User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Nov 21 2014 05:05 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 726    
U.S. House Bill Introduced to Overturn Ban on Veterans Affairs Physicians Recommending Medical Marijuana 21.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds 19.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Over the past few years, research has revealed that marijuana can both destroy certain cancer cells and reduce the growth of others. Now, a new study in mice has found that when combined with radiation treatment, cannabis can effectively shrink one of the most aggressive types of brain tumors. In a paper published Friday in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapies, a team of researchers from St. George's University of London outlined the "dramatic reductions" they observed in high-grade glioma masses, a deadly form of brain cancer, when treated with a combination of radiation and two different marijuana compounds, also known as cannabinoids. In many cases, those tumors shrunk to as low as one-tenth the sizes of those in the control group. "We've shown that cannabinoids could play a role in treating one of the most aggressive cancers in adults," Dr. Wai Liu, one of the study's lead authors, wrote in an op-ed earlier this week. "The results are promising...it could provide a way of breaking through glioma ...
Also found in: [+]
Colorado Authorities Still Want Review Of Marijuana Edibles And Drinks 17.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
DENVER (AP) — Saying they're still worried that edible pot sweets are too attractive to kids, Colorado health authorities plan to ask Monday for a new panel to decide which marijuana foods and drinks look too much like regular snacks. A Health Department recommendation, obtained by The Associated Press in advance of a final meeting Monday on edible marijuana regulations, suggests a new state commission to give "pre-market approval" before food or drinks containing pot can be sold. The recommendation comes a month after the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment suggested banning the sale of most kinds of edible pot. That suggestion was quickly retracted after it went public. Marijuana-infused foods and drinks have been a booming sector in Colorado's new recreational marijuana market. But lawmakers feared the products are too easy to confuse with regular foods and drinks and ordered marijuana regulators to require a new look for marijuana edibles. The new Health Department suggestion calls ...
Also found in: [+]
Colorado Is Using Revenue From Pot Sales To Hire More School Nurses 15.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Colorado’s decision to legalize marijuana could actually help improve the health of local students. The state awarded nearly a million dollars' worth of grants to schools throughout the state this week , reports The Denver Post. The grant money will be used by schools to hire health professionals such as nurses, psychologists and counselors and it's composed of funds from marijuana tax revenue. The more than $975,000 of grants handed out this week is part of a larger fund of $2.5 million created by the state legislature for schools to hire health professionals, says the outlet. The window for schools to apply for the rest of the funds closed last week. Overall, a great deal of tax revenue generated by marijuana sales will help public schools in the state. In August, Education Week reported that more than $1 million of pot revenue is being used to help schools fund construction projects . With the implementation of the law, the effect that marijuana legalization has on teenage drug use has been debated . ...
Also found in: [+]
What We Really Know About Psychedelic Mushrooms 14.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
For centuries, "magic" mushrooms have been both celebrated and reviled for their mind-expanding properties. Research and popular use of psychedelic drugs like mushrooms and LSD surged in the 1960s, when the substances first entered the American cultural consciousness on a large scale, and came to define '60s counterculture. At this time, thousands of studies were conducted to determine the properties and potential therapeutic applications of the drugs. But in 1970, the Controlled Substances Act brought an end to this era of science-based open-mindedness, and greatly limited drug research for the next four decades. Today, research on psychedelic drugs is experiencing a renaissance of sorts . A growing body of scientific studies from major universities and medical centers suggests that the substances may hold promise as therapeutic interventions for a number of mental health conditions. 'Shrooms are known to trigger hallucinations, feelings of euphoria, perceptual distortions, inability to distinguish ...
Also found in: [+]
Ending New York City's Low-Level Marijuana Arrests Doesn't Fix The Problem 11.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio's plan to arrest fewer people for marijuana possession drew cautious optimism from elected officials and advocates on Monday, but they said they feared black and Latino men will continue to be disproportionately affected by marijuana laws. De Blasio and NYPD Commissioner William Bratton Monday announced that starting Nov. 19, those found in public possession of less than 25 grams of marijuana will be issued a court summons instead of being arrested on a misdemeanor charge. “This new policy will reduce unnecessary arrests for minor marijuana possession and put an end to an era where many of young New Yorkers were being arrested and saddled with criminal records for minor violations,” de Blasio said in a statement. De Blasio said the change would direct police resources “towards more serious crime” and not waste “officer time processing unnecessary arrests.” There are, however, some caveats. Anyone caught with “burning” marijuana (smoking a joint) in public will still be ...
