User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: May 24 2016 21:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Coal Financing and Japan: Actions Speak Louder Than Words 24.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This post was co-written with Sarah Lyn Vollmer. The Paris Agreement sends a power signal that governments must shift global resources towards clean energy. One critical component of this effort must be to use scarce public resources to help meet the deep emissions cuts targets outlined in the agreement. In spite of this progress, some countries are still financing international coal projects with public resources. Japan, which will host the 2016 G7 meeting, continues to be the worst offender when it comes to public financing for international coal projects, providing $22 billion from 2007 to 2015. And while most countries show signs of ending their public financing of overseas coal projects, Japan financed $1.4 billion in coal projects in 2015 and is considering nearly $10 billion in future coal projects. The Natural Resources Defense Council, in partnership with Oil Change International, World Wildlife Fund, Kiko Network, Japan Center for a Sustainable Environment and Society, and FoE Japan, released a ...
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Some G7 Countries Still Providing Billions in Financing for Coal Plants - Findings from our new report 24.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This post was co-written with Han Chen and Silvia Peng. The Paris Agreement provides momentum to shift global resources towards low-emission and climate-resilient development. Unfortunately, continued government financing for international coal projects undermines that goal. To address climate change, governments must shift international public finance toward smarter, sustainable options. Japan, which will host the 2016 G7 meeting soon, continues to be the worst offender when it comes to public financing for international coal projects, providing $22 billion from 2007 to 2015. Germany comes in second, providing $9 billion during the same period. Japan not only financed $1.4 billion in coal projects in 2015 but is considering nearly $10 billion in future coal projects. See here for more on Japan . Our analysis - co-written by the NRDC, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Oil Change International (OCI), Kiko Network, Japan Center for a Sustainable Environment and Society (JACSES), and Friends of the Earth ...
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Coal Baron Won't Get Charged For Allegedly Forcing Staff To Support GOP 24.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Despite the fact that Federal Elections Committee staff found "reason to believe" that coal baron Robert Murray and his company violated federal law by "coercing" employees to donate to and support Republican candidates, the FEC will not pursue charges. The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported on the April FEC decision, which was made public last week. The commission's three Republican members voted against pursuing charges, preventing a probe from moving forward. During the 2012 election, Murray Energy workers in Beallsville, Ohio,  said they were required to attend a rally for Mitt Romney. Other staffers later said they were pushed to donate to Romney as well, according to reporting in The New Republic . Murray Energy is the largest coal mining company the country. Murray, its CEO, is a major Republican donor who also gave a tepid endorsement of Donald Trump  at a coal conference on Monday, according to SNL Financial. Murray reportedly said that Trump is" all we got" and would be "the horse to ...
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Cool Japan or Coal Japan? 23.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
With the eyes of the world on Japan for this week's G7 meeting in Ise-Shima, the government will be hoping to show off the best of our country. The town of Ise-Shima itself is home to the one of the most revered Shinto shrines in Japan and a proud part of our history. But the government is also about promoting the nation's cutting-edge art, technology and culture abroad. At the heart of this is - Cool Japan - a PR campaign run by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. But it seems like coal is the new cool, because it's a little known fact that unlike its G7 partners, Japan is in the process of building 49 new coal-fired power stations - whilst also being by far and away the largest financial backer of coal infrastructure in the region. From 2007 to 2014, Japan provided over US$20 billion in coal financing abroad. While the US, the UK, France and other countries have placed restrictions on their financing of coal projects abroad, and are actively shutting down existing plants, Japan ...
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Fossil Fuel Industry-Funded Attorneys General Try to Block ExxonMobil Climate Fraud Probe 20.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
You could call it the battle of the attorneys general: one side representing the public interest, exactly what attorneys general are supposed to do; the other side representing the special interests, exactly what they are not supposed to do. In late March, 17 attorneys general held a press conference to announce they will defend the new federal rule curbing power plant carbon emissions and investigate energy companies that may have misled investors and the public about climate risks. They call themselves AGs United for Clean Power, and so far attorneys general from California, Massachusetts, New York and the Virgin Islands have launched investigations of ExxonMobil, the world's largest publicly traded oil company, for fraud. In response, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange decided to push back. On May 16, they intervened on behalf of ExxonMobil to quash one of the investigations of the Irving, Texas-based company, accusing AGs United for Clean Power of trying to ...
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80 NGOs Ask Japan to End Fossil Fuel Financing by 2017 19.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

In a letter released today in Tokyo, 80 civil society organizations urged Japan to announce a commitment at the G7 summit to end all fossil fuel financing by 2017.

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A clarion call to save the planet is uniting global climate action 19.5.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, May 19, 2016 Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. People are putting their bodies on the line, with blockades, sit-ins, banner-hangs and a whole constellation of confrontational actions, driven by the urgency of the climate ...
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Breaking Free: A Rising Tide of Climate Resistance 19.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Amy Goodman, Denis Moynihan

“Welcome to Fort McMurray. We have the energy,” reads the signs as one enters this northern deep-woods outpost at the center of the Alberta tar sands petroleum-extraction zone. The forests surrounding Fort McMurray are on fire, closing in on the vast tar sands operations. More than 90,000 people have been evacuated, most from Fort McMurray, but thousands more from the oil sands work camps, where what is considered the dirtiest oil on the planet is extracted from tarry sand dug from earth-scarring open-pit mines.

