User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Health System
Last updated: Jul 10 2018 16:04 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Canadian health care will be front and centre in both Canadian and U.S. elections 15.8.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Canadian health care will be front and centre in both Canadian and U.S. elections
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Our emerging civilization 25.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Among progressives few dreams are more resonant than the hope of building another, better, world. Peering into the shimmering crystal ball however does not seem to reveal much hope. The post-911 period has witnessed the deployment of large armies throughout the Middle East and Africa, appearing to confirm that peace between various "civilizations" is impossible. The end of the Cold War (1945-1989) did not signal the conclusion of international discord but seems to have simply opened the door to other suppressed storms. In 1993 the conservative political scientist Samuel Huntington (1927-2008) claimed that the U.S. victory over the Soviet Union would not lead to an " end of history ." Despite the United States having emerged victorious in the 20th century over Nazism and Soviet Communism, different societies around the world would not start looking to the United States, and its liberal, democratic capitalist system, for guidance. Huntington, adopting a perspective akin to a right-wing postmodernism or a ...
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Trans youth challenging barriers to gender-affirming health care 25.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
LGBTIQ Kaeden Seburn is a Bachelor of Social Work student at Carleton University and a community organizer and advocate. Jay Burns is a high school student currently finishing Grade 12. Both are active members of SAEFTY Ottawa , a group run by and for trans and gender-diverse youth. Scott Neigh interviews them about SAEFTY and about the group's use of research and advocacy to challenge barriers that youth face in accessing gender-affirming health care. Many, though not all, trans and gender-diverse people seek to access various kinds of health-care interventions that affirm their gender. This can include taking hormone blockers and/or hormones, and it can include various kinds of surgical interventions. The history of trans people's struggles to access this sort of care is long, complicated, and highly contested. They have won significant victories, but many barriers remain. In Ottawa, most trans or gender-diverse youth who wish to receive gender-affirming care are referred by their family physician to ...
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Federal unions speak out against P3; new pilot for care workers offers respite; and Manitoba nurses protest health-care changes 20.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar PSAC decries $2.6 billion public-private partnership for heating and cooling federal buildings Environment Minister Catherine McKenna has been enthusiastic about a contract with a private consortium to upgrade heating and cooling infrastructure in federal buildings. But PSAC and other public sector unions say that such partnerships do not provide value for taxpayer funds, the Hill Times reports . Trudeau government announces new pilots for care workers New pilot programs for domestic care workers will grant open work permits to them and their immediate family members, the Toronto Star reports . Care workers have long demanded open work permits that would allow them to escape abuse by exploitative employers. New security rules making it tougher to find seasonal farm workers The CBC reports that businesses accustomed to using temporary foreign farm workers are finding it tough due to new government rules requiring biometric data. The articles quotes an employer saying that Canadian residents ...
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Here's a bet: Alberta Health Services review announced yesterday will cost more than any savings it finds 31.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Tyler Shandro was pretty bold yesterday when he put out a Government of Alberta news release announcing the United Conservative Party Government's promised review of Alberta Health Services. Shandro is the baby-faced MLA for Calgary-Acadia who was made minister of health by Premier Jason Kenney. He is a lawyer and former member of several important boards, including the Calgary Police Commission and the National Parole Board, so you wouldn't think that he's a dope. Just the same, so far he's attracted attention from coast to coast for his unintentionally hilarious performance sticking too close to what was apparently his single authorized talking point -- that, "in due course" something would happen. "AHS review to find savings, improve performance," read the headline on Shandro's announcement, which was doubtless written by a professional. A subhead continued: "A performance review of Alberta Health Services will identify ways to deliver better results for Albertans and find ...
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UCP posturing around public sector wages portends a return to perpetual crisis in health care 15.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga The United Conservative Party Government's transparent early manoeuvres around public sector wage negotiations and the heavy hints found in a paper by the chair of Premier Jason Kenney's "blue ribbon panel" on Alberta's finances portend a stormy period ahead in public sector labour relations, especially in health care. Since health care makes up such a significant portion of the Alberta and Canadian public sectors, this in turn signals a return to the perpetual crisis that is emblematic of the health-care system under Conservative rule. So if you were one of those Alberta voters for whom health care had ceased to be a front-burner issue under the capable leadership of former NDP health minister Sarah Hoffman (now the Opposition education critic), well … fasten your seatbelt! In a news release yesterday , United Nurses of Alberta's labour relations director David Harrigan revealed that even before its MLAs had been sworn in, Kenney's UCP government was interfering with the collective ...
