User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-National
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Oil and Gas
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 16:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A Sioux Version Of Occupy Wall Street 20.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com In our new political world, the phrase "follow the money" has real meaning. Consider the $1,530,000 that, according to OpenSecrets.org, billionaire Kelcy Warren has personally given away in the 2016 election cycle to influence your vote (or someone's vote anyway). One hundred percent of his dollars, just in case you were curious, have gone to "conservative" candidates, including key congressional Republicans. Warren is a Texas oil pipeline magnate who's wildly rich. According to the Wall Street Journal, "his 23,000-square-foot Dallas mansion, bought for $30 million in 2009, includes a bowling alley and a baseball diamond that features a scoreboard with 'Warren' as one of the teams." As Sue Sturgis of the Institute for Southern Studies wrote recently , "With business partner Ray Davis, co-owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team, Warren built Energy Transfer Equity into one of the nation's largest pipeline companies, which now owns about 71,000 miles of pipelines carrying ...
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Big Bank 'Greenwashing' Exposed as Major Climate Week Sponsors Fund Fossil Fuels 20.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

Big bank sponsorship of Climate Week 2016, which kicked off Monday in New York City, "amounts to little more than greenwashing," according one environmental organization, given financial institutions' business-as-usual investment in fossil fuels.

Indeed, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) charges three major sponsors—Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, and Bank of the West (BNP Paribas)—with "helping [to] drive the climate crisis" through their ongoing funding of extreme fossil fuels such as coal and tar sands oil. 

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Breaking the Climate Procrastination Habit: How to Bring on America the Sustainable 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Emily Schwartz Greco

President Barack Obama calls climate change the greatest “threat to future generations.” To do something about it, he raised fuel-efficiency standards, launched his currently stalled Clean Power Plan, and tucked

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Indians and Cowboys The 2016 Version of an Old Story on a New Planet 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Chip Ward

Cowboys and Indians are at it again.

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Indians And Cowboys: Last Stand At Standing Rock 20.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Cowboys and Indians are at it again.  Americans who don’t live in the West may think that the historic clash of Native Americans and pioneering settlers is long past because the Indians were, after all, defeated and now drive cars, watch television, and shop at Walmart.  Not so.  That classic American narrative is back big time, only the Indians are now the good guys and the cowboys -- well, their right-wing representatives, anyway -- are on the warpath, trying to grab 640 million acres of public lands that they can plunder as if it were yesteryear.  Meanwhile, in the Dakotas, America’s Manifest Destiny, that historic push across the Great Plains to the Pacific (murdering and pillaging along the way), seems to be making a return trip to Sioux country in a form that could have planetary consequences. Energy Transfer Partners is now building the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.7 billion oil slick of a project.  It’s slated to go from the Bakken gas and oil fracking fields in ...
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Exploring the Gap Between Business-as-Usual and Utter Doom 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Richard Heinberg

Predicting the future is a fool’s errand, but everybody does it. As long as we’ve had language—for tens of thousands of years, at last estimate—we’ve been able to formulate the question, “What will tomorrow bring?” The answers have ranged from idyllic to hellish, though the reality has been, more often than not, “a lot like today.”

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As Dakota Access Protests Escalated, Obama Admin OK'd Same Company for Two Pipelines to Mexico 20.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-Posted from DeSmogBlog Photo Credit: C-SPAN On September 9, the Obama administration revoked authorization for construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline  (DAPL) on federally controlled lands and asked the pipeline's owners, led by Energy Transfer Partners, to voluntarily halt construction on adjacent areas at the center of protests by Native Americans and supporters. However, at the same time the pipeline and protests surrounding it were galvanizing an international swell of solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and its Sacred Stone Camp, another federal move on two key pipelines has flown under the radar. In May, the federal government quietly approved permits for two Texas pipelines -- the Trans-Pecos and Comanche Trail Pipelines -- also owned by Energy Transfer Partners. This action and related moves will ensure that U.S. fracked gas will be flooding the energy grid in Mexico. The Dakota Access Pipeline is also set to carry oil obtained via hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") , but in the ...
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Cautionary Tale for Mexico on Oil and Gas Climate Pollution 20.9.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Daniel Zavala-Araiza   New findings by NASA scientists attributing a giant, invisible cloud of methane – nearly 5 times the size of Mexico City – over the southwestern U.S. to the region’s sprawling web of oil and gas facilities raise important new concerns not just on this side of the border, but for Mexico as well. Methane is an extremely potent greenhouse gas, with more than 80 times the warming power of carbon dioxide over a 20-year timeframe. Scientists estimate that methane contributes to about 25 percent of today’s warming. Cleaning up methane also reduces other pollutants: both ozone precursors that affect air quality and air toxics that erode human health. The recent NASA paper  linking the methane cloud to production, processing and distribution of oil and natural gas also notes that just a small portion of these sites, about 10%, were responsible for more than half the emissions. This is just the most recent example of a long list of scientific studies that have found that subset of sites ...
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Banks Sponsoring ‘Climate Week NYC’ Responsible for Investing Billions in Extreme Fossil Fuels 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

As ‘Climate Week NYC’ kicks off today, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) questions the climate integrity of three major event sponsors. RAN research shows that these sponsors, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, and Bank of the West (BNP Paribas)  are helping drive the climate crisis by pumping hundreds of billions of dollars into extreme fossil fuels.

