User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Infectious Disease
Last updated: Mar 31 2018 22:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Imprisoned for Offering Oral Sex: Ill-Founded Laws Criminalize People With HIV 31.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Laws remain on the books in more than 30 states making the possible transmission of HIV a criminal act. (Photo: scottmontreal / Flickr ) Despite enormous scientific and medical advances in the treatment of HIV, stigma around the virus continues to persist. Discrimination against those living with HIV remains pervasive in employment, housing and medical care. And in over 30 states, people with HIV are criminalized to the extent that even the possibility of HIV transmission is punishable by fines and incarceration. Laws remain on the books in more than 30 states making the possible transmission of HIV a criminal act. (Photo: scottmontreal / Flickr ) Support from readers provides Truthout with vital funds to keep investigating what mainstream media won't cover. Fund more stories like this by donating now! Eighteen months ago, in September 2017, the  Centers for Disease Control (CDC) finally recognized reality , posting on their website that "suppressing HIV through antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevents ...
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Crowded Shelters and the Vicious Flu Brew Perfect Storm for the Homeless 13.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout refuses corporate funding and all the strings that come attached. Instead, reader support powers us. Make a tax-deductible donation today! The flu descended on Connie Gabaldon like a fog, she recalled, clouding her mind and compromising her judgment. It progressed to chest and back pain, the aches perhaps made worse by a fall the 66-year-old had while riding the bus in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Gabaldon is homeless. When she went to the emergency room in late January, doctors told her she also had pneumonia, a sinus infection and the flu. For the general population, the flu represents a serious health concern. But for the homeless -- who deal with higher rates of chronic illness, fewer resources and crowded conditions in shelters -- catching the flu can be a matter of life or death. This year, the nation has experienced a vicious flu season on track to break recent records, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although the outbreak has shown signs of decline over the past two ...
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Fighting the flu? This technology tries to help you get well faster 19.2.2018 Science / Technology News

As one of the worst influenza outbreaks on record sweeps across America, that's a question hundreds of scientists, inventors, and health officials are working hard to answer. For a start, flu experts recommend getting a vaccine, which reduces the chance of getting the flu by about one-third, though it's just 25% effective against the worst strain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .

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As Deadly Flu Sweeps Country, Koch-Backed Group Fights Paid Sick Leave Policies Nationwide 13.2.2018 Truthout.com
This week marks 25 years since Bill Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act, which gave employees in the US the right to unpaid time off to care for themselves and family members. A decade later, San Francisco became the first city to approve paid sick leave. Today some 14 million workers in 32 municipalities and nine states have paid sick leave policies. On Thursday, Austin city councilmembers will vote on an ordinance that would make it the first city in the South to require paid sick leave from private employers. But the measure is facing strong opposition from a Koch brothers-backed lobbying group called the National Federation of Independent Business, which is fighting paid sick leave policies across the country. This the same lobbying group that led the opposition to the Affordable Care Act. For more we speak to Gregorio Casar, the Austin city councilmember who introduced the paid sick leave measure. When he first won election in 2014, he was the youngest councilmember in the city's ...
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Study shows flu may be spread just by breathing 22.1.2018 TreeHugger
New research suggests that it is easier to spread the influenza virus than previously thought.
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Flu Vaccine Spinout Secures a Further £20m in Funding 15.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Vaccitech, an Oxford University spinout company developing a universal flu vaccine, among other vaccine-related products, has secured £20 million in Series A financing. 
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Dying From Despair, but No Help From Trump 10.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
America is in the throes of a deep and pervasive social crisis -- and it's killing people at an alarming rate. That's the takeaway from the announcement in December that, for a second year in a row, average life expectancy in the US has declined. According to the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans can now expect to live 78.6 years on average -- a decline of 0.1 year for 2016 over the figures from 2015, which also represented a drop. That might not sound like a lot, but any decrease in life expectancy is a rare occurrence in a developed nation. In this case, it's the direct result of the opioid crisis that continues to ravage large swathes of the country. To put it in perspective, the last time there was a decline in life expectancy in the US was in 1993 at the height of the AIDS crisis -- and the last time there were two years of decline was 1962-63 as a result of a major flu epidemic. Worse, 2017 is on track to produce yet another decline ...
