User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: Jul 06 2015 20:03 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Greece's economic problems linked to its coal-based energy policies 4.7.2015 Environmental News Network
As Greece prepares for its referendum, Takis Grigoriou takes Greece to task for its highly polluting lignite power sector, its ditching of a successful solar program in favour of more coal, the minimal insulation in its buildings that locks in high fuel bills, and Syriza's failure to tackle these issues. The good news? Greece's latest €1.4bn coal project looks like going unfunded.Instead of phasing out lignite Greece opted to engage in a long battle to preserve the ailing industry while putting an abrupt end to solar energy development by blocking new applications.
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Court sides with industry on power plant emissions 1.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Supreme Court decision is a setback to one of the biggest environmental actions of the Obama administration.
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You, Too, Can Buy a Congressman! 1.7.2015 Truthout.com
Montana Rep. Ryan Zinke introduced a rider to the House budget bill blocking a rule that would have cost fossil-fuel companies millions - after receiving at least $43,000 from those companies in campaign contributions. (Photo: US Congress )Ever wonder what the best investment you can make is? I'm not in the business of giving financial advice - but I wanted to share with you this secret that every billionaire and large corporation in this country knows. The best investment you can make isn't gold or some revolutionary technology. The best investment you can make is to buy a politician! Investing in a politician can yield more returns than any stock or other commodity ever could. See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. Take the case of what Montana's fossil-fuel companies invested in Representative Ryan Zinke. If the Obama administration closes a massive tax loophole that allows the companies to rip off the state, Montana's coal companies would be looking at a $19 million hit to ...
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World Leaders Moving Away from Coal, Fossil Fuels 1.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
June has proved to be a great month for the climate, as countries around the world tackle the dangers of fossil fuels head on. Perhaps the action getting the most attention was the announcement earlier this month from G7 leaders that they will phase out fossil fuels by the end of the century. While the details remain unclear, the commitment from the U.S., Canada, Germany, France, the UK, Japan, and Italy is an important sign that the G7 countries are prepared to take responsibility as we move toward the climate negotiations in Paris later this year. While all fossil fuels are feeling the pressure of a carbon constrained world, coal is most clearly feeling the heat. A recent POLITICO article highlighted coal's demise in the United States, drawing particular attention to the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal campaign which has led to the retirement of 195 coal plants in the United States. The market value of publicly traded coal companies fell by 50 percent in less than a year. The industry is facing pressure from ...
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The Aesthetics of Environmental Equity 30.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Which is more "visually awful"? The Aussies don't like the look of wind energy, it seems. A few weeks ago, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott called wind farms "visually awful," and last year the country's Treasurer described them as "appalling" and "utterly offensive." Over the past year, Australian investment in renewable energy reportedly has dropped by 90 percent , and Abbot says his government is working hard both to reduce the number of wind farms and increase the number of coal mines . What's going on Down Under? An island country with enormous amounts of open space, Australia is perfect for wind energy. The benefits are clear, according to the US Department of Energy (DOE): it's clean, inexhaustible, and affordable (equivalent to natural gas), and unlike most electric power plants, it doesn't require water. Converting the U.S. to 20 percent wind power would save 4 trillion gallons of water a year. Finally, it can help create both jobs and energy security. Opponents say that wind farms harm the ...
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Meet the Lawyers Who Pushed the Supreme Court to Block Toxic Power Plant Rules 30.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the last announced decision of its term, the U.S. Supreme Court today, by a 5-4 vote and an opinion by Justice Antonin Scalia, struck down the Environmental Protection Agency's carefully crafted rules to limit the emission of mercury and other toxic pollutants from oil and coal power plants. Justice Scalia concluded that the EPA failed to meet its duty to consider the financial costs of the regulations. But as Justice Elana Kagan documented in her dissent for four justices, Scalia's opinion failed to acknowledge that the agency did in fact repeatedly consider costs and essentially substituted five justices' expertise for that of the agency, in violation of long-standing precedents. Kagan noted that the EPA found that benefits of the rule included 11,000 fewer premature deaths per year, along with many more avoided illnesses. A brief filed by a group of nonprofit organizations that intervened in the case -- including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Lung Association, the NAACP, the ...
