On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-National
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: Dec 26 2018 20:09 IST RSS 2.0
 
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You say old coal plant, I say new green hydrogen facility 24.11.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
You say old coal plant, I say new green hydrogen facility Lincoln Bleveans Tue, 11/24/2020 - 01:30 Relics. Environmental hotspots. Or maybe reminders of a simpler time. Good or bad, no one views America’s old coal-fired power plants with indifference.  In their day, they were reliable, cost-effective backbones of America’s economy, driving some of the most spectacular growth the world has seen. Powering industry, commerce and society, they generated not just electricity but economic ecosystems that stretched far beyond the plants themselves and often served as the mainstay for thriving middle-class communities.  But then the environmental realities came into sharper focus: air, soil, and water pollution and greenhouse gases at the smokestack. At the same time, advances in natural gas production such as fracking (controversial in their own right) have made natural gas-fired power a better economic choice than coal-generated power. Recognition of those externalities, especially GHG emssions, further erodes ...
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The fossil fuel industry wants you to believe it's good for people of color 23.11.2020 LA Times: Environment

The climate crisis disproportionately harms Black people, Latinos and Native Americans. But oil and gas supporters are trying to claim the moral high ground.

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Illinois AG secures $370K for community health in Little Village after smokestack demolition, but some say it’s not enough 21.11.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
The Illinois Attorney General's Office has reached a $370,000 settlement with the developer and subcontractors involved in the demolition of a smokestack at a former power plant that sent a cloud of smoke over Little Village.
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Climate Action Must Progress Far Faster to Achieve 1.5 C Goal 20.11.2020 THE CITY FIX
Countries agreed to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) and ideally 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F) as part of the 2015 Paris Agreement. The latest science shows that emissions will need to drop ...
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Climate Action Must Progress Far Faster to Achieve 1.5 C Goal 19.11.2020 WRI Stories
Print Coal-fired power plant in central Wyoming, United States. Photo by Greg Goebel/Wikimedia Commons Countries agreed to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) and ideally 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F) as part of the 2015 Paris Agreement. The latest science shows that emissions will need to drop by half by 2030 and reach net-zero by mid-century to meet this goal and prevent the worst impacts of climate change.  The question is: Are we on track to meet climate targets by 2030 and 2050? A report  from WRI and ClimateWorks Foundation found that in all but a couple of cases, progress is happening far too slowly for the world to meet its emissions-reduction targets – and in some cases, we’re moving in the entirely wrong direction. The State of Climate Action report assessed 21 indicators across six key sectors. Of all the indicators assessed, two show a historical rate of change sufficient to meet both 2030 and 2050 targets; 13 indicators show change headed in the right direction, ...
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The 'war on coal' is over. The next climate battle has just begun 17.11.2020 LA Times: Business

Joe Biden wants to reach 100% clean energy by 2035. But activists are worried he'll choose Ernest Moniz for energy secretary.

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How public benefits programs can help protect fossil fuel workers and communities in transition 12.11.2020 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
How public benefits programs can help protect fossil fuel workers and communities in transition
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How Europe's Wood Pellet Appetite Worsens Environmental Racism in the US South 10.11.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner's community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for Clean Water for North Carolina, she'd met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its first North Carolina plant there two years before.

