User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Apr 21 2018 01:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Bayer-Monsanto Merger Is Bad News for the Planet 20.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Two new studies from Europe  have found that the number of farm birds in France has crashed by a third in just 15 years, with some species being almost eradicated. The collapse in the bird population  mirrors the discovery last October  that over three quarters of all flying insects in Germany have vanished in just three decades. Insects are the staple food source of birds, the pollinators of fruits, and the aerators of the soil. The chief suspect in this mass extinction is the aggressive use of neonicotinoid pesticides,  particularly imidacloprid and clothianidin, both made by German-based chemical giant Bayer . These pesticides,  along with toxic glyphosate herbicides (Roundup) , have delivered a one-two punch against Monarch butterflies, honeybees and birds. But rather than banning these toxic chemicals, on March 21st  the EU approved  the $66 billion merger of Bayer and Monsanto, the US agribusiness giant producing Roundup and the genetically modified (GMO) seeds that have reduced seed diversity ...
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California Court Blocks State Agriculture Department From Spraying Pesticides 4.3.2018 Truthout.com
In a win for environmental and public health advocates, a California court has halted a program that allows the state agriculture department to spray pesticides on public and private property without proper notice to the public about its intention to spray or adequate study of the possible adverse impacts of the chemicals used. The court order, which came late last week, was in response to a  lawsuit  brought by 11 environmental and public health groups -- including the Environmental Working Group, Center for Food Safety, Pesticide Action Network North America, Center for Biological Diversity, and Moms Advocating Sustainability -- and the city of Berkeley. The California Department of Food and Agriculture's (CDFA)  Plant Pest Prevention and Management Program , which is supposed to control outbreaks of invasive plant pests, gave the agency the license to use 79 pesticides -- including some known to cause cancer and birth defects and to be highly toxic to bees, butterflies, and other wildlife -- ...
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The strawberry industry is about to change forever 26.1.2018 TreeHugger
California's dominant strawberry market cannot survive without toxic soil fumigants, which have been recently banned.
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Genetic Changes Help Mosquitoes Survive Pesticide Attacks 3.1.2018 Environmental News Network
For decades, chemical pesticides have been the most important way of controlling insects like the Anopheles mosquito species that spreads malaria to humans. Unfortunately, the bugs have fought back, evolving genetic shields to protect themselves and their offspring from future attacks.
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Pesticides and Poor Nutrition Damage Animal Health 20.12.2017 Environmental News Network
The combined effects of pesticides and a lack of nutrition form a deadly one-two punch, new research from biologists at the University of California San Diego has shown for the first time.
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Pesticides Linked to Declining Bee Populations Also Threaten Birds and Small Mammals 19.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Environmental Protection Agency's latest assessment of four neonicotinoid pesticides linked to declining populations of pollinators show that they could also harm birds and small mammals, but the agency is reluctant to ban their use until it completes its review. Environmentalists, concerned that it may prove too late for some species, want restrictions placed on the chemicals. Support your favorite writers by making sure we can keep publishing them! Make a donation to Truthout to ensure independent journalism survives. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that popular pesticides linked to declining bee populations also pose a threat to birds and, in some cases, small mammals and insects. The EPA  released  preliminary scientific assessments of four chemicals from the neonicotinoid or "neonic" class of insecticides on Friday as part of an ongoing review that environmentalists and farmers are watching closely. Previous EPA assessments echoed  research   showing  that neonics can ...
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Do migrant workers have access to health care? 8.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Heryka Miranda Do migrant workers have healthcare? The answer to that question is not easy. As a condition of employment, migrant workers have the right to public healthcare , however, whether they have access is a more complicated question. Many workers do not know that they have healthcare, and generally only access emergency services. Most only have the right to the basic benefits available as a part of the provincial health system, not to dental, prescription drug and other such coverage. Migrant workers often work long hours for 6 or 7 days a week. When you add language barriers, lack of transportation, and fear of the employer finding out about their illnesses, many workers report major impediments to accessing healthcare . There are also important concerns about occupational health and safety, and currently there are campaigns to demand  better pesticide rules and improve occupational health and safety across North America.    I introduce to the reader two groups in the Niagara Region who are ...
