User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: Sep 20 2016 22:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Bank Of America Touts Going Green But Funnels Billions Into Fossil Fuels 20.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK ― Bank of America said Monday it will power 100 percent of its operations with clean energy in the next four years, making it the latest big bank promising to aggressively shrink its carbon footprint. But until the country’s second-largest bank by assets stops funneling money to dirty fossil fuel projects, such commitments amount to little more than fig leaves at best, and manipulative “ greenwashing ” at worst, environmentalist groups said.  To pull it off its new commitment, Bank of America plans to cut back on electricity use and buy more renewable energy and carbon offsets, credits voluntarily purchased by companies to counterbalance pollution. As part of the announcement Monday, Bank of America also said it had joined the RE100, a coalition ― led by the nonprofit Climate Group ― of big corporations committed to becoming completely carbon neutral . “Addressing global issues like climate change and the transition to a sustainable and low-carbon future takes collaboration, innovation and ...
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Big Bank 'Greenwashing' Exposed as Major Climate Week Sponsors Fund Fossil Fuels 20.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

Big bank sponsorship of Climate Week 2016, which kicked off Monday in New York City, "amounts to little more than greenwashing," according one environmental organization, given financial institutions' business-as-usual investment in fossil fuels.

Indeed, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) charges three major sponsors—Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, and Bank of the West (BNP Paribas)—with "helping [to] drive the climate crisis" through their ongoing funding of extreme fossil fuels such as coal and tar sands oil. 

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Breaking the Climate Procrastination Habit: How to Bring on America the Sustainable 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Emily Schwartz Greco

President Barack Obama calls climate change the greatest “threat to future generations.” To do something about it, he raised fuel-efficiency standards, launched his currently stalled Clean Power Plan, and tucked

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Banks Sponsoring ‘Climate Week NYC’ Responsible for Investing Billions in Extreme Fossil Fuels 20.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

As ‘Climate Week NYC’ kicks off today, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) questions the climate integrity of three major event sponsors. RAN research shows that these sponsors, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, and Bank of the West (BNP Paribas)  are helping drive the climate crisis by pumping hundreds of billions of dollars into extreme fossil fuels.

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Power Plan Foes from Mars, Backers from Venus (Earth Actually) 18.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In less than two weeks, nine judges on the Court of Appeals in Washington will hear arguments over the Clean Power Plan, the centerpiece of this country’s action on climate change.  At stake are limits on the nation’s biggest single source of dangerous carbon pollution – some 1500 coal and gas fired power plants that together emit nearly two billion tons per year of carbon dioxide.  That’s more than a third of U.S. climate-changing pollution and almost three times the pollution from the next ten industrial source categories combined. The first thing that might strike a neutral observer when reading the briefs is that the two sides are coming from completely different planets.  They are presenting such starkly different factual pictures.  To be sure, the Clean Power Plan’s supporters feel the fierce urgency of acting on climate change.  The climate deniers and big polluters on the others side, not so much. But that is not the main difference I want to emphasize here.  At the heart of their case the Clean ...
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Donald Trump Could Slow Clean Energy's Hard-Won Progress 17.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On the face of it, a Donald Trump presidency would not be good for the renewable energy industry. The infamously fact - averse Republican nominee has called climate change a “hoax” invented “by the Chinese.” He has pledged to revive  the coal industry, dismantle the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and renege on commitments to the historic climate accord reached in Paris last year. He has complained that wind turbines are “killing all of the eagles,” and says solar power is “not working so good,” in part because it’s “very, very expensive.” Yet SolarCity CEO Lyndon Rive says he doesn’t fear the prospect of a Trump victory in November. “It may slow down the advancement of our goal to accelerate clean energy,” Rive, whose company is the largest solar installer in the country, told The Huffington Post on Tuesday. “Unfortunately, one party may champion solar more than the other.” But away from the spotlight of a bitter election, the partisan divide disappears, he said.  “It’s not that way when you speak ...
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Will Trumpism, Brexit and Geopolitical Exceptionalism Sink the Planet? 15.9.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and Coast Guard swimmers test the integrity of a melt pond on sea ice in the Chukchi Sea on July 9, 2010, before drilling holes through which instruments can be deployed to collect data. (Photo: NASA ) In a year of record-setting heat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and fast-rising sea levels, ratification of the December 2015 Paris climate summit agreement -- already endorsed by most nations -- should be a complete no-brainer. That it isn't tells you a great deal about our world. Global geopolitics and the possible rightward lurch of many countries (including a potential deal-breaking election in the United States that could put a climate denier in the White House) spell bad news for the fate of the Earth. It's worth exploring how this might come to be. The delegates to that 2015 climate summit were in general accord about the science of climate change and the need to cap global warming at 1.5 to 2.0 degrees Celsius (or 2.6 to 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) ...
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Will Trumpism, Brexit, and Geopolitical Exceptionalism Sink the Planet? 15.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Michael T. Klare

