User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Jun 22 2016 24:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Supervised Injection Facilities Are Safe Houses, Not Crack Houses 21.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
SIFs are medically supervised sites where drug users are able to inject pre-obtained substances under the supervision of medical professionals who can administer the overdose reversal drug, Naloxone , as well as connect participants to treatment, detox, and other services . SIF supporters call them a necessary, common-sense public health intervention for curbing the incidence of death, disease, and infection associated with public injecting. Cities around the country, from Seattle , Baltimore , San Francisco , New York City , and even Ithaca, New York , are all making strides to establish the first legal site of its kind in the United States. While supervised injection facilities are nothing new , opening a SIF in the United States is part of a new wave of solutions grounded in compassion, reason and public health. Yet some Americans believe that the mainstreaming of the supervised injection facility conversation in the US is, arguably, prompted by the changing public face of the heroin epidemic. By all ...
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Health Canada considers allowing use of prescription heroin 10.6.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
rey-2016-06-10a.mp3 There are encouraging signs that the Liberal government will take a radically different approach to harm reduction. Pivot Legal says prescription heroin is a crucial tool in addiction treatment. Doug King is a lawyer with Pivot Legal. He explains why access to diacetylmorphine is so important for chronic heroin addicts. Doug King speaks with Redeye host Esther Hsieh. Check out our  website for more information about Redeye. Find us on Facebook and like our  page  for regular ...
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TODAY: Elected Officials, Community Members and Civil Rights Groups Demand Racial Equity in New York's Response to the Heroin and Opioid Crisis 9.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Today, elected officials, community members, civil rights and legal advocates, and drug policy reformers joined together to call for the inclusion of communities of color in Albany’s response to heroin and opioids. In the midst of the opioid crisis, lawmakers and the media have increasingly highlighted strategies that treat drug use as a public health issue. But despite the rhetoric, the overwhelming emphasis of New York drug policy remains on criminalization, which is disproportionately focused on people of color.