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America's first wave-produced power goes online 20.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii • Off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity. The current travels through an undersea cable for a mile to a military base, where it feeds into Oahu’s power grid — the first wave-produced electricity to go online in the U.S. By some estimates, the ocean’s endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America’s energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation’s reliance on oil, gas and c...
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Southern California gas prices may spike soon. Here's why. 20.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A widespread Southern California Edison power outage early Monday forced the shutdown of the Torrance refinery, raising concerns that gasoline prices throughout Southern California may see a temporary spike.

The power outage at 3:31 a.m. cut electricity to 57,582 customers in Gardena, Hawthorne,...

SoCal gas prices may spike after temporary shutdown of Torrance refinery 19.9.2016 LA Times: Business

A widespread Southern California Edison power outage early Monday forced the shutdown of the Torrance refinery, raising concerns that gasoline prices throughout Southern California may see a temporary spike.

The power outage at 3:31 a.m. cut electricity to 57,582 customers in Gardena, Hawthorne,...

River at Risk: Oil, Gas, Nukes Threaten New York Health 19.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Hudson River is under threat, again. Just when we thought we were in the clear - and that river towns up and down the Hudson Valley could enjoy scenic river views for restaurants, new housing, parks and other critical economic development - we're playing defense, again. Oil barges, nuclear plants and gas pipelines all now threaten the integrity of the river. Remember that not too long ago the river was the dumping ground for toxics and municipal waste and that it's still recovering from General Electric's inexcusable release of PCBs into public waters. Had it not been for Hudson Valley voices - like the Riverkeeper and those who care about Clearwater (thank you, Pete Seeger) - we'd still have sludge and fecal matter floating by Manhattan. Now it's a different kind of threat. While it's not sewage, it's equally serious, if not more so. It's oil, it's nuclear and it's gas. Ignore for a moment that these are all wrong directions for our energy transition - as non-renewable, toxic and expensive fuels - ...
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Native American candidates hope for pipeline protest boost 17.9.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

FORT PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — Henry Red Cloud’s recent trip to the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation filled him with conviction, compelling the South Dakota Democratic candidate to dance, sing — and campaign. The 56-year-old Oglala Sioux green energy entrepreneur hopes the vigor focused on defeating the $3.8 billion, […]
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Why a Donald Trump Victory Could Make Climate Catastrophe Inevitable 17.9.2016 Mother Jones
This story first appeared at TomDispatch.com . In a year of record-setting heat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and fast-rising sea levels, ratification of the December 2015 Paris climate summit agreement—already endorsed by most nations—should be a complete no-brainer. That it isn't tells you a great deal about our world. Global geopolitics and the possible rightward lurch of many countries (including a potential deal-breaking election in the United States that could put a climate denier in the White House) spell bad news for the fate of the Earth. It's worth exploring how this might come to be. The delegates to that 2015 climate summit were in general accord about the science of climate change and the need to cap global warming at 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius (or 2.6 to 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) before a planetary catastrophe ensues. They disagreed, however, about much else. Some key countries were in outright conflict with other states (Russia with Ukraine, for ...
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On renewables, Trump caught between corn, oil 17.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Donald Trump is trying to walk a fine line between Iowa corn interests and the oil industry. The Republican presidential candidate’s struggle to appease the antagonistic industries was in the spotlight Thursday when his campaign published a fact sheet calling for the elimination of a slew of regulations, including a scandal-marred system of buying and selling biofuel blending credits that some oil refiners hate. “The EPA’s renewable identification number program penalizes refineries if they do n...
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Briefs: Gas prices, Herbert, PRMI 17.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah gas prices stayed steady all summer, but Utahns were paying 9th highest rates in the country The price of gas has stayed steady in Utah all summer, which is good but could have been better if residents weren’t already paying the 9th highest rates in the country. AAA Utah said the average price for regular gasoline in Utah was $2.33 on Tuesday — exactly the same as in July and August — and 45 cents cheaper than a year ago. Nationally, that average gallon of regular gas costs $2.18, with pr...
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North Sea proves resilient to oil-price slump 17.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Oil producers in the North Sea were supposed to be among the first victims of OPEC’s battle for market share. Instead their high-cost, decades-old facilities are proving surprisingly resilient to the price slump. Crude oil and condensate output is likely to continue rising in the U.K. North Sea until 2018 as projects that were sanctioned before crude’s plunge four years ago start up, according to estimates by industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Even though production dips after that, output ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Pipeline shutdown in Alabama could send gas prices higher 17.9.2016 AP Business
DALLAS (AP) -- Motorists in the Southeast and East could pay more for gasoline in coming days because of the shutdown of a leaking pipeline in Alabama....
Community and Conservation Groups Condemn FERC’s Review of Proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline 17.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Chesapeake Climate Action Network Federal regulators today released a draft environmental review for the proposed fracked-gas Mountain Valley Pipeline that public interest advocates say fails to adequately assess the public need for the project and the widespread threats to private property, public lands, local communities, water quality and the ...
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