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Without Climate Protections, the Ex-Im Bank Shouldn't Continue 30.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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US Supreme Court Backs Coal Profits Over Public Health 29.6.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Supreme Court Ties EPA's Hands, Forbidding Emissions Rules 29.6.2015 Truthout.com
    Emissions from a coal-fired power plant drift skyward in Ghent, Kentucky, June 2, 2014. The Supreme Court on June 29, 2015, blocked one of the Obama administration's most ambitious environmental initiatives, one meant to limit emissions of mercury and other toxic pollutants from coal-fired power plants. (Luke Sharrett/The New York Times) Do you want media that's accountable to YOU, not to corporate sponsors? Help publish journalism with real integrity and independence - click here to donate to Truthout! Given that 2015 is already on a trajectory to become the hottest year on record, and recent studies revealed the "imminent" collapse of the Larsen B and Larsen C ice sheets in Antarctica, today's US Supreme Court ruling against Environmental Protection Agency pollution rules for power plants is alarming, to say the least. The pace of human-caused climate disruption is accelerating by the day. One would think that, if those in power had any hope of mitigating the impacts of our super-saturation of the ...
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Supreme Court Decision Threatens Public Health, Won’t Revive Big Coal 29.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Supreme Court Mercury Decision Threatens Public Health, But Won't Revive Big Coal 29.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today's ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court to send the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard (MATS) back to EPA for further proceedings is a decision that endangers public health, but it won't revive the fortunes of Big Coal. These standards were designed to safeguard local communities against dangerous pollution from power plants. Unfortunately, today millions of Americans won't yet be able to breathe more easily. Practically speaking, today's decision won't revive the fortunes of Big Coal or slow down our nation's transition to clean energy. Most utilities have long since made decisions about how to meet the standard, since the compliance deadline was April 2015. Only a few dozen coal plants are still operating today with no pollution controls for mercury and air toxics and no clear plans to install them. The headwinds for coal just won't be reversed by this decision. Facing ever-tougher grassroots opposition and competition in the marketplace, coal fell from its perch as our number one source of energy this ...
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No, Coal is NOT the Fix-All Solution to Energy Poverty 27.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pope Francis' papal encyclical on climate change and the environment, titled " On the Care of Our Common Home ", was released last Thursday, recognizing climate change as a moral issue (the poor will suffer the most from a changing climate), while also calling on political leaders to replace fossil fuels with less-polluting sources of energy. The encyclical endorses the science that says climate change is human-caused, resulting from coal, oil, and natural gas use, and also states that humanity is failing in "its God-given role to be a responsible steward of Earth," while time is running out to fix the problem. Papal encyclicals are one of the highest forms of papal teaching, expected to be taken very seriously by Catholics. In what is a victory for climate hawks (the encyclical is basically a call to action targeted at the Vatican's bishops around the world), the encyclical provided a new target for conservatives in the U.S. and elsewhere; conservative media in the U.S. came up with all types of ...
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Google to transform carcass of Alabama coal power plant into clean-powered datacenter 26.6.2015 TreeHugger
Using the bones of old-world infrastructure to build new-world infrastructure.
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Coal Plant That Advocates Worked to Retire Will Become Clean-Powered Google Data Center 26.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Google announced this week that it will be opening its newest data center -- which will be 100 percent powered by renewable energy -- at the site of a soon-to-be retired Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal plant in Alabama that is being phased out thanks to the advocacy of Sierra Club and many others. It's one of the most powerful, inspiring examples yet of the energy transformation that we're driving all across this nation, and if done right, it could also provide an economic boost for Widows Creek workers and the local community. "It's exciting to see Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) working with the state and regional economic agencies to repurpose this old, polluting coal plant in a way that will jumpstart green industry growth, renewable power, and job creation in Alabama," said Jonathan Levenshus, a senior Beyond Coal campaign representative in the region. This is especially timely, as news is just breaking today that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Alabama Power have reached an ...
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Fracking helping utilities reduce reliance on coal 23.6.2015 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
When you flip on a light switch, odds are, you're burning coal. But as the fracking boom continues to unleash huge quantities of natural gas, the nation's electric grid is changing. Power plants are increasingly turning to this low-cost, cleaner-burning fossil fuel.Bill Pentak stands in the middle of a construction site, looking up at his company's latest project towering overhead — a new natural gas power plant."This plant was sited precisely where it is because of its access to the abundant, high-quality natural gas that's found a mile to two miles beneath our feet," he says.