In a year of record-settingheat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and

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Will Trumpism, Brexit, And Geopolitical Exceptionalism Sink The Planet? 15.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com In a year of record-setting heat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and fast-rising sea levels, ratification of the December 2015 Paris climate summit agreement -- already endorsed by most nations -- should be a complete no-brainer.  That it isn't tells you a great deal about our world.  Global geopolitics and the possible rightward lurch of many countries (including a potential deal-breaking election in the United States that could put a climate denier in the White House) spell bad news for the fate of the Earth. It’s worth exploring how this might come to be. The delegates to that 2015 climate summit were in general accord about the science of climate change and the need to cap global warming at 1.5 to 2.0 degrees Celsius (or 2.6 to 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) before a planetary catastrophe ensues.  They disagreed, however, about much else. Some key countries were in outright conflict with other states (Russia with Ukraine, for example) ...
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Watching the Power Market Overrun both Coal and EPA 9.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I'm here to debate (along with Jody Freeman, the Archibald Cox Professor of Law at Harvard) a couple of coal advocates from Texas on the topic, "Has EPA Gone too Far" with its Clean Power Plan. Our opponents are Charles McConnell, who was Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Fuels in the first Obama Administration, and Michael Nasi, who leads the pro-coal Balanced Energy for Texas Coalition, comprised of coal companies, railroads and coal invested utilities and co-ops. Intelligence Squared, which hosts the debate (watch  http://www.intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/climate-change-epa-has-gone-overboard here)  uses Oxford Union rules, which means the side which changes the most minds wins. Since most of the audience will probably start out supporting the Clean Power Plan, we're actually the underdog - we won't have as many people to move to our side as McConnell and Nasi. Based on their previous articles and testimony, we expect the focus to be on cost - somehow replacing coal with clean energy is ...
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"Rolling Coal": The grownup equivalent of soiling your pants 8.9.2016 TreeHugger
There's childish fun. There's provocative rebellion. And then there's just degenerative behavior.
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King Coal Is Dethroned in the US -- and That's Good News for the Environment 6.9.2016 Truthout.com
This is the worst year in decades for US coal. During the first six months of 2016, US coal production was  down a staggering 28 percent compared to 2015, and down 33 percent compared to 2014 . For the first time ever, natural gas  overtook coal  as the top source of US electricity generation last year and remains that way. Over the past five years, Appalachian coal production has been  cut in half  and many coal-burning power plants have  been retired . This is a remarkable decline. From its peak in 2008, US coal production has declined by 500 million tons per year -- that's 3,000 fewer pounds of coal per year for each man, woman and child in the United States. A typical 60-foot train car holds  100 tons  of coal, so the decline is the equivalent of five million fewer train cars each year, enough to go twice around the earth. This dramatic change has meant  tens of thousands  of lost coal jobs, raising many difficult social and  policy questions  for coal communities. But it's an unequivocal benefit for ...
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California nixes funding for coal export terminals 2.9.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Governor’s bill blocks transport to markets in Asia.
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Maine Gov. Paul LePage is Donald Trump's Noxious Canary 1.9.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Pat LaMarche

You’ve heard of the canary used in coal mines to warn of impending hazards to the miners. The canaries were smaller and breathed faster so carbon monoxide and other toxic gases affected them more quickly than the humans and donkeys used to mine coal. Introduced to underground coal mining in the early 20th century, these birds were charged with alerting the miners in time for them to correct the problem or just get the hell out.