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The Forest Service’s battle against illegal marijuana farms 31.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Drug cartels on federal land pose enormous environmental and financial costs.
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Exposure to Glyphosate, Chemical Found in Weed Killers, Increased Over 23 Years 24.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Analyzing samples from a prospective study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that human exposure to glyphosate, a chemical widely found in weed killers, has increased approximately 500 percent since the introduction of genetically modified crops.
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Novel Technique Explains Herbicide's Link to Parkinson's Disease 24.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Northwestern Medicine scientists have used an innovative gene editing technique to identify the genes that may lead to Parkinson’s disease after exposure to paraquat, a commonly-used herbicide.
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It's time to nix neonics 11.10.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David Suzuki The Canadian government is banning plastic microbeads in toiletries. Although designed to clean us, they're polluting the environment, putting the health of fish, wildlife and people at risk. Manufacturers and consumers ushered plastic microbeads into the marketplace, but when we learned of their dangers, we moved to phase them out. Why, then, is it taking so long to phase out the world's most widely used insecticides, neonicotinoids? Scientists have proven they're harming not only the pests they're designed to kill, but also a long list of non-target species, including pollinators we rely on globally for about one-third of food crops. Neonics are systemic pesticides. Plants absorb and integrate them into all tissues -- roots, stems, leaves, flowers, pollen and nectar. First introduced in the 1990s, they now account for one-third of the global pesticide market. Agricultural applications include leaf sprays, and seed and soil treatments. They're also used for trees, turf products, and flea ...
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The Vietnam War Is Not History For Victims Of Agent Orange 8.10.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The actions of the U.S. government and the U.S. manufacturers of Agent Orange and other deadly herbicides is a moral outrage.
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Diet Diary: The harmful effects of Glyphosate residue in food items 23.9.2017 Health – The Indian Express
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WSU researchers see popular herbicide affecting health across generations 21.9.2017 Environmental News Network
First, the good news. Washington State University researchers have found that a rat exposed to a popular herbicide while in the womb developed no diseases and showed no apparent health effects aside from lower weight.
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Pest control professionals have key role in public health: United Phosphorus Limited Chairman R D Shroff 21.8.2017 Pune – The Indian Express
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Heavily used pesticide linked to breathing problems in farmworkers' children 17.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Elemental sulfur, the most heavily used pesticide in California, may harm the respiratory health of children living near farms that use the pesticide, according to new research led by UC Berkeley.In a study of children in the Salinas Valley’s agricultural community, researchers found significant associations between elemental sulfur use and poorer respiratory health. The study linked reduced lung function, more asthma-related symptoms and higher asthma medication use in children living about a half-mile or less from recent elemental sulfur applications compared to unexposed children.
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When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice 9.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
CRISPR gene editing can fight crop disease far more benignly than conventional practices.
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Amid California’s toxic dumps, local activists go it alone 7.8.2017 Current Issue
The call themselves promotoras, and they’re starting to see results.
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New 'Monsanto Papers' Add To Questions Of Regulatory Collusion, Scientific Mischief 1.8.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The other shoe just dropped. Four months after the publication of a batch of internal Monsanto Co. documents stirred international
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"Poison Papers" Snapshot: HoJo Transcript Illustrates EPA Collusion With the Chemical Industry 28.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Poison Papers represent a vast trove of rediscovered chemical industry and regulatory agency documents and correspondence stretching back to the 1920s. Collectively they shed light on what was known about chemical toxicity, when, and by whom, in the often-incriminating words of the participants themselves. (Photo: fotografixx / iStock / Getty Images Plus) The world of independent chemical testing has a shiny veneer. The public is reassured that chemicals they're exposed to on a daily basis are certified by technicians in spotless white lab coats who carefully conduct scientific studies, including on animals in neat rows of cages. But a federal grand jury investigation that ended with convictions in the early 1980s discovered that Industrial Bio-Test Laboratories (IBT), the largest such lab in the United States, conducted trials with mice that regularly drowned in their feeding troughs. The dead animals would decompose so quickly that "their bodies  oozed  through wire cage bottoms and lay in purple ...
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