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How Well Will The Flu Vaccine Work This Winter? 14.12.2017 Environmental News Network
The most effective way of preventing seasonal influenza is to be vaccinated each autumn. The reason that people are encouraged to get vaccinated annually is because flu virus can cause severe disease. One of the problems is that there are many different flu viruses circulating around the world and which ones circulate changes over time.
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Avian Flu From Abroad Can Spread in North American Poultry, Wild Birds 6.12.2017 Global Health and Wellness News - ENN
Some avian influenza, or bird flu, viruses that are able to enter North America from other continents through migrating birds can be deadly to poultry and can infect waterfowl populations, according to a recently published U.S. Geological Survey study.
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Global Risk of Madagascar's Pneumonic Plague Epidemic is Limited 30.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Mathematical models have proven the risk of the on-going pneumonic plague epidemic in Madagascar spreading elsewhere in the world is limited, with the estimated number of exported cases staying below 0.1 person in each country between August 1 and October 17.
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In Pursuit of a Universal Flu Vaccine 3.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Flu shot season is here. But as you head to the doctor’s office or pharmacy to get vaccinated, scientists are working to make this yearly ritual a thing of the past. Researchers around the world, including at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), are pursuing a “universal” flu vaccine, one that would protect against most or all seasonal and pandemic strains of the flu virus.
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World-First Trial for Universal Flu Vaccine 3.10.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The world’s first widespread human testing of a flu vaccine which researchers hope will protect more over 65-year-olds against influenza has begun in the NHS.
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Protein that may treat flu symptoms, cut death risk identified 1.10.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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A 'Glimmer Of Hope' In The Fight Against The World's Top Infectious Killer 27.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The global political will to fight tuberculosis is snowballing.
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HIV rates on rise among over 50s in Europe: Study 27.9.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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It Shouldn't Take a Hurricane to Gain Health Care Access: Nurses Report Back From Disaster Zones 26.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Two members of a rapid response network that deploys nurses to disaster zones report back from Houston, where they spent a week healing victims of Hurricane Harvey. Working at the intersection of activism and health care access, they say our health care is a human right that should be guaranteed by Medicare for All.  Group from Harvey Deployment (Rhonda is center). (Photo courtesy of National Nurses United) We're now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators not only about how to resist but also about how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 76th in the series. Click here for the most recent interview before this one. Today we bring you a conversation with Dotty Nygard and Rhonda Risner, two registered nurses, ...
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Smoking and HIV may cause lung cancer says a study 19.9.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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Smokers with HIV more at risk of lung cancer than AIDS 19.9.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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HIV Crime Laws: Historical Relics Or Public Safety Measures? 6.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Thirty-three states have laws that can be used to prosecute people living with HIV. Some states are looking to either repeal
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When All the World's a War -- And All the Men and Women Merely Soldiers 15.8.2017 Truthout.com
When we declare war on phenomena like crime, drugs, or terror, instantly militarizing such problems, we severely limit our means for understanding and dealing with them. (Photo: Pixabay ) Since September 11, 2001, the United States has been fighting a "war on terror." Real soldiers have been deployed to distant lands; real cluster bombs and white phosphorus have been used; real cruise missiles have been launched; the first  MOAB , the largest non-nuclear bomb in the US arsenal, has been dropped; and real cities have been  reduced to rubble . In revenge for the deaths of  2,977 civilians  that day, real people --  in the millions  -- have died and millions more have  become refugees . But is the war on terror actually a war at all -- or is it only a metaphor? In a real war, nations or organized non-state actors square off against each other. A metaphorical war is like a real war -- after all, that's what a metaphor is, a way of saying that one thing is like something else -- but the enemy isn't a country ...
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