User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Health System
Last updated: Apr 26 2018 24:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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As Big Pharma Goes on Lobbying Blitz, US Waits for Trump to Tackle Drug Pricing 25.4.2018 Truthout.com
President Trump postponed a speech on bringing down prescription drug prices this week after promising to roll out a set of sweeping policy proposals with help from his health czar, Alex Azar. Trump has talked tough about reining in drug prices, but critics point out that Azar is a former pharmaceutical executive and real price controls would require policy changes the industry doesn't like. (Photo: DNY59 / Getty Images) Support your favorite writers by making sure we can keep publishing them! Make a donation to Truthout to ensure independent journalism survives. President Trump postponed a speech on drug pricing this week, leaving observers to wonder whether the White House is rethinking its long-awaited plan to fulfill a major campaign promise and bring down the price of prescription drugs. During his State of the Union address in January, Trump said that "fixing the injustice" of high drug prices was one of his administration's top priorities. On March 19, Trump and Health and Human Services Secretary ...
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California Leads Nation in Pushing Back Against Trump Administration Health Policies 23.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
By giving a monthly donation of even a small amount, you can make a big difference to Truthout's future. Sign up just once and read on, knowing that you've pledged your ongoing support! These days, when the federal government turns in one direction, California veers in the other -- and in the case of health care, it's a sharp swerve. In the nation's most populous state, lawmakers and other policymakers seemingly are not content simply to resist Republican efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. They are fighting to expand health coverage with a series of steps they hope will culminate in universal coverage for all Californians -- regardless of immigration status and despite potentially monumental price tags. The Golden State embraced the health care law early and eagerly, and has more to lose than any other state if the ACA is dismantled: About 1.5 million Californians purchase coverage through the state's Obamacare exchange, Covered California, and 3.8 million have signed up for Medicaid as a ...
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Progressive Candidates Are Pulling the Democratic Party Left, Whether the Establishment Likes It or Not 23.4.2018 Truthout.com
Cynthia Nixon, a lifelong New Yorker, actress, progressive advocate and candidate running for governor presented her Climate Justice Agenda on April 20, 2018, at the YMCA in the Rockaways. (Photo: Erik McGregor/Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images) Left-wing candidates are running on platforms of universal health care, racial and economic justice, and opposition to Trump. The result is an unprecedented level of enthusiasm among progressives in the run-up to the 2018 election. Cynthia Nixon, a lifelong New Yorker, actress, progressive advocate and candidate running for governor presented her Climate Justice Agenda on April 20, 2018, at the YMCA in the Rockaways. (Photo: Erik McGregor/Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images) This story was published because of support from readers like you. If you care about maintaining a free and independent media, make a donation to Truthout! Something about New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has changed. He announced on Wednesday that he would be restoring the ...
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Puerto Rico’s Slow-Going Recovery Means New Hardship For Dialysis Patients 22.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
If you believe in the importance of a free and independent press, take a moment to support Truthout's news and analysis by making a donation now! VIEQUES, Puerto Rico -- As the cry of a rooster heralded the dawn, Joe Garcia, 41, pulled a vial of insulin from the fridge. He filled a syringe and wrapped it in aluminum foil in preparation for the long day ahead. "I tell him that from here to there, that'll spoil," said his mother, Martina Collazo de Jesus, 63, watching the preparations under the fluorescent bulb lighting the family kitchen. It is a gamble Garcia, who has both diabetes and kidney failure, has taken since Hurricane Maria slammed this Puerto Rican island just east of the main island. More than six months after the storm, Garcia and 13 other Vieques residents must still board a plane three days a week for kidney dialysis on Puerto Rico's main island. Hurricane Maria totaled Vieques' hospital, which housed the island's only dialysis clinic. That set off an ongoing crisis for patients with kidney ...
