User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Apr 13 2018 21:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Medicaid Is Helping to Combat the Opioid Crisis, Despite Trump's Attacks 13.4.2018 Truthout.com
According to a new report, Medicaid is paying for more addiction treatment than private insurers, and recipients living with opioid disorders are twice as likely to obtain treatment. Medicaid is having an impact despite President Trump's efforts to undermine public benefits, and health experts say Trump's own plan for combating the opioid crisis would do more harm than good. (Photo: FS Productions / Getty Images) This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. About 1.9 million nonelderly adults in the United States are believed to be living with opioid addiction, and those with Medicaid were twice as likely as those with private insurance or no health insurance to receive treatment for the disease in 2016,  according to a new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation . The analysis raises serious questions for the Trump administration, which has declared the opioid crisis a major ...
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The Misplaced Attacks on Legal Cannabis Continue 20.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Cannabis legalization advocates have long speculated that the crackdown on pot is merely an attempt to squelch any competition with the fabricated THC/CBD drugs that Big Pharma wants to market. A case in point is the Schedule II classification granted to Dronabinol made by opioid manufacturer Insys Therapeutics, which spent half a million dollars to defeat a marijuana legalization measure in Arizona. Cannabis plants grow in the greenhouse at Vireo Health's medical marijuana cultivation facility, August 19, 2016, in Johnstown, New York. (Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images) Support from readers provides Truthout with vital funds to keep investigating what mainstream media won't cover. Fund more stories like this by donating now! Sadly, but not surprisingly, a New York federal district court judge dismissed a lawsuit  at the end of February against Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Drug Enforcement Administration  (DEA) that challenges the federal government's ...
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Illinois emergency rooms see 66 percent spike in opioid overdose visits: report 6.3.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
Illinois emergency rooms experienced a 66 percent jump in opioid overdose visits last year, according to a new report that suggests the epidemic of heroin and prescription painkiller abuse is worsening in some states. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released state ...
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A Marijuana-Related Charge Can Still Impact Somebody for Life 24.1.2018 Truthout.com
Janine Jackson: Several states and the District of Columbia have now legalized marijuana for recreational use, as long as certain rules are followed, like keeping it away from minors, and keeping revenue away from criminal enterprises. Still more states allow for medical marijuana. But pot is still illegal under federal law, classified a Schedule 1 drug, like heroin.  Many assumed -- smelling the wind, if you will -- that these tensions would be overridden as more states legalize, and as public approval, already around 60 percent, increases, probably resulting in national legalization. A profitable industry is growing with just that expectation, particularly as states that have legalized aren't reporting negative impacts in public health or crime.  But Attorney General Jeff Sessions' stance is reflected in his  declaration , "Good people don't smoke marijuana." His recent move, rescinding Obama-era guidance that had federal prosecutors take a laissez-faire approach to states, should probably be ...
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Recriminalizing Cannabis Is Worse Than 1930s "Reefer Madness" 19.1.2018 Truthout.com
In these troubling and surreal times, honest journalism is more important than ever. Help us keep real news flowing: Make a donation to Truthout today. In the 1930s, parents across the US were panicked. A new documentary, "Reefer Madness," suggested that evil marijuana dealers lurked in public schools, waiting to entice their children into a life of crime and degeneracy.  The documentary captured the essence of the anti-marijuana campaign started by Harry Anslinger, a government employee eager to make a name for himself after Prohibition ended. Ansligner's campaign demonized marijuana as  a dangerous drug , playing on the racist attitudes of white Americans in the early 20th century and stoking fears of marijuana as an "assassin of youth."  Over the decades, there's been a general trend toward greater social acceptance of marijuana by a more educated society, seeing the  harm caused  by the prohibition of marijuana. But then, on Jan. 4, Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded  an Obama-era memorandum ...
