User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Health System
Last updated: Feb 19 2018 23:06 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How Trump's Medicaid Restrictions Will Stop People From Voting 19.2.2018 Truthout.com
(Photo: Andrew Cline / Shutterstock.com) This article was published by TalkPoverty.org. The Trump administration released its fiscal year 2019 budget, and it doubles down on what the administration has already been doing to undermine Medicaid -- including more than $300 billion in cuts to the program and a call to take health insurance from those who can't find a job. Last month, the administration began testing these policies at the state level. On January 11th, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) announced that states can now compel low-income people who rely on Medicaid to meet "work and community engagement requirements" in order to keep their health insurance. Within a day of making this announcement, CMS approved Kentucky's plan to implement such requirements. The plan strips Medicaid coverage from most adults who fail to comply, including those who do not complete paperwork on time or report "changes in circumstances" quickly enough. All told, Gov. Matt Bevin's office estimates ...
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A Legal Battle Is Mounting Against the GOP's Attack on Medicaid 6.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
About 500 protesters chanting "Kill the Bill, Dont Kill Us!" filled the street outside the New York Stock Exchange on December 19, 2017 -- where the resources siphoned from the poor and middle class by the Republican tax bill will be concentrated. (Photo: Erik McGregor / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images) The GOP's latest major attack against Medicaid -- which would throw impoverished people off the program -- is not only harmful to the poor, but could serve to undermine the integrity of the program as a safety net. Activists and lawyers are now building a legal challenge against the White House and several state governments in an attempt to stop these policies before they can be implemented. About 500 protesters chanting "Kill the Bill, Dont Kill Us!" filled the street outside the New York Stock Exchange on December 19, 2017 -- where the resources siphoned from the poor and middle class by the Republican tax bill will be concentrated. (Photo: Erik McGregor / Pacific Press / LightRocket via ...
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Four Ways Trump and GOP Have Launched an All-Out Assault on the US's Poorest 4.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
President Donald J. Trump arrives for the State of the Union address in the chamber of the US House of Representatives, January 30, 2018, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images) The stories at Truthout equip ordinary people with the facts and resources to create extraordinary change. Support this vital work by making a tax-deductible donation now! During the first year of the Trump administration, the word "unprecedented" has been used so many times it has almost lost its meaning. But there simply is no other word to describe this presidency. First and foremost, there is the unprecedented degree to which the administration has attacked the country's institutions in ways that threaten the foundations of our democracy. But this first year is also unique because of the unforgiving extent to which the Trump administration and the Republican-controlled Congress have leveled legislative assaults against poor people.  1. Attempts to Repeal the Affordable Care Act Perhaps no issue is more ...
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BMC Budget 2019-19: Old announcements repackaged in health sector 3.2.2018 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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Medicare-for-All Proponents Warn Against Billionaires' Plan to "Disrupt" Health Care Industry 31.1.2018 Truthout.com
— Jordan (@JordanChariton) January 30, 2018 While the three companies appear ready to capitalize on Americans' dissatisfaction with the for-profit health insurance sector by promising an alternative, a growing majority support a government-run or single-payer healthcare system like the ones enjoyed by every other industrialized nation in the world. Fifty-three percent now  support  a plan like Sen. Bernie Sanders' (I-Vt.) Medicare for All proposal, up from just 50 percent in 2016. At Jacobin -- in a piece titled "You Can't Trust Capitalists" -- Meagan Day and Dustin Guastella  warned  after Sanders' Town Hall on Medicare for All last week that single-payer advocates should be wary of any attempts by corporations to wade into the national debate over how healthcare should be provided in the US. "When progressive and left-wing politicians and political organizations neglect to keep capitalists at arm's length, the latter's outsize resources give them outsized influence -- often resulting in weakened policy ...
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Technology and health care stocks jump as US indexes rise 27.1.2018 Science / Technology News

U.S. stocks are rising Friday morning as technology and health care companies make more gains. Chipmaker Intel and drugmaker AbbVie are jumping after they did far better than analysts expected in the fourth quarter.