Also found in: [+]
Democrats Actually Gained Women's Support Since Last Midterm Election 7.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
After Republicans swept the midterm elections on Tuesday, conservatives triumphantly declared the death of Democrats' strategy to appeal to women voters , pointing to the fact that Democrats appear to have lost ground among women voters between 2012 and 2014. "The bottom has fallen out of the abortion-centered ‘war on women’ strategy," said Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the anti-abortion group Susan B. Anthony List. "Why is that? Women just don’t agree with the shrinking ranks of the feminist left like EMILY’s List and NARAL that unlimited abortion is the great liberator for women." But women's rights groups have come to the opposite conclusion. Democrats usually do not fare as well in midterm election years as they do in presidential election years due to a significant decrease in voter turnout among single women and young and minority voters. But comparing 2014 to the last midterm election in 2010 -- a more "apples to apples" comparison -- Democrats have actually gained 6 points with women ...
Also found in: [+]
Obama Pledges To Protect Health Care Law From Republican Assaults 6.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama vowed to protect the core elements of his health care reform law after Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) pledged to attack it anew next year, in light of big Republican gains in Tuesday’s midterm elections. Republicans will take control of the Senate in January, adding it to the majority they have had in the House since 2011 -- during which time they voted in more than 50 instances to kill Obamacare. The party's opposition to Obamacare is virtually unanimous. In remarks at a White House press conference Wednesday, Obama expressed openness to small changes to the Affordable Care Act, but pre-emptively rejected any Republican proposals that would undermine the law, which remade the health insurance market and has extended health coverage to millions of previously uninsured people . "On health care, there are certainly some lines I'm going to draw," Obama said. "Repeal of the law I won't sign. Efforts that would take away health care from the 10 million ...
Also found in: [+]
5 New GOP Governors Could Undercut Medicaid Expansion 6.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Republican wave at the polls Tuesday didn't just give the GOP more power to obstruct Obamacare in Congress and block Medicaid expansion in more than 20 states. It also could jeopardize health benefits already extended to Americans living near the poverty level. Republican governors will replace Democrats in four states -- Arkansas, Illinois, Maryland and Massachusetts -- that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. And the Republican succeeding Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer (R) is dubious about that state's expansion. Heading into Election Day, advocates for more Medicaid were hopeful that Democrats would win gubernatorial races in Florida, Maine, Wisconsin and other states where Republican governors have blocked the policy, leaving millions uninsured . Instead, the only place where the tide could turn in favor of Medicaid expansion, which the Supreme Court made optional for the states in 2012, is Alaska. The race there remains undecided between independent Bill Walker, who supports the ...
Also found in: [+]
Stigma and Big Pharma: Why Are States Denying People Who Use Illicit Drugs or Alcohol Life-saving Medical Treatment? 4.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Imagine learning that your terminal illness could be cured only to be told that you were going to denied access to the medication that could save you. This is precisely the situation facing thousands of people living with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Gilead, the maker of Sovaldi, a medication that has shown promise in treating HCV, has come under a lot of fire for the high cost of their product. A course of treatment with Sovaldi costs around $84,000 but is estimated to be up 90 percent effective in suppressing HCV , a notoriously hard-to-treat disease. Since HCV affects an estimated 3.2 million Americans , insurers -- both public and private -- are struggling with how to cover treatment costs. Some insurers have turned to rationing policies, including denying access to people who use illicit drugs or who have alcohol problems. Preliminary findings from researchers at Harvard and Brown analyzing states' Medicaid programs found 30 states have restricted access to Sovaldi for people with alcohol or ...
