User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Oil and Gas
Last updated: Oct 01 2020 21:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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High Country News in the ’70s 1.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
The HCN community reflects on the ‘Me Decade.’
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Energy dominance or climate action: Trump, Biden and the fate of public lands 1.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In Grand Junction, Colorado, the presidential election is a choice between two distinct energy futures.
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Amazon, Google, Microsoft and the climate cloud 1.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Amazon, Google, Microsoft and the climate cloud Heather Clancy Thu, 10/01/2020 - 01:30 Despite all they're doing to address climate change with both emissions reduction plans, circular economy innovation and consumer awareness, Amazon, Google and Microsoft have been criticized — rightly so, in my mind — for their close ties to the oil and gas sector . All of them are using their artificial intelligence prowess and analytics power to help companies such as BP, Chevron and ExxonMobil continue exploration and extraction. When I asked Microsoft Chief Environmental Officer Lucas Joppa about this tension last year, he told me that changes won't happen overnight. "Any clear-eyed person recognizes that this happens over time," he said. "We will be relying on fossil fuels for some time." Indeed, the relationship Microsoft disclosed last week with Shell is slightly different. Broadly focused on the fossil fuels company's digital transformation, the applications being built collaboratively by the two companies are ...
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Will a Biden administration be able to reverse Trump’s climate damage? 30.9.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Will a Biden administration be able to reverse Trump’s climate damage? Hannah Murphy Wed, 09/30/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in Rolling Stone  and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. When he talks about the Trump administration, David Doniger likes to say: "Imagine where we’d be if they knew what they were doing." The climate lawyer and senior adviser to the NRDC Action Fund spends his days defending the environment from the U.S. government, and for the past 3.5 years, that’s meant a front-row seat to the Trump administration’s relentless attacks on any regulation that’s meant to slow the  climate crisis .  But it’s also been a window into the hasty, sloppy and legally dubious ways that it's gone about it. "One of the hallmarks of this administration is how incompetently they’re doing this," says Doniger. "It shows up in how slowly they’ve been able to work, and how flimsy their legal ...
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Commercial trucking's future is in the details 8.9.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Commercial trucking's future is in the details Rick Mihelic Tue, 09/08/2020 - 01:45 One downside of a career as an engineer is that you are trained to notice detail. Robert Downey Jr., playing Sherlock Holmes in the 2011 movie "Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows," is asked what he sees. His answer: "Everything. That is my curse." It can make you the invaluable go-to person for information and analyses, and it also can make you the brunt of sarcasm and stereotyping. You are what you are. I had my son snap this photo as we were driving. I thought this one image captured a great deal of salient points I’ve learned after several years of researching medium- and heavy-duty alternatives such as battery electric, fuel cell electric and a variety of hybrid systems for the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE). Let’s start with the obvious first: Feeding North America requires trucks and truck drivers. Trucks require energy. This energy has to be replenished regularly. COVID-19’s impact on the North ...
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Federal boots on city streets 26.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
With Congress gridlocked and courts restrained, public opinion confronts authoritarian tactics.
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Who’s minding Montana’s abandoned oil and gas wells? 21.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Left-behind extraction wells pollute after drilling and pumping stops. One foundation gets proactive.
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Could Bloom fuel cells be a solution for maritime emissions issues? 18.8.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Could Bloom fuel cells be a solution for maritime emissions issues? Zac Estrada Tue, 08/18/2020 - 01:00 In the race to drastically cut emissions in shipping, one of the industry's biggest names, Samsung Heavy Industries, is teaming with fuel cell company Bloom Energy to develop a more sustainable fuel designed to meet steep international targets. Under the partnership, announced in June, the companies will collaborate on creating fuel cell powertrains for commercial ships, potentially providing one critical path to a clean technology future for marine shipping. The goal is to replace oil-based power generation.  Samsung is one of the largest shipbuilders in South Korea, along with the Hyundai Group and the Daewoo Group, and employs nearly 13,000 people . It's aiming to be the first shipbuilder to deliver a cargo ship for ocean operation that runs entirely on fuel cells powered by natural gas. Currently, an estimated 80 percent of the vessels in the world's shipping fleet operate using bunker fuel. "Bloom ...
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Trump cancels methane regs intended to quell pollution 17.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
As the climate crisis worsens, oil and gas companies can continue to emit the potent greenhouse gas.
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This carbon challenge is bigger than cars, aviation and shipping combined 13.8.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
This carbon challenge is bigger than cars, aviation and shipping combined Adam Aston Thu, 08/13/2020 - 02:15 You may not know it, but you rely on industrial heat every day. It helped make the bricks that hold up your home; the cement underfoot. It forged the steel and glass in your car, and it also cooked the aluminum, plastic and silicon in the very screen on which you may be reading these words.  Industrial heat is essential but largely invisible. To transform basic inputs into stuff we need, manufacturers constantly heat (and cool) minerals, ores and other raw materials to extreme temperatures. And for all the magic of this everyday alchemy, industrial heat poses a growing threat to the climate. The world’s kilns, reactors, chillers and furnaces are powered mostly by fossil fuels.  High-temperature industrial heat, over 932 degrees F, poses a particular challenge because that’s the point at which fuels beyond electricity become the mainstay. Overall, industrial thermal energy accounts for about a ...
