User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Regional
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: Jun 24 2016 11:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Tuesday's primary election heats up for Colorado U.S. Senate race 24.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
On Tuesday, registered Republicans in Northwest Colorado who have not already participated in early voting will have some decisions to make. Here is a brief overview of the primary races concluding on Tuesday and the candidates competing. Colorado U.S. Senate These five Republican candidates are vying for the chance to run against Democrat incumbent Michael Bennet. Robert Blaha Born and raised in a farming community in Iowa, Blaha said he understands the challenges facing rural Colorado and is fiscally and socially conservative. Blaha said he is a 35-year career businessman who is disagrees with the “permanent political class running the country.” “Frankly, what they want to do is just stay at the trough of the public and feed as long as they can,” he said. In terms of the coal industry, Blaha said he is knowledgeable and has worked in the private sector, building scrubbing systems for coal-fired plants. “I know a lot about Colorado coal. I know how clean it is,” he said. “I know that the plan to kill ...
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Coal giant’s hiccup causes turmoil in dependent Colorado towns 23.6.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Peabody Energy’s failure to pay a $1.2 million June installment to Routt County translated almost instantly to trouble for fire protection, the library, cemetery and school for 325 children. It is an example of how the shaky status of coal-mining companies reverberates around the West.
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Coal isn’t dying because there’s a war on it 21.6.2016 Denver Post: Opinion
The reality is that coal is the victim of competition from cheaper natural gas, green-energy sources, and too much debt taken on to pay for costly and ill-timed acquisitions.
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Beaten-down coal might be heating up 17.6.2016 Denver Post: Business
With U.S. production falling earlier this year to its lowest level in a generation, investors are betting the worst is over, BB&T's Mark Levin said Wednesday in a note to clients.
It’s time to put a price on carbon 16.6.2016 Writers on the Range
The United States should set a persuasive example for the rest of the world.
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Letter: Clean power benefits more than just recreation 14.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Your editorial described the EPA’s decision to require selective catalytic reduction equipment on two Emery County coal-fired power plants as a big win for the recreation economy, but I contend it is a big win for everyone. The trend away from generating power from coal is not new. If the EPA regulations force a more proactive transition to cleaner energy, it will eventually benefit all stakeholders, from coal miners who will need training in new occupations to all of us who breathe and look out...
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Obama mentor paid to fight climate plan 14.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Peabody Energy Corp. is set to pay President Barack Obama’s Harvard Law School mentor $435,000 this year to help the bankrupt coal producer challenge the administration’s signature environmental law. The payments to Laurence Tribe, a constitutional law expert and legal icon — spanning May to December this year — were disclosed in a legal filing tied to Peabody’s bankruptcy proceedings. They do not include any money Peabody sent Tribe before its April bankruptcy filing as part of the company’s cr...
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Bankrupt Peabody coal hires legal icon Laurence Tribe to fight climate plan 14.6.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Peabody Energy Corp. is set to pay President Barack Obama’s Harvard Law School mentor $435,000 this year to help the bankrupt coal producer challenge the administration’s signature environmental law.
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Utah's needs ignored in California's outline for managing regional power grid, leaders say 14.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
A proposal from California that would guarantee individual states’ authority over energy policy hasn’t assuaged Utah leaders’ concerns about the plan to centralize the management of the Western U.S. electrical grid. According to the document, the grid’s managers would be bound by legal provisions that would “preserve state authority over matters currently regulated by the states themselves” and be barred from “adopting any policy that would diminish or impair state or local authority in those ar... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Op-ed: EPA's expensive haze solution won't produce detectable difference 10.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Seven hundred million dollars. That’s how much of your money that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is willing to throw away for nothing. This is no joke. At issue is a recent decision by the EPA to reject Utah’s visibility improvement plan and impose a federal plan in its stead. By the EPA’s own admission, its plan would cost $700 million more than the state’s plan. And for what? The EPA uses a metric known as a “deciview” to measure visibility improvement. A deciview value of 0 repres...
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California moving forward with plans for regional power grid, but questions, debate far from over 7.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Two California entities are forging ahead with a plan to create a regional grid involving Utah and 10 other western states. The California Independent System Operator — or CAISO, the nonprofit most assume will manage electrical distribution on behalf of the utilities that opt into the regional grid — recently released the preliminary results of its research into the impact a regional grid would have on the environment, the economy, vulnerable populations and California electrical customers. And...
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Investors bet coal has a future as backup to renewable energy 5.6.2016 Denver Post: Business
Two investors are betting they can make a profit from coal by burning hardly any of it.
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Trump’s plan to “drill, baby, drill” would distort market 5.6.2016 Denver Post: Opinion
If anything, Donald Trump's approach to energy would backfire. He would encourage so much production of fossil fuels that prices would plummet, not increase.
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Investors bet coal has a future as a backup 4.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Two investors are betting they can make a profit from coal by burning hardly any of it. Daniel Kretinsky, 40, and Patrik Tkac, 43, are trying to capitalize on Europe’s rapid expansion into renewables by embracing the fuel, a mainstay of European energy before efforts to curb global warming, in its new role as a backup for when the wind dies down and the sun fails to shine. Their Prague-based company bought Britain’s Eggborough plant in 2014 and last year acquired EON’s fossil-fuel stations in It...
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Sierra Club: Closing Nevada coal plant saves money 4.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Reno, Nev. • Conservationists say electrical ratepayers would save hundreds of millions of dollars if a big coal-fired power plant in northern Nevada was shut down earlier than its planned closure. Scheduled to close in 2025, the North Valmy plant along U.S. Interstate 80 about 200 miles east of Reno is the last fully functioning coal plant in Nevada and the state’s single largest source of carbon pollution. Leaders of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign released an economic analysis Friday t...
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Wyoming considers raising an already unique wind tax 3.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Legislators say wind needs to pay its fair share, but critics fear a higher tax could drive energy—and revenue—away.
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Trump’s contradictory promise: Bring back coal and boost natural gas 3.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Experts say low natural gas prices are the biggest cause of coal’s downturn.
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Colorado’s leading coal mine cuts jobs, accelerating industry collapse 3.6.2016 Denver Post: Business
Owners of the Colorado coal mine that produced the most last year, the West Elk, on Thursday said they will cut 80 workers, about a quarter of the workforce -- blaming declining U.S. and world demand for coal.
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Rocky Mountain Power weighs legal options as EPA mandates pollution controls at Utah coal plants 2.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
After years of delay, the Environmental Protection Agency has decided to require two coal-fired power plants in Utah to install additional pollution controls in order to improve visibility at nearby national parks. Utah must be in compliance with the federal plan within five years of the EPA’s Wednesday decision — but that may not be the final word on the matter. Rocky Mountain Power, which owns the power plants in question, is weighing legal options. And the state asserts that its own plan is l... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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EPA will require more pollution controls at Utah coal plants 2.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
After years of delay, the Environmental Protection Agency has decided to require two large coal-fired power plants in Utah to install additional pollution controls in order to improve visibility at nearby national parks. The federal plan will replace parts of a state-drafted Regional Haze Rule implementation plan that proposed to credit Utah for the closure of Rocky Mountain Power’s Carbon plant in April 2015. The Regional Haze Rule is a federal regulation that mandates “natural” air conditions... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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