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Sessions Doubles Down in the War on Weed 16.1.2018 Truthout.com
Far more people read Truthout than will ever donate -- but we rely on donations to keep our publication running strong. Support independent journalism by making a contribution now! Four days after California rang in the New Year as the sixth state to legalize recreational use of marijuana -- and more than 21 years after it became the first state to legalize medical marijuana use -- Attorney General Jeff Sessions declared war on the most populous state. Sessions issued  a Marijuana Enforcement Memo  providing guidance to US Attorneys on "which marijuana activities to prosecute" by following "well-established principles" to "disrupt criminal organizations, tackle the growing drug crisis, and thwart violent crime across our country." The Trump administration's Pot Memo doesn't immediately affect medical marijuana usage -- now available in 29 states, plus the District of Columbia -- but it does roll back  the 2014 Cole Memorandum , which guided federal prosecutors away from targeting marijuana businesses ...
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Marijuana Farms Expose Spotted Owls to Rat Poison in Northwest California 12.1.2018 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Wildlife species are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, with the California Academy of Sciences.
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Dying From Despair, but No Help From Trump 10.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
America is in the throes of a deep and pervasive social crisis -- and it's killing people at an alarming rate. That's the takeaway from the announcement in December that, for a second year in a row, average life expectancy in the US has declined. According to the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans can now expect to live 78.6 years on average -- a decline of 0.1 year for 2016 over the figures from 2015, which also represented a drop. That might not sound like a lot, but any decrease in life expectancy is a rare occurrence in a developed nation. In this case, it's the direct result of the opioid crisis that continues to ravage large swathes of the country. To put it in perspective, the last time there was a decline in life expectancy in the US was in 1993 at the height of the AIDS crisis -- and the last time there were two years of decline was 1962-63 as a result of a major flu epidemic. Worse, 2017 is on track to produce yet another decline ...
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US health agency to crack down on risky stem cell offerings 17.11.2017 Science / Technology News

U.S. health authorities say they will crack down on doctors pushing stem cell therapies that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that has received little oversight. The Food and Drug Administration laid out its plan Thursday for regulating cell-based medicine, including hundreds of private clinics that have opened across the nation in the last decade.

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By Treating Overdoses Like Murder, Prosecutors Are Making the Opioid Crisis Deadlier 8.11.2017 Truthout.com
The push for murder charges against people who share drugs or sell small amounts of opioids to support their own addictions is only driving vulnerable people further into the shadows of a deadly crisis, advocates say. The resources spent on these prosecutions would be better spent on treatment and harm reduction efforts. Activists attend a protest denouncing the city's "inadequate and wrongheaded response" to the overdose crisis, outside of the NYPD headquarters, August 10, 2017, in New York City. (Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images) Peter Bruun and his family were not going to let another young life be destroyed. In 2014, Bruun's 24-year-old daughter Elisif contacted her friend Sean Harrington while she was receiving treatment for heroin addiction at a mental wellness facility in North Carolina. She asked Harrington, who struggled with the same addiction and was living houseless in Philadelphia at the time, to send her heroin in the mail. Harrington agreed. Elisif overdosed and died at the treatment ...
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Trump's Plan for a "Drug-Free Society" Won't Fix the Opioid Problem, Experts Say 27.10.2017 Truthout.com
President Trump declared opioid addiction and overdoses a public health emergency on Thursday in an address steeped in drug war rhetoric, but experts on the front lines of the crisis say new White House directives do not go far enough to expand access to crucial health care services. Meanwhile, the GOP's own budget-cutting agenda may be undermining efforts to respond to opioids.  Donald Trump greets a guest during an event highlighting the opioid crisis in the US October 26, 2017, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) Want to see more coverage of the issues that matter? Make a donation to Truthout to ensure that we can publish more original stories like this one. President Donald Trump declared opioid addiction and overdoses a public health emergency on Thursday. Is this announcement a victory for public health? Trump is directing federal health officials to remove a few regulations that create barriers to addiction treatment. However, experts on the ...