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China's Communist-Capitalist Ecological Apocalypse 21.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
331 394 *Projected Chinese consumption in 2035 is calculated assuming per-capita consumption will be equal to the current US level, based on projected GDP growth of 8 percent annually. Latest year figures for grain, oil, coal, fertilizer and paper are from 2008. Latest year figures for meat and steel are from 2010. Source: Earth Policy Institute, 2011 How can this happen? What would the rest of the world live on? Already, as resource analyst Michael Klare reviews in his latest book, The Race for What's Left (2012), around the world existing reserves of oil, minerals and other resources "are being depleted at a terrifying pace and will be largely exhausted in the not-too-distant future." B. Airpocalypse Now Decades of coal-powered industrialization combined with the government-promoted car craze since the 1990s have brought China the worst air pollution in the world. Scientists have compared north China's toxic smog to a "nuclear winter" and the smog is also sharply reducing crop yields. Lung cancer is ...
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Manchin: Pope's Call For Climate Action Is Fine, But Getting Rid Of Fossil Fuels Is Unrealistic 19.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), a coal state Catholic, on Thursday argued in response to the pope's encyclical on climate change for more investment in technologies to cut coal emissions. Manchin said in a statement that while he believes climate change is real and humans are contributing to it, fossil fuels will likely continue to provide a significant share of energy. “I have said repeatedly that I believe climate change is real, and that the more than 7 billion people living on this Earth have contributed to its warming," Manchin said. "I also believe, like Pope Francis, that we must work together to help solve this problem by investing in the technologies of the future that will help provide reliable, affordable and clean energy to citizens around the world. But the fact is our own U.S. Department of Energy believes that we will get more than thirty percent of our electricity from coal for the next quarter century." Pope Francis's encyclical calls for "a new dialogue about how we are ...
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Pope Francis' Encyclical: Clean Energy and the Moral Case for Climate Solutions 18.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, Pope Francis officially released his encyclical, " Laudato Si (“Be Praised”), On the Care of Our Common Home ”, calling on “every person living on this planet” to urgently address climate change, reduce the use of fossil fuels, and transition to clean energy.   An encyclical is a message sent to all the Bishops of the Roman Catholic Church to help inform Catholic teachings. But, Pope Francis made clear that this message is for “all men and women of good will” to “cooperate as instruments of God for the care of creation, each according to his or her own culture, experience, involvements and talents.” The Pope cited climate change as a moral crisis we must address to protect the world’s poor from the impacts of climate change such as rising seas, drought, and floods. The Pope acknowledged that the “bulk of global warming” is caused by human activity and issued a call for our global society to rapidly address this crisis by reducing and ultimately eliminating the use of fossil fuels. In order to ...
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Pope Francis on the Way to Paris: Revoking King Coal & Big Oil's License to Pollute 18.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The coal and oil industry monopoly on power is crumbling before our eyes. The biggest change in 2015 is that these industries' carte blanche license to pollute -- and to disrupt climate solutions -- is looking increasingly precarious. In June alone Pope Francis, the G7, and Norway have all taken major steps to revoke the power of coal and oil as we head towards the UN climate meeting in Paris. On November 30 representatives of the world's governments will gather in Paris for their annual attempt at a legally binding climate treaty. And despite 21 years of disappointments and near misses, I see reason for great optimism that the world's 193-nations might just agree to meaningful, measurable reductions of carbon pollution. Inevitability. Last week the G7 revoked the permanence and inevitability card that the coal and oil industries (which includes natural gas) rely on for unquestioned support from the world's governments. On June 8 the Group of Seven, the leaders of the world's leading industrialized ...
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Inside the Power Plant Fueling the US Drought 17.6.2015 Truthout.com
(Photo: Michael Friberg / ProPublica) A couple of miles outside the town of Page, three 775-foot-tall caramel-colored smokestacks tower like sentries on the edge of northern Arizona’s sprawling red sandstone wilderness. At their base, the Navajo Generating Station, the West’s largest power-generating facility, thrums ceaselessly, like a beating heart. Football-field-length conveyors constantly feed it piles of coal, hauled 78 miles by train from where huge shovels and mining equipment scraped it out of the ground shortly before. Then, like a medieval mortar and pestle machine, wheels crush the stone against a large bowl into a smooth powder that is sprayed into tremendous furnaces — some of the largest ever built. Those furnaces are stoked to 2,000 degrees, heating tubes of steam to produce enough pressure to drive an 80-ton rod of steel to spin faster than the speed of sound, converting the heat of the fires into electricity. The power generated enables a modern wonder. It drives a set of pumps 325 ...
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