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Report: Coal Execs Pocketed Windfall While Driving Companies Into the Ground 18.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Public Citizen As America’s largest coal producers were driving their coal companies into the ground through bad investments and overproduction, their CEOs pocketed outrageous bonuses while laying off hundreds of workers, according to a new report (PDF) released today by Public Citizen. All told, bonuses and money spent on bankruptcy lawyers by the four companies – Alpha Natural Resources, Arch Coal, Cloud Peak Energy and Peabody Energy – topped out at nearly a quarter of a billion ...
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Climate Change This Week: Sobering Suicides, Battery Breakthrough, and More! 17.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Forests Protect The BUB: Bizarre, Useful and Beautiful biodiversity that sustains all of us, besides storing carbon -- and hooded Indian grasshoppers.Credit Kaushik GM at flickr OO India Is Set To Spend Over $6 Billion On Restoring Their Forests Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon * Boreal Circle of Fire - a wildfire emitted many tons of climate-changing carbon emissions as it burned Fort McMurray, Canada, a city devoted to producing climate-changing fossil fuels that help warm and dry out boreal forests; both fires and fossil fuels up the chances for... more carbon-emitting wildfires. This wildfire is just the latest in a growing lineage of early northern wildfires, indicating climate change. OO The Climate Context For The Fort McMurray Wildfire - Takeaways: warmer winters and springs are heating up the north; the fire season has increased 40% over the past 65 years; El Nino added to the heat and dryness this year. large wildfires ...
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Largest Global Civil Disobedience in the History of the Climate Movement Concludes 17.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Twelve days of worldwide actions from NGOs, local organisations and communities against fossil fuels have just concluded, showing that the climate movement will not rest until all coal, oil and gas is kept in the ground. The combined global efforts on six continents now pose a serious threat to the future of the fossil fuel industry, already weakened by financial and political uncertainty.

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Tens of Thousands Worldwide Take Part in Largest Global Civil Disobedience in the History of the Climate Movement 16.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Twelve days of unprecedented world-wide action against fossil fuels have just concluded, showing that the climate movement will not rest until all coal, oil and gas is kept in the ground. The combined global efforts of activists on six continents now pose a serious threat to the future of the fossil fuel industry, already weakened by financial and political uncertainty.

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What the U.S. can learn from European coal miners’ second act 16.5.2016 Current Issue
Europe and the U.S. have taken different paths in response to climate concerns and coal declines.
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Climate Actions Underway Worldwide for Final Days of Break Free 2016 14.5.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Climate activists are gearing up for the final weekend of a 12-day series of actions against the fossil fuel industry—48 hours that will be taken up by rallies, protests, and civil disobedience actions around the world, organized under the banner "Break Free."

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The Coal vs. Fracking Canard 14.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Mitch Jones

Following a recent report from the Department of Energy that 66 percent of natural gas produced in the United States comes from fracked wells and news that March was the third straight “hottest month ever,” Mother Jones has published a piece – for a second time this year – that argues that fracking for natural gas

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Civil Disobedience is the Only Way Left to Fight Climate Change 14.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Kara Moses

ight now, thousands of people are taking direct action as part of a global wave of protests against the biggest fossil fuel infrastructure projects across the world. We kicked off earlier this month by shutting down the UK’s largest opencast coal mine in south Wales.

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Has China's coal use peaked? Here's how to read the tea leaves 14.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Valerie J. Karplus , MIT Sloan School of Management As the largest emitter of carbon dioxide in the world, how much coal China is burning is of global interest. In March, the country's National Bureau of Statistics said the tonnage of coal has fallen for the second year in the row. Indeed, there are reports that China will stop construction of new plants, as the country grapples with overcapacity, and efforts to phase out inefficient and outdated coal plants are expected to continue. A sustained reduction in coal, the main fuel used to generate electricity in China, will be good news for the local environment and global climate. But it also raises questions: what is driving the drop? And can we expect this nascent trend to continue? It appears many of the forces that led coal use to slow down in recent years are here to stay. Nevertheless, uncertainties abound. The future of coal in China will depend on economic factors, including whether alternatives are cheaper and whether a return to high oil ...
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Break Free from Fossil Fuels for Our Collective Survival 13.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Arianne Kassman

My name is Arianne Kassman. I am a Pacific Climate Warrior from Papua New Guinea. I want to tell you about why it's important for my people, and for the Pacific, that fossil fuels remain in the ground.

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Climate Disobedience and the New "Public Trust" Laws of Nature 12.5.2016 Truthout.com
Under the public trust doctrine, the government has an affirmative duty to protect natural resources that are shared by everybody. As the climate crisis advances, many advocates are suggesting it's time to use the legal doctrine to compel governments to address climate change. Young people involved with the Break Free movement stopped a open cast coal mine from operating for the day during at demonstration at the Ffos-y-fran coal mine in Wales on May 3, 2016. (Photo: Break Free ) If you think there's something odd about the US committing itself to at least a 26 percent reduction in greenhouse gases by 2025 even while federally owned lands produce a quarter of the nation's fossil fuel energy, you just might be a believer in an old legal concept: the public trust doctrine. This ancient idea, applied since Roman days, is pretty straightforward: The government has an affirmative duty to protect natural resources that are shared by everybody. In the past, the doctrine has been used to prevent the selling off ...
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A Victory for Indigenous Rights Over Fossil Fuel Greed 12.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Kelly Mitchell

This is a big deal.

Gateway Pacific was the largest proposed coal export terminal in the United States. If built, coal companies like Peabody Energy and Cloud Peak would have been able to ship up to 48 million tons of coal out of the U.S each year. Once burned, that coal would emit more than 80 million tons of carbon per year, the equivalent of 21 new coal-fired power plants. And transporting all that coal from Wyoming and Montana to Washington would have threatened communities and ecosystems with coal dust, diesel fumes, and derailments.

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