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The Feds Spent Millions Seizing 5 Million Marijuana Plants in 2016, Did Not Solve Any Drug Problems 18.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Rainer Vandalismus ) Even as he talks about declaring the opioid crisis a national emergency, Trump is actively seeking to cut Medicaid and undermine the Affordable Care Act, which extended access to addiction treatment for millions. It's time Congress acted to push government toward public health solutions for the US's drug problems rather than pouring money into failed law enforcement policies. Want to see more coverage of the issues that matter? Make a donation to Truthout to ensure that we can publish more original stories like this one. Last year, the Drug Enforcement Agency's marijuana eradication program confiscated 5.3 million marijuana plants in operations nationwide, a 20 percent increase from the year before and by far the heaviest haul since President Obama's first term in office. The DEA pulled 3.5 million plants in California, more than any other state by a long shot, even as Californians voted to legalize cannabis for recreational use. The DEA still spends millions of dollars every ...
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Top Mental Health Researcher Suggests Link Between Opioid Overdoses and Suicides 5.10.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, believes more work must be done on connections between suicidal thoughts and overdoses.
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Consumer Product Safety Commission Cracks Down on Flame Retardants Linked to Health Problems 4.10.2017 Truthout.com
The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the independent federal commission charged with product safety, voted on September 20, 2017 to take steps toward protecting consumers and firefighters from the hazards posed by the  organohalogen  class of  flame retardants . "The vote is a rare victory for health groups and a rare setback for industry groups during the first months of President  Donald Trump 's administration," writes the  Chicago Tribune . CPSC Moves to Protect Consumers and Fire Fighters The organohalogen class of flame retardants has been shown to leach from the products, or "migrate widely," resulting in human exposure. This class of chemicals have been found in the bodies of  97% of Americans  says the Center for Disease Control. They have been  linked  to cancer, neurological deficits, hormone disruption and other health problems. Just last month,  a study by the Harvard Chan School of Public Health  found that flame retardants reduced the likelihood of clinical pregnancy and live ...
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Federal Requests For Patient Info Raise Red Flags In States That Allow Medical Pot Use 13.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"With the anti-marijuana rhetoric coming from the Trump administration’s Department of Justice, you do have to wonder what the true motivation is here.”
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Sexism, Racism and Classism Are Fueling the Opioid Crisis 10.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Tori Herr dreamed of becoming a veterinarian or a journalist. She was only 18 years old when she died in a Pennsylvania jail. After Tori was arrested on drug charges in 2015, she began suffering from heroin withdrawal in jail. She was denied medical treatment, and her cellmate was threatened with punishment for attempting CPR when Tori collapsed. By the time medical staff arrived, Tori hadn't been breathing for 10 minutes. "I would've loved to see what her future would've been," Tori's mother, Stephanie Moyer, told the local news . But as Moyer points out, Tori was "sentenced to death before she even saw the judge." Tori's death was not an isolated incident. More and more women are dying from causes related to opioid use, and the state's response has been criminalization, not care. In 2015, 418 women in Tori's home state of Pennsylvania died from opioid overdoses, a marked rise from previous years. This increase mirrors a rise in overdose deaths among women across the nation. Although men still use ...
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Why You Think Weed Is Bad (And Why You're Wrong) 6.9.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marijuana does not have to get you high in order to help your health
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When All the World's a War -- And All the Men and Women Merely Soldiers 15.8.2017 Truthout.com
When we declare war on phenomena like crime, drugs, or terror, instantly militarizing such problems, we severely limit our means for understanding and dealing with them. (Photo: Pixabay ) Since September 11, 2001, the United States has been fighting a "war on terror." Real soldiers have been deployed to distant lands; real cluster bombs and white phosphorus have been used; real cruise missiles have been launched; the first  MOAB , the largest non-nuclear bomb in the US arsenal, has been dropped; and real cities have been  reduced to rubble . In revenge for the deaths of  2,977 civilians  that day, real people --  in the millions  -- have died and millions more have  become refugees . But is the war on terror actually a war at all -- or is it only a metaphor? In a real war, nations or organized non-state actors square off against each other. A metaphorical war is like a real war -- after all, that's what a metaphor is, a way of saying that one thing is like something else -- but the enemy isn't a country ...
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Marijuana use may up death risk of from hypertension 15.8.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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Marijuana ups risk of death from hypertension 10.8.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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