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The UCP health platform: mostly spin, some two-tier medicine, and scraps of red meat for the base 29.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Jason Kenney's health-care policy announcement yesterday was a typical conservative political speech -- a mish-mash of anodyne sentiment, misleading spin, market-fundamentalist nostrums, scraps of red meat for the base, cheap shots at the federal government, terrible ideas he'll implement if he gets the chance, and even a couple of good ones he'd probably ignore. However, it was almost entirely delivered in a reasonable, even soothing tone of voice. So you had to listen carefully and make frequent use of your political decoder ring to understand the bad stuff. But there was a bit of a bombshell at the end -- a barely disguised pitch for full-on, two-tier, cash-for-care medicine in the final two minutes. Kenney employs competent political advisers. So how did that slip past the spinmeisters? I don't know about you, but when Kenney started rambling on about the so-called Chaoulli decision it sounded to me as if his mouth got jammed in motor mode and no one on his staff had the presence ...
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What drives the conservative urge to wreck public health care? 28.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga One of the unusual features of the past four years in Alberta has been the remarkable calm that has prevailed in our normally tumultuous, shambolic, sometimes chaotic health-care system. Under the NDP government, for the first time in the past 30 years at least, health care hasn't been a continual gong show, spinning ever closer to the edge under a series of conservative governments that couldn't keep their political paws off the system and swung back and forth from crisis-inducing austerity to hair-on-fire crisis spending. This may have been because conservative ideology runs counter to reality -- no, in health care, "market solutions" do not work very well, no matter what you may wish to believe. Or it may have been because, as some theorize darkly, conservatives don't really want to see public health care succeed and therefore encourage failure to justify marketization. Whatever, while many flaws remain in this large, complex and costly system, health care has never run more ...
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Countering U.S. attacks on Canadian health care 25.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Dennis Gruending A friend travelling in Europe pleaded recently on Facebook for information to help her respond to a fellow tourist, an "alpha male" from the U.S., who was criticizing the Canadian health-care system. He claimed, for example, that he had seen statistics showing that 20 per cent of Canadians go to the U.S. each year for elective surgery. We should brace for more such criticisms, as Senator Bernie Sanders and at least some Democrats promote what they call "Medicare-for-All" as a plank for the 2020 US elections. They view Canada's system as a possible model. As for my friend, I did some quick research and responded to her, as did a number of her other Facebook contacts. Ignorantly wrong The alpha male critic is simply and ignorantly wrong to say that 20 per cent of Canadians (seven million people) go to the U.S. annually for elective surgery. The Vancouver-based Fraser Institute is a right-wing organization known for its hostility to Medicare. It claims that 63,000 Canadians sought medical ...
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U.S. struggle for universal health care has reached a tipping point 14.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
US Politics Last week, as the media focused on U.S. President Donald Trump's North Korea summit in Vietnam and the congressional testimony of his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen, a largely overlooked news conference took place, announcing legislation that could save millions of lives. Seattle Democratic Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal introduced the Medicare For All Act of 2019, the latest attempt to pass single-payer health care. Jayapal's bill has 106 co-sponsors, close to half of the Democrats in the House. Jayapal is the co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, the largest caucus in the House. Among the bill's co-sponsors was Michigan Democrat Debbie Dingell. She replaced her late husband, John Dingell Jr., who was the longest-serving member of Congress in history, holding the seat since 1955. John Dingell, who died in February at the age of 92, was a stalwart backer of single-payer health care, introducing legislation yearly during his 60-year tenure. He was inspired by his father, John ...
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Has a UCP candidate voiced what her party really thinks about two-tier health care? 26.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga If you wonder what the United Conservative Party really thinks about how health care ought to be run in Alberta, perhaps you should ask Miranda Rosin instead of Jason Kenney. Rosin is the UCP's candidate in the new Banff-Kananaskis riding. Kenney is the party's leader, of course, and as we now know, its Decider as well. In a Canadian Taxpayers Federation-style stunt last week, Kenney publicly signed a "Public Health Care Guarantee" on a large sheet of plastic saying his party is committed to "maintain a universally accessible, publicly funded health-care system." Taking the pledge resulted in a certain amount of derision, owing to the fact Kenney's "Grassroots Guarantee," wherein he promised always to listen to what the grassroots members of his party had to say, became defunct the instant it became inconvenient. By contrast, Rosin is just one of the troops -- who in the UCP are expected to mind their Ps and Qs and do whatever the leader tells them to do. Her suddenly controversial ...
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You can't slash Alberta Health Services' efficient management without hurting front-line care 22.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Just a reminder, folks: You can't cut Alberta Health Services management without cutting front-line health care. One of Opposition Leader Jason Kenney's standard talking points is that he'll never cut front-line health care, only needless, redundant, expensive managers cluttering up the system. And since I'm a good union guy, some readers probably figure I should say much the same thing. As the United Conservative Party leader put it in a recent press release : "We need to push the resources and decision-making to the greatest extent possible out to where they are used, to the front lines. We need to reduce the massive bureaucracy and administration that has grown in the centre of the system." The nicest thing that can be said about what Kenney's been saying about health-care management in Alberta is that it's deceptive, certainly intentionally so. A couple of pithy agricultural terms spring to mind. It's a poorly guarded secret of health care in Canada that most managers in the ...