Also found in: [+]
California Raids Destroy Sick Kids' Medical Marijuana Supply 4.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A spate of recent raids in California has destroyed an abundance of medical marijuana plants intended to treat children with debilitating seizure disorders. Two weeks ago, a local narcotics task force raided a collective in the San Diego area, and similar agencies destroyed private farms farther north, in Mendocino and Modesto, in August. All the individuals targeted maintain they were operating within the confines of state law, and each was cultivating a supply that would be turned into medicine for children. "It's devastating," Joe, a Modesto-area resident whose 18-month-old son, Joey, suffers from a chronic condition that can lead to more than a hundred seizures per day, told The Huffington Post. "This has saved my son's life. Now what are we supposed to do?" Joe, who wouldn't give his full name for fear of further prosecution from the county, says Joey has been seizure-free since he began taking cannabis oil two months ago. His supplier, Steve Boski, had also been growing medical marijuana for HIV ...
Also found in: [+]
The Day After Tomorrow: What Congress Needs to Accomplish This Year 3.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Tomorrow, the election will be over, and while the next Congress is still two months away, we have a massive amount of work that remains for us before the end of the year. During this period, I will focus on issues that should be moved forward quickly, and which don't need to be partisan. Here at home, the mounting transportation infrastructure crisis in our country, with bridges and roads in severe disrepair and traffic congestion costing the average American family $1,700 a year, needs to be immediately addressed. Falling oil and gas prices represents a unique opportunity. We can raise the gas tax to keep up with inflation and meet the challenges of our failing infrastructure without increasing the financial burden on American motorists, who are enjoying a dramatic reduction in gasoline prices. Passing my legislation to raise the gas tax in the lame duck session would solve our problem, jump start the economy, and demonstrate our resolve to invest in our future. We can also improve Americans' lives by ...
Also found in: [+]
Seniors Could Be Key To Legal Medical Marijuana In Florida 2.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
PEMBROKE PINES, Fla. (AP) — The debate over legalizing medical marijuana in Florida constantly generates talk of young people potentially flooding the polls. But seniors are the most reliable voters and could be key to the outcome of the measure. Though polling on Amendment 2 has been erratic, seniors have been showing a level of interest in the initiative that underscores the fact they may benefit most from its passage. "You get older, you get sick, you start getting diseases, your bones stop working as well as they used to and you're presented with this pharmacopoeia of different drugs that you have to take just to get through the day," said Ben Pollara, who leads United for Care, the pro-Amendment 2 campaign. "To the extent that seniors can use marijuana to supplement or replace any of those drugs I think is a good thing." Similar arguments have been made by older people themselves, who have turned up at events across the state, even when they've been intended for more youthful crowds. Such was the ...
Also found in: [+]
War on Drugs Doesn't Decrease Use, UK Gov't Report Finds 31.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Also found in: [+]
Ballot Measure To Drug-Test Doctors Draws Backlash 30.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A proposal to randomly drug-test doctors in California is stealing the spotlight from the medical malpractice reform measure it was attached to, and drug-reform advocates have united against it. California residents will vote Tuesday on Proposition 46 , which originally centered on increasing the non-economic “pain and suffering” damages in medical negligence lawsuits from $250,000 -- the lowest in the country -- to $1.1 million. Its author, Bob Pack, whose young children were killed by a driver under the influence of prescription drugs nearly 11 years ago, struggled to find a lawyer to represent him in a lawsuit against the “doctor-shopping” driver because of low potential damages that would have limited attorney fees. According to KQED, Pack said when he began authoring the initiative, medical experts advised him to add a doctor drug-testing provision . Critics have called that addition an attempt to sweeten the appeal of a ballot measure about something else entirely. Under the proposition, doctors ...
Also found in: [+]
Mandatory Rehab Is Just the Newest Front in the War on Drugs 29.10.2014 Truthout - All Articles
The yard at the Albert M. "Bo" Robinson Assessment and Treatment Center in Trenton, New Jersey, March 13, 2012. The Bo Robinson center is run by a company with deep ties to Gov. Chris Christie that dominates New Jersey's system of large halfway houses, where there has been little state oversight, despite widespread problems. (Photo: Richard Perry / The New York Times) The past few months have seen a wide variety of political leaders extolling the virtues of drug treatment over incarceration. Major Republican figureheads are now on the bandwagon – perhaps none more voraciously than Chris Christie, who recently announced at a summit on addiction destigmatisation, “There but for the grace of God go I – that’s how I look at addiction.” He has also offered a solution: “When you give people the tools to save their own lives, that’s God’s miracles happening in their own lives.” The yard at the Albert M. "Bo" Robinson Assessment and Treatment Center in Trenton, New Jersey, March 13, 2012. The Bo Robinson center ...
