User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Radiation
Last updated: Nov 25 2019 23:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Poor oversight comes back to haunt us 25.11.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Two investigations reveal federal agencies are too lax on bad actors.
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Feds give Navajo uranium clean-up contract to firm with sketchy past 17.10.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A High Country News investigation finds the EPA awarded Tetra Tech a contract despite knowing its subsidiary had likely engaged in data manipulation and falsification, false reporting and profiteering.
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While ‘zombie’ mines idle, cleanup and workers suffer in limbo 4.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Instead of paying to clean up the mess left by mining, companies are warehousing their operations indefinitely.
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Is nuclear energy the key to saving the planet? 10.12.2018 Current Issue
A new generation of environmentalists is learning to stop worrying and love atomic power.
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Before the US Approves New Uranium Mining, Consider Its Toxic Legacy 28.2.2018 Truthout.com
Support from readers keeps Truthout 100 percent independent. If you like what you're reading, make a donation! Uranium -- the raw material for nuclear power and nuclear weapons -- is having a moment in the spotlight. Companies such as  Energy Fuels, Inc.  have played  well-publicized roles in lobbying the Trump administration to reduce federal protection for  public lands  with uranium deposits. The Defense Department's Nuclear Posture Review calls for  new weapons production  to expand the US nuclear arsenal, which could spur new domestic uranium mining. And the Interior Department is advocating more domestic uranium production, along with other materials identified as " critical minerals ."  What would expanded uranium mining in the US mean at the local level? I have studied the legacies of past uranium mining and milling in Western states for over a decade. My  book  examines dilemmas faced by uranium communities caught between harmful legacies of previous mining booms and the potential promise of new ...
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Embattled Trump Nominee Inadvertently Draws Attention to Radiation in Drinking Water 11.1.2018 Truthout.com
Kathleen Hartnett White is probably best known for her idealistic view of fossil fuels, but a scandal from her tenure as a top environmental regulator in Texas is drawing attention to radiation in drinking water -- a problem environmentalists say is widespread and a public health concern. (Photo: Delwin ; Edited: LW / TO) Kathleen Hartnett White, President Trump's pick to run the White House Council on Environmental Quality, is probably best known for her idealistic view of fossil fuels. In 2014, she  suggested  that energy from fossil fuels "dissolved the economic justification for slavery" in the British Empire. As the Texas Observer  noted  at the time, coal mining fueled industrialization that actually increased demand for cotton picked by colonial slaves in the early 19th century. Hartnett White has other controversial ideas. She told the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee in November that climate science is still "subject to debate," and the degree that human-caused carbon pollution is ...
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Novel GammaPod system receives FDA clearance to treat early stage breast cancer 27.12.2017 Science / Technology News

"We believe this novel radiotherapy system has the potential to change the paradigm for treating early stage tumors, negating the need for surgery for some patients," says GammaPod co-inventor William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO, the Isadore & Fannie Schneider Foxman Endowed Chair and professor of radiation oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and chief of radiation oncology at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center . "With this breast-specific treatment system, we will be able to deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing damage to normal breast tissue and even more importantly, to major organs such as the heart and lungs," Dr. Regine says.

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The 26,000 tons of radioactive waste under Lake Powell 19.12.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The West’s uranium boom brought dozens of mills to the banks of the Colorado River — where toxic waste was dumped irresponsibly.
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Ludwig Researchers Unravel Novel Mechanism by Which Tumors Grow Resistant to Radiotherapy 23.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a key mechanism by which tumors develop resistance to radiation therapy and shown how such resistance might be overcome with drugs that are currently under development. The discovery addresses a longstanding challenge: as many as 40% of large tumors develop resistance to radiotherapy, significantly complicating treatment. Overcoming such resistance could go a long way toward treating tumors, especially those that cause significant discomfort to patients and resist other modes of therapy or cannot be surgically removed.
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Halving radiation therapy for HPV-related throat cancer offers fewer side effects and similar outcomes, Mayo study finds 26.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that a 50 percent reduction in the intensity and dose of radiation therapy for patients with HPV-related throat cancer reduced side effects with no loss in survival and no decrease in cure rates. Results of a phase II study were presented today at the 59th Annual Meetingof the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Diego by Daniel Ma, M.D. a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic.
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Positive, Negative or Neutral, It All Matters: NASA Explains Space Radiation 22.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Charged particles may be small, but they matter to astronauts. NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) is investigating these particles to solve one of its biggest challenges for a human journey to Mars: space radiation and its effects on the human body.