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The hidden health inequalities that Indigenous peoples face 27.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Disparities are shaped by social inequality, historical trauma and discrimination.
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Why Climate Change Is Worsening Public Health Problems 26.1.2018 Truthout.com
With your support, Truthout can continue exposing inequality, analyzing policy and reporting on the struggle for a better world. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation. Around the world, the health care debate often revolves around access. Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, head of the World Health Organization, recently announced: "All roads lead to universal health coverage." Discussions for how to translate this vision into a road map for action is central to the agenda of the WHO's executive board meeting this week in Geneva. Yet focusing on access is not enough. The imperative for access must be paired with a frank acknowledgment that climate change is making communities around the world more vulnerable to ill health. A 2017 commission of The Lancet , a leading health research journal, tracked the effects of climate change on health and found evidence of harms "far worse that previously understood." Even as we move to close the access gap, a string of natural disasters in late 2017, including ...
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Medicaid Work Requirements Could Cost the Government More in the Long Run 24.1.2018 Truthout.com
After the Trump administration gave states permission to impose  new restrictions on Medicaid eligibility ,  Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin  wasted no time.  Within days, Kentucky instituted a new rule requiring "able-bodied" adults on the health insurance program for the poor and disabled to complete 80 hours of " community engagement " per month. Paid work, job training, volunteering or being the primary caregiver for children and the elderly all count.  Advocates for disabled and low-income people fear that this mandate, which could spread to at least 10 other states, will  strip millions of insured Americans  of their health coverage. The states taking this step say it has become increasingly hard for them to  cover their share  of Medicaid's costs. But, based on my  health economics research , I believe that the policy is unfair to the most vulnerable and may end up not saving any money. Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, whose office estimates that its plan to impose new work requirements on people with ...
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We Must Stop Framing Programs Like Medicaid in Republican Terms if We Are to Save Them 24.1.2018 Truthout.com
Medicaid, nutrition assistance and affordable housing aren't "handouts" to the "lazy," despite the Republicans' racially-charged framing of these incredibly popular programs, says Rebecca Vallas of the Center for American Progress. They are essential programs created to help ordinary people. Participants hold signs during the Senate Democrats' rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the US Capitol on Tuesday, June 6, 2017. (Photo: Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call) Our journalists work tirelessly to deliver the news to you every day! Will you sign up for a monthly donation and become one of the many readers who sustain Truthout's work? Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a ...
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Home Care Agencies Often Wrongly Deny Medicare Help To The Chronically Ill 23.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Medicare does cover home care services for patients who qualify, but incentives are driving some home health agencies to avoid taking on long-term patients. Under a Medicare pilot program, home health firms in nine states will start receiving payment bonuses for providing good care and those who don't will pay penalties. Whether you read Truthout daily, weekly or even once a month, now's the perfect time to show that you value real journalism. Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here! Colin Campbell needs help dressing, bathing and moving between his bed and his wheelchair. He has a feeding tube because his partially paralyzed tongue makes swallowing "almost impossible," he said. Campbell, 58, spends $4,000 a month on home health care services so he can continue to live in his home just outside Los Angeles. Eight years ago, he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or "Lou Gehrig's disease," which relentlessly attacks the nerve cells in his brain and spinal cord and has no cure. The former ...
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Trump's New Health Division Embodies Institutional Oppression, Not "Religious Freedom" 18.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Fear of discrimination and violence already takes an enormous toll on the health and well-being of so many living under the Trump administration. Today's action denying women, LGBT and non-binary people agency over their own bodies further institutionalizes the ability to reject health care for whole groups of people and will likely lead to devastating health outcomes and death for many. Sen. James Lankford speaks at a news conference announcing a new division on Conscience and Religious Freedom as Office of Civil Rights Director Roger Severino (center) and Acting Secretary Kevin Hargan (right) lat the Department of Health and Human Services look on, January 18, 2018, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Aaron P. Bernstein / Getty Images) Truthout readers like you made this story possible. Show your support for independent news: Make a tax-deductible donation today! The Trump administration today announced the creation of what it is calling a " new conscience and religious freedom division " within the Office for ...
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Wasatch Front Inversions Could Cause More Than 200 Cases of Pneumonia Each Year 16.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Air pollution trapped along the Wasatch Front by winter inversions are estimated to send more than 200 people to the emergency room with pneumonia each year, according to a study by University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare. Bad air quality especially erodes the health of adults over age 65, a population particularly vulnerable to the effects of pneumonia.
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OSU cancer hospital tries less invasive robotic surgery 13.1.2018 Science / Technology News

Surgeons Dr. Mary Dillhoff and Dr. Carl Schmidt with the da Vinci robot at the OSU Wexner Medical Center December 21, 2017. The James Hospital used a new surgical procedure called a Robotic Whipple for the first time last month to remove a pre-cancerous mass on a man from Marion.