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Patient Advocacy Groups Take in Millions From Drugmakers. Is There a Payback? 13.4.2018 Truthout.com
Pharmaceutical companies gave at least $116 million to patient advocacy groups in a single year. Even as these patient groups grow in number and political influence, their funding and their relationships to drugmakers are little understood.  (Photo: Last Resort / Getty Images) No "alternative facts" here -- we publish the uncensored, uncorrupted news you rely on. Support Truthout by making a donation! Pharmaceutical companies gave at least $116 million to patient advocacy groups in a single year, reveals a new database  logging 12,000 donations  from large publicly traded drugmakers to such organizations. Even as these patient groups grow in number and political influence, their funding and their relationships to drugmakers are little understood. Unlike payments to doctors and lobbying expenses, companies do not have to report payments to the groups. The database, called " Pre$cription for Power ," shows that donations to patient advocacy groups tallied for 2015 -- the most recent full year in which ...
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Medicaid Is Helping to Combat the Opioid Crisis, Despite Trump's Attacks 13.4.2018 Truthout.com
According to a new report, Medicaid is paying for more addiction treatment than private insurers, and recipients living with opioid disorders are twice as likely to obtain treatment. Medicaid is having an impact despite President Trump's efforts to undermine public benefits, and health experts say Trump's own plan for combating the opioid crisis would do more harm than good. (Photo: FS Productions / Getty Images) This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. About 1.9 million nonelderly adults in the United States are believed to be living with opioid addiction, and those with Medicaid were twice as likely as those with private insurance or no health insurance to receive treatment for the disease in 2016,  according to a new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation . The analysis raises serious questions for the Trump administration, which has declared the opioid crisis a major ...
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Hospitals Are Leaving Rural America. Rural Americans Are Staying Put. 9.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was originally published by TalkPoverty.org. Kendra Colburn spent a decade uninsured. During those years, she worked as a carpenter near her hometown in rural Vermont, earning just enough that she didn't qualify for low-income health care, but not enough to afford health insurance on her own. While uninsured, she suffered two major work injuries that landed her in the emergency room -- once, a nail shot through three of her fingers, and another time, a piece of wood kicked back on the table saw and sliced her arm. When she was unable to pay the emergency room costs, her credit took a hit for years. Today, Colburn works on her brother's farm and is covered by Medicaid. As a manual laborer, Colburn has developed nerve damage, which flares up in her hands and wrists with overuse. "I cut back my hours to deal with it. I can't afford to not be able to use my hands," she says. "That's how I make all of my money." As a child who grew up in a farming community, Colburn says she observed that pain is ...
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New Abortion Law Requires Doctors to Keep Records that Can Follow Patients Through Life 8.4.2018 Truthout.com
(Image: TippaPatt / Shutterstock; Edited: JR / TO) Indiana passed a new abortion law last week that has made the news.  Senate Bill 340  requires that doctors gather data about women who come to see them about "abortion complications," ostensibly to improve patient health and safety. Sounds good in theory but the law is so broadly drawn that it quickly becomes clear that the bill is actually designed to punish women who have obtained abortions. First, the "abortion complication" symptoms that trigger the reporting requirement are vast. In addition to physical complications that could occur from any kind of surgery, such as blood clots and infection, emotional and psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression are also included. Moreover, although the law requires that the symptoms must arise "from the induction or performance of an abortion," there is no time limit on the reporting requirement and no guidance for doctors to determine whether any of these symptoms actually "arose" from an ...
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Majority of Voters Say Lowering Drug Prices Should Be Congress's Top Priority 3.4.2018 Truthout.com
Consumers are up in arms, drug makers are battling insurance companies, grassroots activists are organizing, and a billionaire philanthropist is preparing to spend millions of dollars pressuring Congressional candidates. Here's how the debate over skyrocketing prescription drug costs will shape the midterm elections. (Photo: funnyangel / Shutterstock) Stories like this are more important than ever! To make sure Truthout can keep publishing them, please give a tax-deductible donation today. Public outrage over the rising cost of pharmaceutical drugs is poised to shape the upcoming midterm elections while bolstering support for a single-payer health care system. A recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation shows that 52 percent of the public says passing legislation to bring down prescription drug costs should be Congress's top priority, followed closely by passing an infrastructure bill to improve roads and bridges and addressing the opioid epidemic. More than three quarters of respondents said the Trump ...