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When Someone You Love Dies in Police Custody and They Blame 'Excited Delirium' 7.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
by Tana Ganeva The following article first appeared on The Influence . Follow them on Twitter and Facebook. Julie Cobio Firkins prayed and then walked into a room to watch her 33-year-old husband die. "The video that you're going to see is very sad," she remembers the officer warning her--twice--before playing footage from a police bodycam. But as the tape rolled, she had a different thought: "It was brutal, not sad." Why were all those officers tasing her husband, over and over, while he lay under a trailer truck? And why, once they had him in handcuffs, didn't they help him more when he cried out that he couldn't breathe? "If you're talking, you're breathing, dude," an officer said. *** On a clear, mild night in April 2013, at just after three, an Idaho man named Bobby Muse called 911 because he thought he heard a woman screaming. Two Nampa County police officers drove to a neighborhood in Nampa known to police as a place where trouble happens. But on their way to the call, officer Eric Duke noticed a ...
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Alabama Mom's Charges Are Dropped, but Only After an Arduous Battle 5.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Sixteen months after her arrest, Katie Darovitz -- one of at least 500 women prosecuted under Alabama's toughest-in-the-nation chemical endangerment law -- has had her case dismissed. Darovitz's story, first  chronicled by ProPublica  last year, was especially wrenching: She has severe epilepsy, and doctors told her that the medications she was using to treat her condition carry a risk of miscarriage and birth defects. When she got pregnant in 2014, she discovered marijuana could control her seizures and had not been associated with birth defects. But when she gave birth, hospital staffers turned over her positive marijuana screen to a social worker who turned it over to law enforcement officials. Two police officers showed up at the house Darovitz shared with her common-law husband and their two-week-old son, handcuffed her, and hauled her off to jail. Though her son, Will, was in good health, Darovitz was charged with a Class C felony -- punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Darovitz's mother-in-law, ...
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Prince’s Death Reveals How Hard It Is To Escape Opioid Addiction 3.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
When Prince reached out to Dr. Howard Kornfeld, a California-based chronic pain and addiction specialist, Kornfeld wasn't immediately available to go see him. Instead, the doctor put his son Andrew on a plane to Minnesota to deliver the singer's buprenorphine, a drug used to treat opioid addiction. That was a big mistake, experts say. " If it's an emergency, call 911, for God's sake ," Dr. Mark Willenbring, a former director of treatment research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, told The Associated Press. "Don't send your pre-med son on a redeye."  While it's possible the pop icon contacted an out-of-state addiction expert for privacy reasons, Willenbring noted that his own office is a mere 20-minute drive from Paisley Park, and said he's authorized to prescribe buprenorphine, which is a controlled substance in Minnesota. Prince died in April at age 57, after Kornfeld's son arrived at the singer's home to find him unresponsive in an elevator and subsequently called ...
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A Look At Rikers Island's Legacy Of Medication-Assisted Opioid Treatment 23.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This piece comes to us courtesy of Stateline. Stateline is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news service of the Pew Charitable Trusts that provides daily reporting and analysis on trends in state policy. NEW YORK — For Dr. Ross Macdonald, every person who enters New York City’s main jail with an opioid addiction represents an opportunity for treatment, and the possibility of saving a life. As the medical director of the city’s correctional health program, he ensures that offenders who come in on methadone continue to receive it. And he and his staff try to persuade as many addicted inmates as possible to get started on methadone before they leave the jail. Rikers Island Correctional Facility has run a model opioid treatment program since 1987, and it has assisted tens of thousands of inmates in maintaining treatment after they return to their communities. Medical researchers have repeatedly found that the jail’s methadone treatment program has resulted in overall health care cost savings, reduced crime and ...
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Big Pharma Seeks to Capitalize on Pain-Reducing Compound Derived From Cannabis 21.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: Lauren Walker / Truthout ) Cannabidiol, or CBD, a compound found in cannabis, has been shown to reduce pain and inflammation, and have other medicinal uses -- and it has no euphoric properties, like marijuana. Still, regulators debate its legal status, while Big Pharma attempts to corner the CBD market. Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this one: We depend on reader support! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation today. The medicinal properties of cannabidiol (better known as CBD), a compound found in the Cannabis sativa L. plant species, are quickly drawing the attention of scientists, plant-medicine lovers, dietary-supplement companies, venture capitalists, professional athletes and Big Pharma -- not to mention people living with serious, chronic medical conditions. Insiders predict the burgeoning market will be as profitable as the NFL. Today, if you run a search on PubMed.gov , a medical research database, you'll find more than 1,500 academic articles on cannabidiol. Unlike ...
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Purdue Pharma: Corporate Fraud With a Body Count 18.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The LA Times investigation of Purdue Pharma's manufacture and marketing of the narcotic painkiller OxyContin published last week should be regarded as a standard case study in corporate fraud. Except this particular tale also features a body count. This fact does nothing to call into question the validity of corporate fraud framework for understanding the story of OxyContin; it only makes its principal victims more visible, and the misbehavior in question more abhorrent, than is typical for the genre. All the major features of Purdue's handling of OxyContin conform to similar acts of corporate fraud perpetrated in recent years: it encompasses not only what the company did (lie to generate profit), but what government regulatory agencies failed to do (detect and expose those lies), as well as the absence of any serious legal or other penalties imposed on Purdue Pharma as a result (a $634.5 million fine on a drug that has earned it $31 billion in revenue, or 2 percent of earnings). Still the story is ...
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9 Things You Should Know If Your Child Is Using Heroin 14.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
by Jeremy Galloway The recent spike in the use of heroin and other opioids, sparking frightening headlines about addiction and overdose, has left families struggling to find solutions. When my family discovered I was using heroin over a decade ago, when I was in my mid-20s, they spent years trying to help, but didn't know where to begin. Together, we learned the hard way that many potential "fixes" end up being dead ends. Some might cause even more harm. There are so many things which, had we known them then, might have spared us years of pain and strained relationships. This isn't a comprehensive guide, but these tips should be a helpful starting point for family members looking for answers. 1. Who's to Blame? Well, It's Just Not That Simple... Experimenting with substances is normal. People have been using psychoactive substances for thousands of years and only a fraction of us become addicted . Contrary to the "gateway theory," only 4 percent of Americans who try marijuana go on to experiment with ...
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Walgreens Broaches Possible Health Benefits Of Medical Marijuana 1.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Walgreens wants to talk about marijuana. In what appears to be an unprecedented move for a company its size, Walgreens published a discussion of the possible health benefits of medical marijuana on its health and wellness blog  this week. In the post, titled "Clarifying Clinical Cannabis," a resident pharmacist at the company takes a look at medical marijuana's side effects, the debate about its medicinal properties and its legality: "Research has indicated it may impair your lungs, memory and judgment. However, research has also shown marijuana provides pain relief in ways traditional pain medicines don’t. Medical marijuana can improve appetite and relieve nausea in those who have cancer and it may help relieve symptoms such as muscle stiffness in people who have multiple sclerosis." It's not exactly clear what the company's intentions are. Its parent company, Walgreen Co., isn't ready to say it's throwing its hat in the ring of an industry whose recreational and medical sales topped out at  $5.4 ...
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Americans Are As Worried About Bad Water As Heroin 30.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Contaminated drinking water ranks behind only cancer and heroin abuse as a serious health problem facing the U.S., according to a new survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The poll asked whether people considered a range of health problems "extremely serious." Thirty-five percent felt that way about contaminated drinking water, the same percentage as for heroin abuse.  The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, has focused national attention on the problem of aging water systems with crumbling pipes that deposit lead in people's drinking water.  In Flint, the pipes crumbled extra quickly after the city started pumping water from the Flint River in April of 2014. Contrary to regulatory requirements, state regulators told city officials not to treat the water with anti-corrosion chemicals designed to reduce the amount of lead that leaches from pipes into the water. Research eventually showed higher blood lead levels in Flint children following the water switch. Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (R) ...
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This Opioid Treatment Model That Provides All Levels Of Care Is Spawning Imitators 27.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This piece comes to us courtesy of Stateline. Stateline is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news service of the Pew Charitable Trusts that provides daily reporting and analysis on trends in state policy. BALTIMORE — Dr. Kenneth Stoller held court on the sidewalk outside the Broadway Center for Addiction on a sunny afternoon last week, chatting with a troop of lingering patients. He beamed as he patted a young man on the shoulder and said he’d see him tomorrow. “It’s important for patients to see this as a place that’s safe and accepting,” he said. “For some, it’s the first place they’ve gotten positive reinforcement in their lives.” Operated by Johns Hopkins Hospital and located two blocks from its main campus, the Broadway Center — or “911” as it’s called because of its address at 911 N. Broadway — has provided methadone maintenance therapy for people with opioid addiction for more than two decades. But unlike most of the roughly 1,400 methadone clinics across the country, the Broadway Center offers not only ...
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Podcast: What’s with the Western pot boom? 21.4.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Amid a patchwork of regulations, marijuana is becoming a legitimate industry.
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Landmark UN Session Falling Short of Lofty Goal to End War on Drugs 20.4.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