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A majority of Montana counties face primary care shortages 11.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The gap in health care access is particularly acute in rural areas.
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William views pioneering robotic surgery on cancer hospital patients 11.1.2018 Science / Technology News

The Duke of Cambridge donned surgical scrubs to learn about the pioneering robotic surgery of a leading cancer hospital - then joked its surgeons were computer game fanatics. Dressed in a blue top, trousers and cap, and wearing a pair of slip-on foam rubber Crocs, the future king was taken into the operating theatres of the Royal Marsden Hospital to watch tumours being removed from patients with the help of the machines.

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Children's Health Insurance Program Set for Five-Year Extension 6.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: UW Health ) Congress appears poised to finally ensure that millions of kids who rely on the federal government for healthcare won't have to depend on the legislative process for the rest of President Trump's first term. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) touted a proposed five-year renewal of the Children's Health Insurance Program on Thursday morning. CHIP expired in October, as Congressional Republicans scrambled to ram through landmark reductions to the corporate tax rate before the end of the year. "This month, we can set this right" McConnell said on the  Senate floor . He was referencing a government funding deal that must be passed in two weeks. The federal government is scheduled to run out of money on January 19 -- the third such deadline Congress has set for itself in the last two months. During the last shutdown aversion deal, reached just before the Christmas holiday, lawmakers approved of a deal that extended CHIP funding for three months. McConnell blamed Democrats for a ...
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"Working People Are the Real Experts on Their Lives": How a Grassroots Group in North Carolina Is Fighting Trump's Betrayal 3.1.2018 Truthout.com
North Carolina's working poor thought they were being listened to -- now they feel betrayed and duped, say Down Home North Carolina organizers. The organization that grew out of the ashes of the 2016 election, is helping people in rural North Carolina tap into their own talent as organizers. (Photo: Cyndi Hoelzle / EyeEm / Getty Images) Our journalists work tirelessly to deliver the news to you every day! Will you sign up for a monthly donation and become one of the many readers who sustain Truthout's work? Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now nearly a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 104th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this ...
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How One Mississippi Teen Went 1,266 Days Behind Bars Before Receiving a Mental Evaluation 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Michael Gaida ) On Nov. 17, 2012, Tyler Haire was arrested in Vardaman, Mississippi, for attacking his father's girlfriend with a knife. Tyler, 16, had called 911 himself, and when they arrived, the local police found him seated quietly on a tree stump outside the home on County Road 433. The boy alternately said he could remember nothing and that they had the wrong man. Tyler was taken to the county jail in Pittsboro, 12 miles away, where the sheriff, worried that the awkward and overweight boy might hurt himself or be targeted by other inmates, placed him in a cell used for solitary confinement. Tyler had turned 17 by the time, five months later, a grand jury indicted him for aggravated assault, and his case went before a judge. Tyler's defense lawyer, appointed by the court, informed the judge in a court filing that his attempts at speaking with the boy had made it apparent the 17-year-old did not have "sufficient mental capacity" to understand the charge he was facing. The lawyer wanted Tyler ...
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Doing Less With Less: Mental Health Care in Mississippi 29.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The state of mental health care in Mississippi has been in freefall for years. As a consequence of the ripple effects of the financial crisis, Mississippi saw its state support for mental health care slashed by $42 million from 2009 to 2011, roughly 15 percent of the Department of Mental Health's budget. The cuts continued in 2017 and the consequences of a refusal to fund adequate mental health care are showing up throughout state-funded institutions.  A national recession. Years of state budgets cuts. It's no surprise requests mental health resources for prisoners are routinely rejected in Mississippi. (Image: Lauren Walker / Truthout) The state of mental health care in Mississippi has been in freefall for years. As a consequence of the ripple effects of the financial crisis, Mississippi saw its state support for mental health care slashed by $42 million from 2009 to 2011, roughly 15 percent of the Department of Mental Health's budget. The state, which had 1,156 psychiatric beds in 2010, has just 486 ...
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