User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Independent
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Oct 26 2020 15:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South 21.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South Danielle Purifoy Wed, 10/21/2020 - 00:45 This story was originally published by Southerly , in partnership with Scalawag and Environmental Health News for its Powerlines series, which looks at climate change, justice, and infrastructure in the American South. The series is supported by the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University, and is part of their  POWER project .  In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner’s community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for  Clean Water for North Carolina , she’d met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its  first North Carolina plant  there two years before.  The corporation, which manufactures wood pellets as a purportedly renewable alternative to coal, did what most industries do in ...
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‘Somebody has to keep people on their toes’ 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
High Country News’ unlikely and remarkable origin story.
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Extreme heat is here, and it’s deadly 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Gearing up for the fight against a new climate enemy.
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Engaging Middle America in recycling solutions 26.8.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Engaging Middle America in recycling solutions Suzanne Shelton Wed, 08/26/2020 - 01:00 A few weeks ago, I wrote a GreenBiz piece about what Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs can teach us about the moment we’re in right now, based on our latest polling of Americans. At Circularity 2020, I’m talking about how to engage people in recycling, and the two ideas are linked together. The gist is that we can’t self-actualize as the people we want to be if we’re not getting our basic needs met. Pre-COVID, 41 percent of us wanted to be seen as someone who buys green products, and 25 percent of us could cough up an example, unaided, of a brand we’d purchased or not purchased because of the environmental record of the manufacturer. As of late May, smack in the middle of the pandemic, these numbers dropped dramatically, down to 2013 levels at 33 percent and 19 percent respectively. In the rock-paper-scissors game of survival, we just can’t take action on higher-level things when we’re worried about meeting our basic needs. ...
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How big oil funds big brother 30.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Some of the largest fossil fuel companies in the nation back police foundations that raise money for weapons, equipment and surveillance technology.
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How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice 6.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How 5 communities across the US are seeking environmental justice Kristoffer Tigue Mon, 07/06/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in InsideClimate News and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. In many ways, Maleta Kimmons defines her neighborhood by what it lacks. Several houses near her home remain vacant. Last week, she had to drive seven miles just to buy groceries. And two weeks ago, at the height of the Minneapolis protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a police officer May 25, looters broke into the only pharmacy in the area, forcing the store to close and leaving many in the neighborhood without easy access to life-saving medication such as insulin or inhalers for asthma. Kimmons, who prefers to go by the name Queen, said what her neighborhood doesn't lack is pollution. Near North, where Queen lives, is one of several neighborhoods that make up north Minneapolis, a  predominately ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni 29.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni Heather Clancy Mon, 06/29/2020 - 02:30 June 22 marked the publication of the fifth annual GreenBiz 30 Under 30 , our report celebrating rising young professionals in the field of corporate sustainability.  What’s up in the worlds of the 120 alumni from past lists? We reached out this spring to check in, asking those inclined to weigh in on how current events have changed their world views. We asked them to consider two questions: With the world turned upside down, what is your focus at work? Do you think the COVID-19 crisis marks a turning point for the sustainability movement?  Following are some of their responses, lightly edited, representing perspective from all four past cohorts. We did not specifically ask the alumni to consider the broader question of systemic racism, as our outreach was completed prior to the national protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. But look for future updates and essays on this topic, such as ...
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How Black environmentalists are organizing to save the planet from injustice 26.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
How Black environmentalists are organizing to save the planet from injustice Rachel Ramirez Fri, 06/26/2020 - 00:30 This story originally appeared in Grist;  and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. "I can’t breathe." These were among the final words that George Floyd and Eric Garner gasped before their deaths at the hands of white police officers. That plea has become part of the current rallying cry for racial justice and an end to police brutality in the United States. But for Black people living near industrial facilities, the phrase has an additional layer of meaning: a reminder of their disproportionate pollution burden. "While many in power seemed surprised that COVID-19 is killing twice as many Black Americans, those of us in the environmental justice movement know that the health impacts of cumulative and disproportionate levels of pollution in our communities have created underlying health ...
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Could indoor air quality become part of the post coronavirus playbook? 15.5.2020 GreenBiz.com
Could indoor air quality become part of the post coronavirus playbook? Joe Snider Fri, 05/15/2020 - 01:29 Here is what we know, or think we know, about COVID-19: it can spread through the air. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , it is thought that the COVID-19 virus can spread "through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks." According to a news release from the National Institutes of Health on March 17, these respiratory droplets seem to be detectable in the air for as long as three hours. Here is what we also know about hospital buildings and the way they are designed: Ventilation is an important aspect for the design of medical facilities, embraced to prevent the spread of airborne disease. As engineer Gregory Hudson notes in his article " Ventilation Strategies for Healthcare Facilities ," "Appropriate ventilation, when properly applied and designed, can limit the spread of airborne pathogens throughout a healthcare ...
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Trump admin sprints to weaken environmental protections during pandemic 12.5.2020 High Country News Most Recent
‘There’s a lot they want to get done before the election, just in case.’
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The global economy depends on clean air 28.4.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
To repair our economy and ensure its resilience, we can — and we must — solve for public and planetary health at the same time.
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How the pandemic will set back environmental science 24.4.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Across the Western U.S., researchers are worried about unmonitored threatened species.
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Reflecting and resetting on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day 22.4.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
COVID-19 is starkly illustrating how critical it is to reduce our impact on the planet and the urgent need to try harder to address societal inequalities.
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A roadmap for restoring our life support system 21.4.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Ecologist John Harte explains how we can use the same interconnectedness that is spurring catastrophe to promote health and sustainability.
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Why Earth Day needs to be an official company holiday 20.4.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
It demonstrates to others that you place the planet above profits, and you’re willing to prove it.
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Are wildland firefighters at a greater risk from COVID-19? 17.4.2020 High Country News Most Recent
New research suggests that the smoke firefighters breathe makes the disease more threatening.
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Turning black swans green 13.4.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Black swans, grey swans, green swans — a guided tour through a sustainability-minded recovery.
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How the next coronavirus stimulus could be a win-win for cruise lines and the environment 7.4.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
As the federal government seeks to bail out the industry, environmental advocacy organizations urged Congress to ensure that any financial aid for cruise lines come with strings attached.
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