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Kenney's 'Public Health Guarantee' not worth much, but may be good enough for many voters 21.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga No one ever said Jason Kenney isn't a shrewd politician who knows how to run a campaign, so give the man some credit for his clever effort yesterday to look strong on a weak file for his party and make the NDP look a little weaker on its strongest. The United Conservative Party leader looked for all the world the Canadian Taxpayers Federation agitator he used to be as he bent over to sign a "Public Health Guarantee" on a Coroplast sign promising to maintain health-care funding and "a universally accessible, publicly funded health-care system." One problem with Kenney's guarantees, of course, is that they aren't really worth the plastic sheet they're printed on, as scores of observers were soon pointing out on Twitter. Who can forget the "Grassroots Guarantee" Kenney signed on another piece of plastic last year? He tossed it over the side the instant party members passed a potentially politically embarrassing policy motion on Gay-Straight Alliances at a UCP policy conference in Red ...
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Long-delayed introduction of pharmacare should be top priority in this election 15.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn When the government of Saskatchewan pioneered public health care in Canada in 1962, it covered the two main components of such a system: the services of physicians and hospitals. When other provinces, and finally the federal government, later extended medicare to the national level, it was still confined to these two admittedly important but insufficient-on-their-own benefits. Tommy Douglas, the main proponent of public health care in Canada, always envisioned this two-pronged program as just the first step toward complete health care coverage. His ultimate goal was to have prescription drugs, dental, vision, and other important services added to the system, as they already were in most countries in Europe. If those countries could afford such comprehensive care, he reasoned, so could Canada. More than half a century later, however, his vision of providing Canadians with all-inclusive health care remains unfulfilled. The biggest gap, of course, is the lack of universal public drug insurance. One ...
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Protests planned across Canada to demand universal health care access 11.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Protests planned across Canada to demand universal health care access
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Protests planned across Canada to demand universal health-care access 9.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Sophia Reuss Tremé Manning-Cere On February 12, people in 15 cities across the country will be demonstrating to demand that health care be made accessible to everyone living in Canada, regardless of immigration status. The national day of action, organized by a national coalition of migrant justice groups and spearheaded by OHIP for All, comes as a response to a United Nations Human Rights Committee (UNHRC) decision condemning Canada for restricting access to health care on the basis of immigration status.  The decision , issued in August 2018, gave the Canadian federal government 180 days to respond to the decision and "ensure the right to life extends to reasonably foreseeable threats and life-threatening situations that can result in loss of life." The 180-day period for response ended February 9. UN orders Canada to act The UNHRC based its decision on a case filed by Nell Toussaint in 2014. Toussaint moved to Canada in 1999, and as a result of financial barriers and medical issues, delayed filing her ...
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Through environmental stewardship, hospitals can preserve and protect health 10.7.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Catholic Health Initiatives argues that the call to action never has been stronger or more important in the face of a changing climate.
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Expert group denounces the refusal to treat under 'conscientious objection' 5.7.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Food & Health For the first time ever, an expert group has arrived at a majority consensus that the practice of so-called "conscientious objection" by health-care professionals should not be allowed. The experts agreed that the practice of refusing to provide legal and essential health care due to a doctor's personal or religious beliefs is a violation of medical ethics and of patients' right to health care. Abortion and other reproductive health care are the most commonly refused services. Unconscionable: When Providers Deny Abortion Care is the title of the expert group's just-released report with recommendations. It is a product of the first global meeting on the topic of "conscientious objection," which took place in Montevideo, Uruguay in August 2017 because the refusal to treat is a major barrier to abortion access in many Latin American countries . Organized by the International Women's Health Coalition and Mujer y Salud en Uruguay (Women and Health in Uruguay), the meeting brought together 45 ...
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Just what the doctor ordered: Kaiser powers forward with renewable microgrids 5.7.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
The critical systems at its facility in Richmond, California, can operate for up to three hours when the broader grid goes down.
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Ontario fightback: Progressive MPPs headed to Queens Park speak out 28.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar On June 29 Ontarians will have a new premier who takes power with a Progressive Conservative majority government. However, Ontarians also elected some amazing progressive candidates, and at rabble.ca we intend to amplify what people are doing to stand for what Ontarians want and to continue to support progressive change. This is the first of a new Activist Toolkit series on Ontario's fightback against proposed cutbacks and attacks on the things you believe are important. Tell us about what you are doing by sending an email to maya[at]rabble.ca. To launch the series, we reached out to all the progressive MPPs who were elected and asked them three questions: why they ran, what they heard at doors, and what we can do to help them stand for Ontarians. After a hard-fought campaign, the slate of MPPs headed to Queens Park are busy and need time to recuperate. We are so grateful to (in no particular order) France Gélinas (Nickel Belt), Peter Tabuns (Toronto Danforth), Laura Mae Lindo  (Kitchener ...
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