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Low-Level Radiation Less Harmful to Health Than Other Lifestyle Risks 13.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life due to its use in medicine, industry and the armed forces. Whilst the risks to human health from medium and high-level radiation are relatively well-understood, the risks at lower levels are less clear.  Mixed messages about the safety of low doses of radiation from different sources have created confusion for the public and for policy makers.  
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Study: Drug may curb female infertility from cancer treatments 2.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
An existing drug may one day protect premenopausal women from life-altering infertility that commonly follows cancer treatments, according to a new study.
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Uranium pervades homes on and near Navajo Nation 27.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
EPA budget cuts threaten to slow a long-overdue cleanup.
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NASA Protects Its Super Heroes From Space Weather 17.8.2017 Environmental News Network
It’s not a bird or a plane but it might be a solar storm. We like to think of astronauts as our super heroes, but the reality is astronauts are not built like Superman who gains strength from the sun. In fact, much of the energy radiating from the sun is harmful to us mere mortals.
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Don’t let this uranium mill repeat history 19.7.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The White Mesa Mill’s license is up for renewal under the Trump administration.
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Rocky Flats Made Nukes. Then It Made A Mess. Now It's About To Become A Public Park. 21.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ROCKY FLATS, Colo. ― Plutonium, named for the Roman god of the underworld and the dwarf planet at the edge of the solar system, is one of the world’s most dangerous elements. Inhaling just one particle will bombard internal organs, particularly the lungs and liver, with harmful alpha radiation for decades. For the most part, it isn’t naturally occurring. But until just over a decade ago, it was plentiful in this 5,000-acre patch of rolling hills and grasslands. From 1952 to 1989, this picturesque sanctuary was home to a factory that produced plutonium triggers for nuclear weapons ― a lot of them. Nearly all of the approximately 70,000  nuclear weapons produced in the United States include a part made at Rocky Flats. It was designated as a Superfund site in the early 1990s, and the radioactive materials have been removed. It’s scheduled to open to the public for the first time next summer . But rather than welcoming the prospect of thousands of new acres for recreation, some Coloradans are suing to stop ...
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"It's a Cover-Up, Not a Clean-Up": Nuclear Waste Smolders in Sites Across the US 30.3.2017 Truthout.com
Hanford, in Washington State, the scene of the largest radioactive cleanup in the country. Cleanup of toxic waste at Hanford has passed the 20-year mark already, and is expected to continue for decades. (Photo: Courtesy of Columbia Riverkeeper) The Manhattan Project and the Cold War have left a legacy of toxic and radioactive waste at sites across the nation, requiring the largest environmental cleanup in US history. Now many experts fear that the federal government, which has always underestimated the problem, will prioritize increasing nuclear armament over tackling nuclear waste under the Trump administration. Hanford, in Washington State, the scene of the largest radioactive cleanup in the country. Cleanup of toxic waste at Hanford has passed the 20-year mark already, and is expected to continue for decades. (Photo: Courtesy of Columbia Riverkeeper) You can support the best in on-the-ground reporting, scientific analysis and thorough investigative journalism. Make a donation to Truthout ...
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SLAC Study Helps Explain Why Uranium Persists in Groundwater at Former Mining Sites 6.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Decades after a uranium mine is shuttered, the radioactive element can still persist in groundwater at the site, despite cleanup efforts.A recent study led by scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory helps describe how the contaminant cycles through the environment at former uranium mining sites and why it can be difficult to remove. Contrary to assumptions that have been used for modeling uranium behavior, researchers found the contaminant binds to organic matter in sediments. The findings provide more accurate information for monitoring and remediation at the sites.The results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.In 2014, researchers at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) began collaborating with the DOE Office of Legacy Management, which handles contaminated sites associated with the legacy of DOE’s nuclear energy and weapons production activities. Through projects associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings ...
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NASA Studies Cosmic Radiation to Protect High-Altitude Travelers 30.1.2017 Environmental News Network
NASA scientists studying high-altitude radiation recently published new results on the effects of cosmic radiation in our atmosphere. Their research will help improve real-time radiation monitoring for aviation industry crew and passengers working in potentially higher radiation environments. Imagine you’re sitting on an airplane. Cruising through the stratosphere at 36,000 feet, you’re well above the clouds and birds, and indeed, much of the atmosphere. But, despite its looks, this region is far from empty.
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