Also found in: [+]
The Device That Could Help Keep Former Inmates Out Of Jail For Good 29.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
More than 100 inmates in San Francisco’s jail are now in possession of computer tablets as part of a two-year pilot program allowing them to study using the same technology as students’ outside the system, shedding light on the digital divide so many inmates experience when they re-enter the job force. The tablets were provided last week by Five Keys Charter School , a high school diploma program started by the San Francisco’s Sheriff’s Department in 2003 that has since spread to Los Angeles. Participating inmates will have the tablets for most of the day , NBC Bay Area reported, but they can be deactivated at any time and will only allow access to four secure websites, including a law library and education program. “Tablets are next logical step,” Wendy Still, San Francisco’s chief adult probation officer, told The Huffington Post. “So much of our lives is digital learning.” The $275,000 pilot program is funded by the California Wellness Foundation, the city’s Adult Probation Department and Five Keys ...
Also found in: [+]
Attack on Canadian Parliament Fuels "Anti-Terror" Laws, Ignoring Ties to Mental Illness, Drug Abuse 28.10.2014 Truthout.com
As Canada mourns the death of a soldier gunned down while standing guard at the National War Monument in Ottawa, Prime Minister Stephen Harper is pushing new antiterrorism legislation that would expand surveillance and intelligence sharing with foreign governments. In the days since the shooting, the gunman, Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, has been identified as a convert to Islam with a history of drug abuse, criminal activity and mental illness. The incident came two days after another violent attack on Canadian troops in Quebec. Martin Couture-Rouleau, also identified as a "radicalized" Muslim convert, drove a car into two soldiers, killing one of them. The incidents have sparked fears of blowback shortly after Canada joined the U.S.-led war against Islamic State militants in Iraq. But the violence has also raised questions about Canada’s treatment of the mentally ill and others on the margins. Zehaf-Bibeau had been dealing with a serious crack-cocaine addiction and living in and out of homeless shelters. On ...
Also found in: [+]
Toronto Elects John Tory As Mayor, Ending Rob Ford Era 28.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
ROB GILLIES, Associated Press TORONTO (AP) — Toronto has elected a moderate conservative as mayor, ending the scandal-ridden Rob Ford era. John Tory had 40 percent of the vote, compared to 34 percent for Doug Ford, brother of outgoing Mayor Rob Ford. Left-leaning Olivia Chow was third with nearly 23 percent. The results were announced Monday night with more than 90 percent of polling stations reporting. Rob Ford's four-year tenure as mayor of Canada's largest city was marred by his drinking and crack cocaine use. He announced last month that he wouldn't seek re-election as he battles a rare form of cancer. His brother, a city councilor, ran in his place. Despite the cancer, Ford opted to seek the City Council seat from the Etobicoke district where he launched his political career. He won his old seat in a landslide. After months of denials, the mayor in 2013 acknowledged he had smoked crack cocaine in one of his "drunken stupors," but he refused to resign. The City Council stripped Ford of most of his ...
Also found in: [+]
Nations Devastated By Ebola Were Already Under Siege In The Global Drug War 24.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
West Africa’s public infrastructure is now collapsing under the burden of the Ebola outbreak. But the health and political systems in that region were already under attack from another deadly force -- drug trafficking and the harsh criminal response so frequently wielded in the global war on drugs. What makes it so hard to combat the spread of Ebola in West Africa -- weak public infrastructure, porous borders and high poverty rates -- are some of the same factors that drew the narco-traffickers. And the impulse to focus on law enforcement over medical treatment in these crises can be equally ineffective and ultimately fatal to many. Consider the latest calls to ban travel to the United States from West Africa. They've been resisted by top public health officials , who warn that combating the epidemic requires full knowledge of where people have been and with whom they've been traveling. "Even when governments restrict travel and trade, people in affected countries still find a way to move and it is even ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 726