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Trump's New VA Pick Appears Poised to Rubber-Stamp Privatization of Veterans Affairs 3.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
The firing of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin is a boon to the Koch Brothers' efforts to privatize the Veterans Health Administration. Trump's pick for VA chief appears likely to rubber-stamp their wishes, but the firing of Shulkin has also sparked a rare national debate on the harm that privatization will cause to veterans. President Donald Trump shakes hands with White House Physician Rear Admiral Dr. Ronny Jackson, following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, January 12, 2018. (Photo: Saul Loeb / AFP / Getty Images) This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. For the last year, Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin  insisted the  VA would not be privatized on his watch. Now, thanks to  a Koch-supported coup  at the top of the second-largest department in government, his watch has ended -- and the battle over ...
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Can the healthcare sector match big tech in going 100 percent renewable? 3.4.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Hospital, heal thyself.
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As Trump Targets Immigrants, Elderly Brace to Lose Caregivers 1.4.2018 Truthout.com
Thirty seconds: That's how long it takes to support the independent journalism at Truthout. We're counting on you. Click here to chip in! Boston -- After back-to-back, eight-hour shifts at a chiropractor's office and a rehab center, Nirva arrived outside an elderly woman's house just in time to help her up the front steps. Nirva took the woman's arm as she hoisted herself up, one step at a time, taking breaks to ease the pain in her hip. At the top, they stopped for a hug. "Hello, bella," Nirva said, using the word for "beautiful" in Italian. "Hi, baby," replied Isolina Dicenso, the 96-year-old woman she has helped care for for seven years. The women each bear accents from their homelands: Nirva, who asked that her full name be withheld, fled here from Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. Dicenso moved here from Italy in 1949. Over the years, Nirva, 46, has helped her live independently, giving her showers, changing her clothes, washing her windows, taking her to her favorite parks and discount grocery ...
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Single-Payer Health Care Takes Center Stage in Gubernatorial Races 29.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Democratic candidate for Illinois Governor Daniel Biss gives his concession speech after his loss in the Illinois primary election on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Chicago. (Photo: Chris Sweda / Chicago Tribune / TNS via Getty Images) In the coming gubernatorial races, many single-payer candidates are challenging incumbent or establishment Democrats. While it's hard to predict how some of these candidates will fare, advocates hope the 2018 election will put single-payer allies in governors' mansions across the US, thus increasing prospects for the policy at the state and federal levels. Democratic candidate for Illinois Governor Daniel Biss gives his concession speech after his loss in the Illinois primary election on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Chicago. (Photo: Chris Sweda / Chicago Tribune / TNS via Getty Images) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can't be found in corporate media! Chip in now by clicking here. Illinois state senator Daniel Biss recently ran for governor on a platform ...
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Tennessee Wants to Use Funding Meant for Poor Families to Kick People Off Medicaid 29.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
With your support, Truthout can continue exposing inequality, analyzing policy and reporting on the struggle for a better world. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. Nashville Public Radio  reported  over the weekend that the Tennessee legislature is finalizing legislation that would add work requirements to the state's Medicaid program, kicking at least 3,700 Tennessee workers off their health care. The state's Republican leaders appear to have no qualms about taking health insurance away from Tennesseans who can't find work or get enough hours at their job -- even though taking away someone's health insurance  isn't going to help them find work any faster , and can actually make it harder to find and keep a job. Instead, debate around the legislation has reportedly centered on how to pay for the new policy. Lawmakers' own estimates put the price tag for enforcing the new work rules at $10,000 per person disenrolled from Medicaid -- which advocates ...
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In the Age of Trump and "Janus v. AFSCME," Labor Must Rethink Its Organizing Strategies 28.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In a post-Janus world, we must democratize the union and focus on increasing participation by engaging the rank-and-file members, says organizer, scholar and author Jane McAlevey. In this new Gilded Age, creating a crisis in the economic arena is the most effective strategy. A union member holds a sign during a rally outside of San Francisco City Hall on February 26, 2018, in San Francisco, California. (Photo: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images) Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now more than a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators not only about how to resist but also about how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 116th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this one . Today we bring you a conversation with organizer ...