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Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South 21.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South Danielle Purifoy Wed, 10/21/2020 - 00:45 This story was originally published by Southerly , in partnership with Scalawag and Environmental Health News for its Powerlines series, which looks at climate change, justice, and infrastructure in the American South. The series is supported by the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University, and is part of their  POWER project .  In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner’s community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for  Clean Water for North Carolina , she’d met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its  first North Carolina plant  there two years before.  The corporation, which manufactures wood pellets as a purportedly renewable alternative to coal, did what most industries do in ...
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Clean Energy Can Help Southeast Asia Recover After COVID-19 19.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print This farming couple in Thailand rents out some of their land for a wind turbine. Photo by Asian Development Bank. Prior to the devastating impacts of COVID-19, Southeast Asia was becoming an economic powerhouse. Manufacturing, industry and services expanded across the region in recent decades. Energy demand also grew an average of 6% per year, one of the fastest growth rates in the world. But despite the global decline in renewable energy prices, Southeast Asian countries have largely embraced fossil fuels to meet their growing energy needs. Close to 60% of Indonesia's electricity supply comes from its 29 gigawatt (GW) coal fleet. An additional 24.7 GW is in the works, making the country's coal pipeline the fifth largest in the world. The latest Philippine Energy Plan proposed expanding the share of coal in the energy mix from an already high 52.1% in 2018 to 55.3% by 2040 to support industrialization. The share of renewables in the Philippines' generation mix dropped to 21% in 2019, from more than ...
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The Spin: President Trump heading to hospital, receives experimental drug after testing positive for COVID-19 | Inside Michael Madigan’s patronage playbook | Pritzker touts green energy even as his administration opens door to new coal mine 3.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Welcome to The Spin, the Chicago Tribune's daily politics newsletter.
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Gov. J.B. Pritzker vows to fight climate change with clean energy. Only three other states mined more climate-changing coal than Illinois last year. 2.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Gov. J.B. Pritzker vows to fight climate change with clean energy. Only three other states mined more climate-changing coal than Illinois last year.
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Texas company to close all of its Illinois coal-fired power plants, another sign the global transition to clean energy is accelerating 30.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Vistra Energy absorbed nine of the state’s coal plants during a corporate merger just two years ago. Like its predecessors, the company found it increasingly difficult to profit from burning coal amid competition from cheaper, cleaner natural gas and renewable energy.
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China and Big Business Give Climate Diplomacy a Kick-Start at UNGA and Climate Week 29.9.2020 WRI Stories
Print UN complex in New York City. Photo by Ashitaka San/Flickr Last week marked the beginning of the UN’s 75th General Assembly (UNGA) and the first time the General Debate, a worldwide meeting, has been virtual. Founded on a belief in the importance of multilateralism and collective action, the first UNGA took place in the wake of the devastation of World War II. Today, the world faces enormous challenges, as people, communities, companies and countries wrestle with the health, economic and unemployment impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, severe wildfires in the Western U.S., floods in the Sahel and a record number of hurricanes remind us that climate change is already here and affects us all. While these daunting challenges are far from being overcome, this UNGA and the concurrent Climate Week offered a crucial moment for leaders to demonstrate global solidarity for a fairer, safer, stronger world. Did they succeed? Government Action In anticipation of this moment, countries, regions ...
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“My Friends Were Lied to”: Will Coalminers Stand by Trump as Jobs Disappear? 28.9.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in the Guardian and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Art Sullivan is considered something of a political heretic by other coalminers in south-western Pennsylvania, where a wave of support for Donald Trump based upon his flamboyant promises of a resurgence in coal helped propel the Republican to the […]
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Environmental remediation and infrastructure policies offer crucial opportunities for fossil fuel communities in transition 16.9.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
This second report in a joint research series by Environmental Defense Fund and Resources for the Future examines U.S. federal environmental remediation and infrastructure policies that can create jobs and restore communities that have been historically reliant on fossil fuels. Daniel Raimi of RFF authored the report described in this blog post. All views expressed […]
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Not Enough Climate Action in Stimulus Plans 15.9.2020 WRI Stories
Not Enough Climate Action in Stimulus Plans Comments|Add Comment|PrintElectric vehicle charging stations, Ontario, Canada. Photo by Mariordo/Wikimedia Commons Governments have already announced $11.8 trillion in fiscal stimulus in response to the COVID-19 health and economic crisis, more than three times the amount spent in response to the Great Recession of 2008-09. While most of it will prioritize healthcare and direct support to the unemployed, about 30% of stimulus packages are being spent... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Trump EPA Guts Tough Standards for Toxic Metals Dumped Into Us Waterways by Coal-Fired Power Plants, Including Biggest Polluter on Lake Michigan 11.9.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Towering above Lake Michigan north of the Wisconsin border, the Oak Creek coal-fired power plant is one of the largest sources of toxic metals dumped into American waterways. Only six other power plants nationwide released more arsenic, lead, mercury and other metals into lakes and rivers last year, according to a Chicago Tribune analysis of federal records.

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Powering China with Clean Energy After COVID-19 10.9.2020 WRI Stories
Powering China with Clean Energy After COVID-19 Comments|Add Comment|PrintRooftop solar panels in Kunming, China. Photo by Matthijs Koster/Flickr Following the outbreak of the new coronavirus (COVID-19), and its serious social and economic impact, China has started to stimulate its economy in an effort to recover. Provinces have announced their investment plans, in which new infrastructure plays an extremely important role. This infrastructure will also profoundly affect the development of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Trump EPA guts tough standards for toxic metals dumped into U.S. waterways by coal-fired power plants, including biggest polluter on Lake Michigan 9.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Benefits for energy companies would come at the expense of more than 20 million Americans who drink water and eat fish from lakes and rivers polluted by coal plant discharges, documents show.
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