User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Dec 02 2016 01:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Do speed bumps kill? 1.12.2016 TreeHugger
Starting and stopping means pollution. But if they are designed right, you can go right over them.
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Psychedelic Mushrooms Ease Existential Anxiety In Cancer Patients 1.12.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Dinah Bazer, a 69-year-old mother and retired information systems worker living in Brooklyn, credits psychedelics with saving her life. After undergoing chemotherapy for late-stage ovarian cancer in 2010, Bazer was consumed with anxiety and constant feelings of dread and hopelessness. So when her nurse told her about a clinical trial testing a new drug for cancer-related anxiety and depression ― high-dose psilocybin, the active ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms ― she signed up without hesitating.  Not long after ingesting the psilocybin during her session, Bazer found herself engulfed in utter terror. She visualized her fear as a black mass under her rib cage and yelled for it to “get the fuck out!” Almost immediately, the fear left her completely. She shifted into a spiritual experience she described as bathing in God’s unconditional love for several hours.  Four years later, the experience is still with her and the fear is still gone. Bazer says she became calmer, let go of her aggressive driving ...
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Congress Is About To Pass A Bill That Shows D.C. At Its Worst -- It May Also Fix The Opioid Crisis And Cure Cancer 30.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― In 1996, Purdue Pharma introduced a new painkiller it said carried a low risk of abuse or addiction. It called the drug “OxyContin.” In reality, of course, OxyContin was extremely addictive — and Purdue knew it. A decade later, three Purdue executives, and the company itself, pleaded guilty to criminal charges tied to OxyContin’s marketing and agreed to pay more than $600 million in fines. But the executives dodged prison time, and the prosecution did little to slow the rise of opioid use. The pharmaceutical industry had spent the past 10 years and billions of dollars pushing the medical community to ramp up the use of OxyContin and other opioids. By 2013, the number of annual opioid prescriptions , including short term and multiple, had nearly tripled, topping 200 million — in a country of just over 300 million people. Use of OxyContin and other opioids grew to crisis levels. As federal and state governments cracked down on doctors who dispensed pills and prescriptions indiscriminately, ...
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Overdose deaths a public health crisis and no government has the solution 25.11.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
At the entrance were three photograph collages of those who have fallen to fatal overdoses, many of them youthful and vibrant British Columbians. It is intended to be a reminder that this scourge isn't something confined to the back alleys of the Downtown Eastside. One B.C. presentation showed a photo of a smiling young couple from North Vancouver with their ...
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The Real Trump Effect: Down-Ballot Disaster for Democrats 10.11.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the University Co-op on Election Day in Austin, Texas, November 8, 2016. (Photo: Tamir Kalifa / The New York Times) Democrats sustained losses at every level of government due to the high turnout of Trump voters. But hidden in the rubble are a few significant down-ballot victories: the beating back of efforts to undermine public schools in Massachusetts, voting reform in Maine, marijuana legalization in several states and the defeat of xenophobic Sheriff Arpaio in Arizona. Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the University Co-op on Election Day in Austin, Texas, November 8, 2016. (Photo: Tamir Kalifa / The New York Times) Heading into the 2016 Election, Democratic Party strategists, pollsters and political scientists discussed the "Trump Effect." The theory, it was widely believed, was that Trump would get crushed so badly that his presence at the top of the ticket would be a boon for Democrats down the ticket, helping them win back the Senate and ...
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The Good News: California, 7 Other States Vote Yes On Marijuana 10.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In a resounding mandate for progressive marijuana reform, California and seven other states voted Tuesday in favor of initiatives allowing for some form of legalized cannabis. In California, considered by experts to be the key nationally, 56 percent voted in support of full adult recreational legalization. Voters in Massachusetts and Nevada also said yes to legalized, regulated cannabis. Medical marijuana initiatives passed in Florida, Arkansas and North Dakota. The vote for full legalization is too close to call in Maine and an initiative to improve an existing medical marijuana program in Montana was too close to call. Arizona so far is the only state that had marijuana on the ballot to vote against. California joins Oregon and Washington on the West Coast with legal weed, creating a new Green Corridor. "This vote will dramatically accelerate the end of federal marijuana prohibition," said Tom Angell, chairman of Marijuana Majority, a drug policy reform organization. "This is the most important moment ...
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Who's Spending to Defeat Progressive Ballot Measures Today? 8.11.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Ballot initiatives across the country today are aiming to legalize marijuana, create a statewide single-payer health care system and raise the minimum wage. Seventy-one of those measures were started by citizens. But the initiatives face significant financial obstacles. (Image: JR / TO ; Adapted: Kyle Johnston / Flickr ) According to Ballotpedia , 162 statewide ballot initiatives from 35 states will be decided on today, with 71 of those measures started by grassroots activists via signature petitions. Measures across the country are aiming to legalize marijuana, create a statewide single-payer health care system and raise the minimum wage. But these initiatives face significant financial obstacles. Who's trying to block these bottom-up democratic measures? California, Arizona, Nevada, Maine and Massachusetts are voting on ballot initiatives that would legalize the use of recreational marijuana today. If California votes to legalize recreational use, as polls suggest, the measure is expected to grow the ...
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9 States to Vote on Marijuana Initiatives: Will They Stop Jailing Young People of Color over Weed? 2.11.2016 Democracy Now!
On November 8, 35 states and the District of Columbia will confront 156 ballot initiatives on issues ranging from universal healthcare to gun sale restrictions and death penalty reforms. One of the most contentious ballot initiatives concerns marijuana legalization. After next week's election, marijuana could be legal for medical or recreational use in 29 states. Currently about 5 percent of Americans live in states where they can legally smoke cannabis, but after November that figure could rise to 25 percent. California is the biggest of the nine states casting a ballot on the measure. While other states are voting on medicinal use, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada are with California in voting on legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. The "yes" vote is currently leading in all five states and is widely supported by young voters from both major parties. California legalized the medical use of marijuana 20 years ago. Polls in California show strong support for Proposition 64, the Adult Use ...
