms, which contain the psychoactive compound psilocybin, or LSD in the past year, according to the  2017 Global Drug Survey . Of those, just over 100 people reported seeking emergency medical treatment related to those drugs. Most of these cases were linked to LSD ― a total of 1 percent of recent LSD users and just 0.2 percent of recent mushroom users sought treatment. By that metric, the survey concludes that mushrooms are the safest recreational drug. LSD ranked a close third behind marijuana, as 0.6 percent of people who’d used cannabis over the past year reported receiving emergency medical care. All three drugs were less dangerous than alcohol, which was by far the most widely used intoxicant in the survey and led to 1.3 percent of all recent ...
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