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2020: Fossil fuels are dead, long live the sun 13.8.2020 GreenBiz.com
2020: Fossil fuels are dead, long live the sun Hunter Lovins Thu, 08/13/2020 - 00:15 We’re female entrepreneurs and environmentalists. We’ve spent decades promoting clean energy technologies. In this strangest of all years, as the death toll mounts from a disease caused by human incursions into once intact ecosystems, we’re observing another death — the demise of fossil fuels. Is that possible? Consider this: In April, Royal Dutch Shell, one of the largest companies in the world, announced its intent to become a net-zero carbon company by 2050. When oil and gas companies say that they’re getting out of oil and gas, shouldn’t you? No doubt Shell is counting on some miracle like carbon capture to preserve its adherence to a century-old business model of selling oil. And who could blame it? For years, extracting the black gold from the ground, processing it, then selling gasoline, fuel oil, petrochemicals and other refined products has been one of the most profitable businesses in history. In 2008, Exxon ...
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Sustainable fleets are at an inflection point 12.8.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Sustainable fleets are at an inflection point Katie Fehrenbacher Wed, 08/12/2020 - 00:15 Companies and cities are increasingly adopting lower-carbon fleets — including trucks and buses that run off electricity, renewable diesel and renewable natural gas — according to a new report from the research team at Gladstein, Neandross and Associates (GNA).  It's still early days for many of these markets, and sustainability goals remain one of the top drivers for fleets to buy these vehicles. But the metrics that fleet managers care about —  total cost of ownership  — are becoming more competitive for these lower-carbon vehicles, the GNA report found. I read the analysis, which also covers diesel efficiency, natural gas and propane, and picked out these points that I thought were particularly interesting: Renewable diesel is winning fans: Fleet managers report satisfaction with the performance of renewable diesel, which can be dropped into diesel trucks and buses and can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 65 ...
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How big oil funds big brother 30.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Some of the largest fossil fuel companies in the nation back police foundations that raise money for weapons, equipment and surveillance technology.
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Is a big win for conservation a blow to climate action? 22.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
As extinction and climate crises loom, the Great American Outdoors Act and recreation industry continue to rely on oil money.
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How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change 20.7.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change Joel Makower Mon, 07/20/2020 - 02:11 Last week, a group of activists, scientists, academics and others issued a report calling for policies and other initiatives to generate prosperity while addressing inequity and the climate crisis. They called it the Blue New Deal. Its focus: an ocean-based blue economy . The problem, these experts said, is that the much-ballyhooed Green New Deal doesn’t adequately address the many environmental and social challenges that lie along the world’s shorelines and into the deep blue: industrial overfishing; coastal flooding; declining biodiversity; plastic waste; irresponsible tourism; unsustainable aquaculture; oil and chemical pollution; invasive species; and a range of other issues, many affecting the lives and livelihoods of coastal communities. Yes, provisions in the Green New Deal address fisheries and fishing communities, but that’s only a drop in the ocean, say blue-economy experts. The Ocean Climate ...
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Trump admin erodes landmark law protecting communities and the environment 17.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
New National Environmental Policy Act rules limit public input and allow federal agencies to ignore climate impacts of infrastructure projects.
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Could trash-to-energy technology feed hydrogen demand? 15.7.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Could trash-to-energy technology feed hydrogen demand? Arlene Karidis Wed, 07/15/2020 - 01:00 One novel spin on emerging hydrogen fuel options is "clean hydrogen" made from trash.  Early pioneers of these hydrogen-from-waste technologies such as Ways2H, SGH2 Energy (SGH2) and Standard Hydrogen say not only are they making carbon-free, energy-rich fuel, their approaches also will divert mountains of trash from landfills and waterways, cutting greenhouse gas emissions.   Green hydrogen — made by splitting water’s hydrogen and oxygen using electricity produced by renewable sources — is a small fish in the "energies pond." Today, more than 95 percent of hydrogen is fossil-based and does not rely on renewables. Other technologies are in the mix, such as battery electric vehicles. Hydrogen from waste is an even smaller fish than hydrogen from renewable energy. There are only a few waste-to-hydrogen projects, most which are in early stages and relatively small scale. Still, there is potential for clean — low- ...
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Let’s incubate the Green Swans hatched by the COVID-19 Black Swan 23.6.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Let’s incubate the Green Swans hatched by the COVID-19 Black Swan Tom Baruch Tue, 06/23/2020 - 01:30 The global COVID-19 pandemic is a historic Black Swan event that offers a Green Swan of opportunities to harvest innovation from 50 years of converging exponential technologies. We are presented with a rare opportunity to invest in new innovations, rebuild our data and power infrastructures and supply chains to restore and strengthen the economy while healing the environment. According to author Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Black Swans are unexpected, hard-to-predict events that result in extreme, unintended consequences. The coronavirus pandemic is a classic Black Swan. Over the past few weeks, we have witnessed countries and states scrambling for personal protective equipment and ventilators. Oil tankers are carrying millions of tons of oil with nowhere to go. Farmers are destroying food and supermarket shelves are missing essential items across the nation. These events, made visible by the COVID-19 virus, ...
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Vulnerable Republicans flip their stance on conservation bill 15.6.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Ahead of the elections, two senators champion the Land and Water Conservation fund, showing the political power of public lands.
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Jordan Cove pipeline moves forward, despite Oregon’s opposition 28.5.2020 High Country News Most Recent
The company insists the pipeline will help Gov. Kate Brown recover economically from COVID-19.
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