 

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Washington Post Editors Caricature Jill Stein As ‘Fairy Tale’ Presidential Candidate 31.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Kevin Gosztola

The Washington Post editorial board held a meeting with Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein on August 25. For a Republican or Democratic presidential nominee, this is standard. For a third-party candidate like Stein, the fact that the Post met with her is quite an accomplishment. However, the editorial board crassly attacked her immediately after the meeting.

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How Billionaire Trump Is Missing Greener Pastures 31.8.2016 Truthout.com
Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a campaign rally in Fountain Hills, Arizona, on March 19, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) Considering how much he brags about his business acumen, shouldn't Donald Trump do a better job of keeping up with economic trends? The "great" America he pines for preceded the advent of today's globalized information age and the automation that rendered  steelmaking a largely worker-free endeavor . Likewise, the Republican presidential nominee's  fossil-fueled ambitions  make no sense in light of what's up with energy and its tremendous labor consequences: The oil, gas and coal industries are heading toward obsolescence as green energy booms. Since Trump enjoys talking about energy industries and their workers, his clueless declarations about them get lots of airtime and ink. Here's one galling example: "The Obama-Clinton administration has blocked and destroyed millions of jobs through their anti-energy regulations," Trump said in a  Detroit speech . "The Obama-Clinton war on ...
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Climate Change This Week: Another Dangerous Pipeline, Solar Community Power Grows, and More! 31.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Saving BUB, Beautiful Unique Biodiversity, like this south American treehopper, is another reason to preserve forests. Credit Robert Oelman Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon OO Amazon Is Burning At Near Record Level - the forest fires, coming on top of recent droughts - raise concerns that 'we're in a different regime.' OO Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough To Save Tropical Ecosystems - made by 178 nations, they won't likely save tropical coral reefs and cloud forests, or prevent mass global extinctions. More is needed. If Only It Worked That Way... deforestation, whether through wildfires or human activities, cuts carbon storage. Credit Hilary Price OO Gabon, Africa: Trading One Dirty Oil Addiction For Another - as the country starts allowing companies to destroy forests and replace them with palm oil plantations. Bad for the planet, and not good for an economy that needs to diversify... beyond oil. When we harm forests, we ...
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A Climate Of Cash In Votes On Global Warming 29.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) has received the most money from the oil and gas and coal mining industries, over $1.6 million since 2010. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) By: Alec Goodwin For years now, the scientific consensus has been that climate change is occurring and is caused mainly by the actions of human beings. So why, during the first month of the current Congress, did nearly half the Senate -- all Republicans -- vote against an amendment stating that human activities contribute significantly to climate change? We don't know. But we can say that those who voted for the amendment received less than one-fifth as much in campaign contributions from the oil and gas and coal  industries as those who voted against it. Senators who have publicly denied that humans have had a significant impact on climate change took in an average of $467,022 more from the coal mining and oil and gas industries since 2010 than those who have publicly accepted humans' role in the global rise in temperature. In connection ...
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A climate of cash in votes on global warming 29.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) has received the most money from the oil & gas and coal mining industries, over $1.6 million since 2010. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) By: Alec Goodwin For years now, the scientific consensus has been that climate change is occurring and is caused mainly by the actions of human beings. So why, during the first month of the current Congress, did nearly half the Senate - all Republicans - vote against an amendment stating that human activities contribute significantly to climate change? We don't know. But we can say that those who voted for the amendment received less than one-fifth as much in campaign contributions from the oil & gas and coal  industries as those who voted against it. Senators who have publicly denied that humans have had a significant impact on climate change took in an average of $467,022 more from the coal mining and oil & gas industries since 2010 than those who have publicly accepted humans' role in the global rise in temperature. In connection with a bill ...
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Latest: Feds warn states against letting mining companies self-bond 25.8.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Three major coal companies have filed for bankruptcy this year.
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