User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-National
Category: Conservation and Efficiency
Last updated: Jul 26 2017 19:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Four ways businesses and cities will get us to a low-carbon future 26.7.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Ellen Shenette A little over a week ago, 20 of the world’s power houses came together for the Group of 20 summit. It was disappointing to see Trump hold firm to his decision to exit the Paris Agreement while 19 world leaders publicly reaffirmed their commitment. But something good has come out of Trump’s climate defiance, and I bet it’s not the reaction he was looking for: climate action. The inability for the federal government to agree on climate doesn’t stop momentum– it fuels it. An enormous swell of energy and activism has swept across America. Businesses, states, cities and citizens are stepping up, creating plans to pursue lower emissions on their own. There are now over 1,400 cities, states and businesses that have vowed to meet Paris commitments, sending a message that “we’re still in” and making enormous strides on devising climate solutions that keep the agenda alive. EDF Climate Corps' ten years of experience gives us an inside look into how companies, cities and non-profits are taking ...
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This Energy Bill Lays the Groundwork for a Much Bigger Fight to Come 25.7.2017 Mother Jones
The Senate soon could be considering legislation to modernize the nation’s energy policy. The wide-ranging and surprisingly bi-partisan bill, co-sponsored by Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chair Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Ranking Member Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), updates policies on a host of issues, including oil and gas, minerals, infrastructure, cybersecurity, and the grid. Last year, the Senate […]
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Who Charmed Whom? 21.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Associated Press reports that French President Emmanuel Macron has been reminiscing about his meetings with Donald Trump
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How to pack more power into NYC’s energy-efficiency bill package 20.7.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Abbey Brown Climate of Hope, United States Climate Alliance… These are a couple of initiatives and organizations formed by individual citizens, cities, and states to fight climate change since the President withdrew the United States from the Paris Agreements. And, I’m proud to say New York City is in on it. Earlier last month, the New York City Council introduced a package of bills designed to make buildings more energy efficient. Given that about 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the City come from heating and cooling buildings, regulating how buildings manage energy is crucial to reaching Mayor Bill de Blasio’s goal of reducing citywide emissions 80 percent below 2005 levels by 2050. The bills Here’s a rundown: 1629 : Proposes that the mayor’s administration be required to submit recommendations to the Council for a more stringent energy code. Going forward, new construction, or buildings which undergo substantial renovation would be required to comply with these more energy efficient ...
Will proposed cuts undermine Trump’s vision of ‘energy dominance’? 20.7.2017 Washington Post
Will proposed cuts undermine Trump’s vision of ‘energy dominance’?
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New algorithm, metrics improve autonomous underwater vehicles' energy efficiency 20.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Robotics researchers have found a way for autonomous underwater vehicles to navigate strong currents with greater energy efficiency, which means the AUVs can gather data longer and better.AUVs such as underwater gliders are valuable research tools limited primarily by their energy budget – every bit of battery power wasted via inefficient trajectories cuts into the time they can spend working.
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SLC fades, then passes, energy ordinance after Mormon church complains about public reporting 12.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake City officials have toned down plans to tune up energy-inefficient buildings after pressure from legislators, business leaders and a real estate arm of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The capital’s Sustainability Department on Tuesday presented the City Council with an updated and scaled-back version of a proposed ordinance that council members had tabled in January. The earlier version would have required owners of buildings larger than 25,000 square feet to report th...
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The Energy 202: Trump could start his infrastructure push at Energy Department 11.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Remember Solyndra?
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New plan could double $2.5 billion energy efficiency success in Illinois 11.7.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Christie Hicks and Dick Munson Just how valuable is energy efficiency? To the customers of ComEd, Illinois’ largest electric utility, efficiency’s value is in the billions – $2.5 billion, to be exact. That’s how much ComEd customers have saved to date through the utility’s energy efficiency program, and thanks to a new plan under the Future Energy Jobs Act , more savings – and less pollution – are on the way. ComEd agreed to invest $350 million each year for the next four years in energy efficiency programs, resulting in new initiatives that “will nearly double savings for customers and reduce electricity use in Illinois by 21 percent by 2030.” Expanding on success At the end of 2016, Illinois passed the Future Energy Jobs Act, the most significant climate and clean energy bill in state history. The legislation went into effect this month and doubles the state’s successful energy efficiency portfolio. New plan could double $2.5 billion energy efficiency success in Illinois Click To Tweet To get there, ...
