User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: Aug 16 2017 17:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The death of 'alternative energy' 16.8.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Remembering the days when that term referred to clean coal and fracking.
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Germany's Transition From Coal to Renewable Energy Offers Lessons for the Rest of the World 14.8.2017 Truthout.com
Seventy-seven-year-old Heinz Spahn -- whose blue eyes are both twinkling and stern -- vividly recalls his younger days. The Zollverein coal mine, where he worked in the area of Essen, Germany, was so clogged with coal dust, he remembers, that people would stir up a black cloud whenever they moved. "It was no pony farm," he says -- using the sardonic German phrase to describe the harsh conditions: The roar of machines was at a constant 110 decibels, and the men were nicknamed waschbar, or "raccoons," for the black smudges that permanently adorned their faces.  Today, the scene at  Zollverein  is very different. Inside the coal washery where Spahn once worked -- the largest building in the Zollverein mining complex -- the air is clean, and its up to 8,000 miners have been replaced by one-and-a-half million tourists annually. The whole complex is now a UNESCO world heritage site: Spahn, who worked here as a fusion welder until the mine shut down on December 23, 1986, is employed as a guide to teach tourists ...
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New Fraud Allegations Emerge at Troubled "Clean Coal" Project As Southern Co. Records Multi-Billion Loss 11.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Southern Co. is accused of fraudulently misrepresenting the prospects for its troubled "clean coal" project in Kemper County, Mississippi in several legal filings this summer. Southern  announced  in late July that it was shuttering the troubled "clean coal" part of Kemper after construction ran years behind schedule and the company spent $7.5 billion on the 582 megawatt power plant -- over $5 billion more than it first projected. In a lawsuit filed Tuesday, Brett Wingo, a former Southern Company engineer,  alleges  he warned the company's top executives that it would not be possible to meet key construction deadlines. Management responded by retaliating against him, the complaint asserts, and Southern continued to assure investors and the public that Kemper's schedule and budget targets would be met, then blamed unpredictable factors like the weather when those goals were missed. Wingo’s claim that Southern misled investors by concealing construction-related problems drew national attention in a front ...
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Debunking the 14 myths about why we should go nuclear 9.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
Awaiting the DOE study on baseload generation, here are the reasons why energy efficiency, grid flexibility and renewables enhance low-cost reliability.
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Wyoming Just Took The Unusual Step Of Turning Down A New Coal Mine 3.8.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Locals describe the Kentucky company behind the first new mine in decades as “arrogant bullies” who “trespassed on people’s private property.”
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Scott Pruitt Must Not Delay Critical Water Toxics Standards For Coal Plants 2.8.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Sierra Club will fight this attempt to delay and weaken these vital clean water protections every step of the way, with every tool at our disposal.
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How Congress Is Cementing Trump's Anti-Climate Orders into Law 1.8.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
These efforts are mostly flying under the radar, but they could short-circuit lawsuits and make it harder to restore environmental protections.
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America's Carbon-Pusher In Chief 31.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The president's only consistent foreign policy position has been promoting the consumption of fossil fuels.
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The US's Carbon-Pusher in Chief: Trump's Fossil-Fueled Foreign Policy 31.7.2017 Truthout.com
Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump models a hard hat during his rally at the Charleston Civic Center on May 5, 2016, in Charleston, West Virginia. It's time to give Trump's snake-oil-style energy salesmanship the attention it deserves. (Photo: Mark Lyons / Getty Images) Who says President Trump doesn't have a coherent foreign policy? Pundits and critics across the political spectrum have chided him for failing to articulate and implement a clear international agenda. Look closely at his overseas endeavors, though, and one all-too-consistent pattern emerges: Donald Trump will do whatever it takes to prolong the reign of fossil fuels by sabotaging efforts to curb carbon emissions and promoting the global consumption of US oil, coal, and natural gas. Whenever he meets with foreign leaders, it seems, his first impulse is to ply them with American fossil fuels. His decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, which obliged this country to reduce its coal consumption and take other steps to ...
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Regenerative Appalachia: Storytelling And Songs Re-Envision Boone, North Carolina 30.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
So, it’s hard to explain what led to the “great crisis.” You see, everyone said it would never happen. A megadrought has
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U.S. Energy Secretary Duped Into Fake Interview With Russian Comedians 26.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Perry also discussed the Paris climate accord and coal exports on the call.
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Citizens Begin Reclaiming Coal Country After Decades of Corporate Land Grabs 23.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Kayford Mountain, destroyed by mountaintop removal mining. West Virginia native Larry Gibson's family has owned the land since 1797, yet coal companies moved forward with ravaging it. (Photo: Brennan Cavanaugh / Flickr ) Across central Appalachia, once-thriving mining communities have been ravaged by the collapse of the coal industry and the flight of jobs from the region. For a region that remains rich in natural resources, Appalachia's local governments continue to struggle to fund basic services such as housing, education and roads. One significant factor in the region's decline is the land. Since the coal industry began its decline, and even beforehand, millions of acres have essentially been removed from the region's economic production and tax rolls, and nothing has replaced them. Part of the answer to a post-coal economy may lie with an old land ownership study. "Land is the most important thing to us, yet it's not clear at all who owns it," says Karen Rignall, assistant professor of community and ...
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Distributed solar beats coal on cost for co-ops 18.7.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Market responses show rural electric co-ops and municipal utilities can save up to 30 percent of power costs with solar.
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The costs of coal storage and its impact on disadvantaged communities 14.7.2017 Environmental News Network
While the negative health and environmental effects of mining and burning coal are well documented, simply transporting and storing coal can also adversely affect the health outcomes of individuals living near coal-fired power plants.
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Cities And States Take The Lead With New Paris Agreement Pledge 12.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Good news and real leadership are here, just when we need them most, as a massive trillion-ton iceberg breaks away from the
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Dirty. Expensive. Unnecessary. 12.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This column was co-written by Louie Miller, director of Sierra Club Mississippi. These three truths became well known to
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Tesla's big battery will change power and politics 10.7.2017 TreeHugger
It puts paid to arguments for coal fired base load.
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Dear Mr. Bloomberg: Climate Hope To Climate Resistance 7.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Dear Michael Bloomberg, Climate hope is refreshed from time to time with actions of climate resistance. While viewers across
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These Companies Plan to Expand Coal Power Worldwide by 43 Percent 5.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In Paris in 2015,  more than 195 nations  committed to slowing the rise of global warming to less than 3.6°F (2°C). In 2016, renewable energy saw  unprecedented growth  around the world.  Yet in 2017, more than 120 companies have plans to build new coal-fired power plants (or expand existing ones), increasing coal capacity by roughly 43 percent across the globe. That's more than 840,000 megawatts (MW) of additional coal power.  Some of those expansions are slated to occur in countries that don't yet have any coal power, including Egypt and Malawi, likely locking them into at least 40 years of polluting infrastructure. This is  according to an analysis  just released by the German environmental nonprofit  Urgewald , which states that if all of these coal expansion plans go ahead, the resulting average rise in global temperatures would be a blazing 7.2°F (4°C). "This report needs to be a grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-shake-you-out-of-bed type wake-up call for investors, policymakers, and activists all over ...
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Climate And The G20 Summit: Some Progress In Greening Economies, But More Needs To Be Done 4.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Niklas Höhne, Wageningen University; Andrew Marquard, University of Cape Town, and William Wills, Federal University of Rio
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