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Colorado Lawmakers Want Arizona's Anti-Marijuana Campaign To Stop Misleading People About Their State 1.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Lawmakers in Colorado on Monday asked an anti-marijuana campaign in Arizona to stop airing ads that they say contain false information about their state and could mislead voters who will be deciding on recreational legalization of the drug next week.  State Sen. Pat Steadman (D) and Democratic state Reps. Millie Hamner and Johnathan Singer wrote an email to Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy leaders to call out ads the group has run. They say the TV spots contain “inaccurate and misleading statements” about the use of legal marijuana tax revenue in Colorado as well as rates of teen drug use. “As members of the Colorado Legislature who played a central role in the budgeting and appropriation of marijuana tax revenues, we feel it is our duty to set the record straight so that voters in both [Arizona and Colorado] have accurate information about this subject,” the letter reads.  In an ad titled “ Empty Promises ,” two former Colorado school officials suggest that millions of dollars in tax revenue that ...
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Landlords and tenants to fight out right to grow medical marijuana under new regulations 27.10.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, October 27, 2016 The new Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation (ACMPR), which came into force on August 24, 2016, has changed how patients with prescriptions for medical marijuana can get their medicine. The ACMPR came to be, in part, as a response to a Federal Court ruling that the former Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR) violated the Charter because it prohibited personal production of medical cannabis. For many medicinal cannabis users, the cost of accessing through the channels allowed under the MMPR were simply unaffordable. While new regulations governing the growth of medical marijuana provide a quick solution for the issue of reasonable access, they leave the tough questions for tenants and housing ...
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Voting Yes For Medical Or Recreational Marijuana Legalization Will Probably Save Lives: Your Vote Matters 26.10.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This year's election is already underway and while most of us are paying attention to the presidential candidates, there are a lot of other elected positions and ballot measures that are important to consider. One issue, being voted on in nine states, regards varying levels of marijuana legalization, either for medical or recreational use. As an addiction treatment professional who closely follows healthcare issues, I urge you to consider a yes vote if your state has a marijuana legalization measure on the ballot. Doing so probably will save lives that would otherwise be lost to opioid abuse and addiction. Is the legalization of medical or recreational marijuana a solution for America's opioid epidemic? It certainly isn't the be all, end all, but there is a clear connection between decreased opioid overdose death rates and medical marijuana legalization. Although there is little research on medical marijuana's efficacy done in the United States , because it is a Schedule 1 drug, there is growing evidence ...
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Why the Opioid Crisis is an issue of Homeland Security 25.10.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
While the final presidential debate brought up discussions around protecting our borders and deporting drug traffickers, Chris Wallace (and every other debate moderator this election cycle) never asked about how our presidential candidates will address the very real public health crisis stemming from opioid and heroin abuse. Every day , the epidemic is killing 78 Americans and it is creating enormous risk for our next commander in chief who will be in charge of handling this crisis. So, why is a security expert like me concerned about drug abuse? Our homeland defenses are focused on risk planning - terrorism is a threat, but so are hurricanes and tornados, oil spills and border controls, and public health risks like Zika and, clearly, synthetic drugs. Our nation's security is about calculating risks to all-hazards and supporting those who are trained to protect our citizens. Simply put, the drug epidemic is challenging our overall response capacity and we haven't closed the gaps in our postal system that ...
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Duterte Deploys Questionable Data To Justify The Philippines' Drug War 24.10.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
MANILA, Oct 24 (Reuters) - Philippines’ President Rodrigo Duterte ended a recent speech in Manila with a now-familiar claim: Two policemen were dying every day in his violent battle to rid the country of illegal drugs. But police statistics have shown that figure to be exaggerated. From July 1, when Duterte launched his “war on drugs,” to Oct. 12, when he spoke in Manila, 13 police officers were killed. That’s an average of one every eight days. This is not the only dubious claim Duterte has used to justify his bloody anti-narcotics campaign, according to a Reuters review of official government data and interviews with the president’s top anti-drug officials. These officials say that data on the total number of drug users, the number of users needing treatment, the types of drugs being consumed and the prevalence of drug-related crime is exaggerated, flawed or non-existent. But they say the problematic statistics don’t matter because the campaign has focused attention on a long-neglected crisis in the ...
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ACLU and HRW Call to Decriminalize Drug Use and Possession After Documenting Arrests Every 25 Seconds 14.10.2016 Truthout - All Articles
A new report on the devastating harm of policies that criminalize the personal use and possession of drugs finds that in 2015 police booked more people for small-time marijuana charges than for murder, non-negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery and aggravated assault combined. The report also showed African-American adults are more than two-and-a-half times as likely as white adults to be arrested for drug possession despite comparable rates of drug usage. This comes as four states have legalized recreational marijuana use and five more will vote to do the same next month. Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union released the findings Wednesday with a call for states and the federal government to decriminalize low-level drug offenses. We speak with Tess Borden, author of the report "Every 25 Seconds: The Human Toll of Criminalizing Drug Use in the United States." TRANSCRIPT JUAN GONZÁLEZ: We turn now to a new  report  that documents the "devastating harm" of policies that criminalize the ...
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ACLU & HRW Call to Decriminalize Drug Use & Possession After Documenting Arrests Every 25 Seconds 14.10.2016 Democracy Now!
A new report on the devastating harm of policies that criminalize the personal use and possession of drugs finds that in 2015 police booked more people for small-time marijuana charges than for murder, non-negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery and aggravated assault combined. The report also showed African-American adults are more than two-and-a-half times as likely as white adults to be arrested for drug possession despite comparable rates of drug usage. This comes as four states have legalized recreational marijuana use and five more will vote to do the same next month. Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union released the findings Wednesday with a call for states and the federal government to decriminalize low-level drug offenses. We speak with Tess Borden, author of the report "Every 25 Seconds: The Human Toll of Criminalizing Drug Use in the United States."
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New Report: Disastrous Toll of Drug Use Criminalization 12.10.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