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Energy efficiency is a 'win-win' for investors 11.7.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Access to better data and sharper analysis should help unlock the huge returns on offer from energy efficiency investments. So why is progress so slow?
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How ‘Energy Week’ could learn from state clean energy leaders 6.7.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Rory Christian President Trump’s administration dubbed last week “ Energy Week ,” including a theme of “energy dominance.” Instead of exploring America’s clean energy potential, we’re waiting for the July release of a report by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) examining whether the early retirement of power plants and impact on grid reliability can be blamed on requiring coal plants to reduce pollution while incentivizing clean energy sources. Taken together, and with the fact that the president pulled the country out of the Paris Agreement , America’s energy agenda gives me pause and cause to worry. We don’t yet know what the DOE report is going to say, but judging from Secretary of Energy Rick Perry’s past stance on energy and his latest statements on the matter , it could suggest that the coal industry that has long-been economically uncompetitive due to oversupplied, cheap natural gas , could be propped-up to spew toxic emissions into the future. Here is the reality: climate change is not a ...
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Why advanced energy is winning, despite federal odds (and oddities) 3.7.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
In a twist on the decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, might observers have cared more about losing it than they did about signing it?
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Six months into the presidency, where are all the jobs? 28.6.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Liz Delaney We’re halfway through “Energy Week” at the White House–a series of events promoting President Trump’s energy policies. These are policies the administration claims will boost the economy and grow America’s energy dominance (note the change from “energy interdependence” to “energy dominance”), while creating jobs by reviving America’s declining coal industry. It’s the same plan we’ve heard since Trump’s first day as President. So let’s ask ourselves, is it working? Slashing climate policies In March, Trump signed an executive order to dismantle the Clean Power Plan, and on June 1st, he followed through on his promise to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement. These reckless decisions were a major setback to both our nation’s economy and our job market. The decision to withdraw from Paris was justified by the “economic unfairness” that it would bring upon the country, citing negative effects on jobs. The administration claimed they would continue to be the “cleanest and most ...
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Efficiency powers Hawaii's quest for energy independence 26.6.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
As the state pursues renewables, it's also a matter of doing more with less energy.
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Conference: US mayors may shape national climate policy 24.6.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — With the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accords, national policy on climate change will emerge from U.S. cities working to reduce emissions and become more resilient to rising sea levels, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said at the annual U.S. Conferences of Mayors meeting in Miami Beach. The […]
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REBA, a Google SVP and a physicist find the equation for change 22.6.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Google's Urs Holzle, the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance and John Goodenough have the imagination and capacity to make the impossible possible for renewable energy.
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Trump’s Attack On Renewable Energy 19.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Fossil fuels have long been subsidized by tax policies, such as the oil depletion allowance, and by infrastructure construction, such as the interstate highway system. In light of these long-standing subsidies, it’s always a little ironic when fossil fuel industry advocates complain about tax expenditures and other subsidies promoting the renewable energy business. In my view, in their time, all of these subsidies played a positive role in the nation’s economic development. The Tennessee Valley Authority and other New Deal programs subsidized rural electrification and brought the modern energy economy to a part of the country that the free market in energy might never have developed. No one seems to argue for the free market when they receive a subsidy, but if a competitor gets an incentive, suddenly the government is dominated by socialists determined to “pick winners.” At this stage in our economic history, the global economy has begun to make the transition to renewable energy. While the Obama ...
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How companies help cut energy emissions by 20 percent 14.6.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
These two factors have caused the largest U.S. utilities, generating 85 percent of the nation's electricity, to sharply reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions.
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11 states sue Trump's DOE over stalled energy-use limits 14.6.2017 AP Business
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- New York, California and nine other states sued the Trump administration Tuesday over its failure to finalize energy-use limits for portable air conditioners and other products....
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EDF Climate Corps still growing strong after 10 years 6.6.2017 GreenBiz.com
The Environmental Defense Fund has placed more than 800 fellows on corporate energy projects since its inception.
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