World leaders are gathered in New York this week for the first United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs in almost two decades, with the lofty goal of ending the failed War on Drugs.

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Thursday Press Conference: World Leaders Call for Decriminalization and Regulation of Drugs during Historic UN Special Session 20.4.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

On Thursday April 21 – the last day of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs – several members of the Global Commission on Drug Policy will hold a press conference in New York. The Global Commission will evaluate the outcome of the UN meeting and call for concrete steps to ensure more effective drug policy reform in the years ahead. The UNGASS is taking place in New York from April 19-21 and is the first such gathering of governments in 18 years.

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Ahead Of A Key Meeting, Russia Is Driving Global Drug Policy Into The Ground 13.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
As the first major global meeting on drug policy in two decades approaches, Russia is quietly emerging as a powerful force working to perpetuate the war on drugs in the face of growing weariness with the quagmire worldwide. Later in April, the United Nations will convene a special session on drug policy aimed at shaping the global approach in the decades to come. Key nations convened last month in Vienna to move the negotiations forward ahead of the gathering, and Russia threw up roadblocks at every opportunity. The Russian representative dominated the talks, according to one non-American delegate who took part in the negotiations. The Russian Federation pushed back against the medical use of painkillers for palliative care, against needle exchange, against educating doctors or the public about opioids, against the use of Naloxone -- an overdose reversal drug -- in any setting outside a medical facility, against the entire concept of “harm reduction,” against substitute opioid treatment and, in the end, ...
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On the News With Thom Hartmann: Treasury Department Cracks Down on Corporate Inversions, and More 11.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In today's On the News segment: The US Treasury Department is cracking down on corporate inversions; the US ranks 14th in the world for financial literacy; Obamacare has not led to the end of employer-provided health coverage; and more. TRANSCRIPT: Thom Hartmann here -- on the best of the rest of Economic and Labor News... You need to know this. The US Treasury Department is cracking down on corporate inversions. In response to the proposed merger between pharmaceutical giants Allergan and Pfizer, the Treasury Department proposed new rules that would "wipe out" the massive tax benefits of the largest corporate inversion in our nation's history. If those two companies had been allowed to merge, Pfizer would have been able to claim the lower corporate tax rate from Ireland, where Allergan is headquartered. That would have allowed Pfizer to skip out on paying their taxes on at least $40 billion dollars of profit that company earned while headquartered in the United States, then stashed away in overseas tax ...
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Nebraska and Oklahoma vs. Colorado: Irony Flows 8.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The U.S. Supreme Court recently declined to hear a lawsuit brought by Nebraska and Oklahoma opposing Colorado's regulation of the sale and cultivation of legalized marijuana. The reaction has been a mixed bag. The challenge and its ultimate dismissal have provided a smorgasbord of topics to be served up and savored -- from scholarly debates on jurisdiction, federalism, states' rights and constitutional law, to crystal ball predictions as to what this foretells for the future of marijuana legalization. As a former prosecutor, what is striking to me is that throughout the fabric of this diverse commentary, a common thread steadily rocks along embroidering its name across the landscape -- irony. Nebraska and Oklahoma did not challenge Colorado's legalization of marijuana. They conceded that Colorado has the power to legalize the production, distribution, possession and use of marijuana. Rather, they criticized the Justice Department for turning its back on enforcing federal law, thereby allowing it to be ...
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Tuesday: California Assembly Committee Hearing on Supervised Consumption Services for People Who Use Drugs 4.4.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Tuesday, April 5, the California Assembly Public Safety Committee will hold a legislative hearing on AB 2495 (Eggman) to permit localities to establish supervised consumption services (SCS), which allow individuals to consume controlled substances in a safe space, provide sterile equipment, and connect patients to treatment, medical care, and other social services.

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