The massive enforcement of laws criminalizing personal drug use and possession in the United States causes devastating harm, Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said in a joint report released today. Enforcement ruins individual and family lives, discriminates against people of color, and undermines public health. The federal and state governments should decriminalize the personal use and possession of illicit drugs.

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Marijuana May Alleviate America’s Opioid Crisis, New Study Suggests 18.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Access to medical marijuana may be cutting down on the overall use of opioids, including prescription painkillers like OxyContin and Percocet, new research suggests.  In a study, researchers from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health  analyzed traffic fatality data from 1999-2013 for 18 U.S states. They found that most states that passed medical marijuana laws saw an overall reduction in fatal crashes involving drivers who tested positive for opioids. “We would expect the adverse consequences of opioid use to decrease over time in states where medical marijuana use is legal, as individuals substitute marijuana for opioids in the treatment of severe or chronic pain,” lead author June H. Kim, a doctoral student at Mailman, said in a statement. The study, published Thursday in the  American Journal of Public Health , is among the first to look at the link between state medical marijuana laws and opioid use. Medical marijuana laws, the authors concluded, are “ associated with reductions in ...
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Confirming Big Pharma Fears, Study Suggests Medical Marijuana Laws Decrease Opioid Use 16.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

It is of little wonder that Big Pharma has been exposed actively undermining efforts to legalize marijuana, after new research on Thursday found a drop in the use of opioid painkillers in that states that allow people to treat pain with good, ol' Mary Jane.

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The DEA Didn't Talk To Kratom Users Before Pushing A Ban. Here's What They Would've Said. 16.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
“Oxycontin, morphine, fentanyl, Darvocet.” Deanna McNair, 36, pauses before ticking off the rest of the drugs she’s been prescribed for pain following a series of car accidents and subsequent surgeries. “Percocet, Opana, Norco, methadone,” she continues. “Not all at the same time, of course.” Then there are the muscle relaxers, antidepressants and medications McNair had to take just to treat the side effects of her other prescriptions. The panoply of pharmaceuticals was a necessity for McNair. Over a period of 13 years, she underwent five lumbar surgeries and one cervical surgery. Three vertebrae in her lower back are now fused, as is one in her neck. “The drugs helped with the pain, but not with getting back to life,” McNair said. “They make you loopy, they make you tired, they make you nod out when you’re taking them.” The prescription regimen left McNair unable to drive. She could no longer focus in class, so she put her education on hold. Despite being dependent on opioids for pain relief, McNair ...
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Seriously 'Sinister' Big Pharma: Opioid Maker Bankrolls Opposition to Pro-Pot Referendum 10.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

It has been revealed that the maker of a powerful, addictive opioid drug is bankrolling the opposition to the effort to legalize and regulate marijuana for recreational use in Arizona.

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