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Here's One Issue Blue and Red States Agree On: Preventing Deaths of Expectant and New Mothers 27.3.2018 Truthout.com
Alarmed that the US is the most dangerous affluent country in which to give birth, state and local lawmakers around the country are adopting a flurry of bipartisan bills aimed at reforming how maternal deaths are identified and investigated. In Indiana earlier this month, Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb signed  a bill  creating a maternal mortality review committee to scrutinize deaths and near-deaths among expectant and new mothers and make policy recommendations to improve maternal health. Oregon's governor and Washington, DC's mayor, both Democrats, are expected to sign similar legislation in the coming days. Proposals are pending in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Maryland and New Jersey. Legislators from several of these states credited the ProPublica/NPR  "Lost Mothers" series  with raising their awareness and concern about the issue. Maryland Delegate Jheanelle Wilkins, who introduced a bill there, said that the series, especially articles looking at why  black mothers  are at  greatest risk  of dying and ...
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I Treat Patients on Medicaid, and I Don't See Undeserving Poor People 23.3.2018 Truthout.com
You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. As  more states join Kentucky  in trying to impose work requirements for people who receive Medicaid, I could not help but think of a patient of mine whom I'll call Linda. Linda is a healthy 42-year-old woman who came in a few months ago with pain in her left foot. "Every morning when I wake up, it's like a knife in my heel" she said, grimacing, and held her foot up for me to see. "Is it cancer? It's so painful. What could cause that pain?" I examined her tender foot and launched into my well-practiced explanation of the problem: plantar fascitis, an inflammation of the tissues connecting the heel and toes, which is very common and in some cases very painful. I swiveled back from the computer with a handout and was stunned to see Linda weeping in relief. "I just, I really thought it was a tumor in my bone," she sighed, and folded the tissue I offered into a tiny square. I am accustomed to ...
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More people are seeking out mental health care, but psychiatrists are in short supply: 'It's getting worse' 22.3.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
Medical student Mila Grossman had just begun her first clinical rotation when she started to get an idea of what kind of doctor she wanted to be. Working at a women’s mental health clinic, she met a new mom who appeared put-together but inwardly suffered from painful postpartum ...
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A Koch-Supported Coup at the VA? The Veterans Health Administration Risks Being Dismantled 20.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin testifies before the House Veterans' Affairs Committee on Capitol Hill on February 15, 2018, in Washington, DC. Many veterans and organizers suggest that Shulkin is being pushed out in favor of putting an ideologue in charge willing to privatize veterans' health care. (Photo: Aaron P. Bernstein/ Getty Images) Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, the only Trump cabinet member to be unanimously confirmed, is now embroiled in scandal and the Koch-funded propaganda machine is working hard to amplify the bad news. This has veterans groups worried that Shulkin will be replaced by a candidate who will use the chaos to accelerate the privatization of the Veterans Health Administration. Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin testifies before the House Veterans' Affairs Committee on Capitol Hill on February 15, 2018, in Washington, DC. Many veterans and organizers suggest that Shulkin is being pushed out in favor of putting an ideologue in charge willing to privatize ...
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Fake Crisis Pregnancy Clinics Are Taking Their "Free Speech" Claim to the Supreme Court 18.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) claim that they have a First Amendment right to manipulate pregnant people into making "choices" based on an anti-abortion religious agenda. Now the Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case that will help decide whether the CPCs do indeed have the right to mislead pregnant people. (Image: Dariush M / Shutterstock) Imagine that you go to a health care clinic with a time-sensitive medical condition. There, you meet with a person you believe to be a doctor but who, unbeknownst to you, actually holds no medical degree. The "doctor" deliberately gives you information about your treatment options that is false or, at best, incomplete. When you request your medical records so you can get a second opinion, they refuse. It may sound far-fetched, but this is happening, right now,  at crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) all across the country . Their objective? To manipulate pregnant people into making "choices" that are based on an anti-choice religious agenda rather than what is best ...
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