User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Fossil Fuels :: Coal
Last updated: Aug 29 2015 02:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Court Sides With Feds and Coal Firms in Lawsuit Over Federal Coal Leasing Program 29.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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In Kenya, Proposed Coal-Fired Power Plant Threatens World Heritage Site 29.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 2015, only about 23 percent of Kenya's 45,500,000 people have access to electricity, and this problem is particularly pronounced in rural areas of the East African country, where electrification drops to a staggering 4 percent . It's clear that the question is not whether or not something needs to be done -- it is unconscionable to leave people living in energy poverty. Rather, the issue is how do we start delivering energy services as quickly and as broadly as possible? Despite mounting evidence that new coal generation regularly fails to deliver energy access, especially in rural areas, Amu Power is proposing a 1,000 megawatt coal plant in Manda Bay in Lamu County, home to the World Heritage listed Lamu Old Town. Oxfam and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) recently issued a report on energy poverty in sub-Saharan Africa showing that off-grid and mini-grid technologies are better at delivering power than centralized projects like coal plants. These small scale projects, such as home solar ...
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Inhofe's Drought, McConnell's Fire 28.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Families in the West who are trying to salvage what they can from the charred ruins of their homes may want to communicate their grief to the members of Congress who could do something to slow climate change, but won't. Global warming has made the drought, fires and personal losses worse than they otherwise would have been. Weather extremes are no stranger to California, but scientists say the current drought is 15% to 20% more severe because of global warming. They say the odds of extreme droughts there have doubled over the last century. In other words, global warming is injecting steroids into weather disasters. Without countermeasures, it will get much worse. Yet the response among deniers in Congress is to escalate their campaign to sabotage any government effort to reduce the pollution responsible for climate change. They are attempting to undermine not only President Obama's climate action plan, but also hopes for an international agreement at the next global climate conference this December in ...
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EPA Clean Power Plan Attacks Based on Flawed Reports 28.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Consumer Energy Alliance National Mining Association Beacon Hill Institute, “The Economic Effects of the New EPA Rules on the United States” [ Link ] Flaws:  Beacon Hill Institute’s economic analysis of the EPA Clean Power Plan does not actually examine EPA’s draft plan; and did not deny that they fail to address the draft CPP itself. Inflates the cost of the new rules for existing power plants by a factor of two, and minimizes the regulation's benefits by 20 times when compared with the EPA's Regulatory Impact Analysis.  BHI artificially inflates the costs of the Clean Power Plan by excluding from their analysis cost-effective low carbon technologies such as renewable energy and energy efficiency that are allowed for compliance Funded by: A grant passed through a corporate-linked front group run by Richard Berman of Berman & Associates.  Berman is a PR executive who recently boasted at an oil and gas conference that his front groups are intentionally set up to provide “total anonymity” to corporate ...
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Inhofe's Drought; McConnell's Fire 28.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Families in the West who are trying to salvage what they can from the charred ruins of their homes may want to communicate their grief to the members of Congress who could do something to slow climate change, but won't. Global warming has made the drought, fires and personal losses worse than they otherwise would have been. Weather extremes are no stranger to California, but scientists say the current drought is 15% to 20% more severe because of global warming. They say the odds of extreme droughts there have doubled over the last century. In other words, global warming is injecting steroids into weather disasters. Without countermeasures, it will get much worse. Yet the response among deniers in Congress is to escalate their campaign to sabotage any government effort to reduce the pollution responsible for climate change. They are attempting to undermine not only President Obama's climate action plan, but also hopes for an international agreement at the next global climate conference this December in ...
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The ACT Is a Beacon of Hope in Tony Abbott's Sea of Despair 27.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by Josh Creaser* and Charlie Wood Last weekend, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) made history when its Chief Minister - Andrew Barr - committed to divest the Government's investments in coal, oil and gas companies, making it the first state or territory in Australia to do so, and the 350th worldwide. On the same day, the ACT also became the first Government in Australia to set a 100% renewable energy target. The ACT is no stranger to leadership on climate policy. It also has the most ambitious emissions reductions target in the country and one of the most ambitious in the world. Yet, all of this local climate leadership in the ACT Assembly is incredibly ironic given the climate craziness playing out just a stone's throw up the road at Parliament House. Whilst the Territory sheds fossil fuel companies from its investment portfolio and aims sky-high on solar and wind, up in the House on the Hill, Prime Minister Tony Abbott and his team are busy declaring coal good for humanity. Doggedly, ...
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The Incredible Shrinking Mineral: How It Went from King Coal to Coal Kills 27.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Javier Sierra In just a decade, coal has gone from King Coal to Coal Kills. From fueling development around the world to a dangerous, dirty mineral in steep decline. Coal is a dead man walking because of two fundamental reasons: the revelation of the true cost of its deadly pollution and the booming clean energy economy. Both reasons disproportionately impact the Latino community. According to a study conducted in 2011 by several universities, including Harvard, the annual cost of coal in the US, from extraction to combustion to disposal and storage is up to $500 billion. This includes health, environmental and economic costs, of which the coal industry does not pay a single penny. It drops all those externalities on the rest of us, including you and your family. The Atlantic magazine has just published an article revisiting the study by interviewing one of its authors, Jonathan Buonocore, a Harvard research fellow. The conclusion is that the estimates from four years ago could have fallen ...
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The Corporations Funding the Lawyers to Fight the Clean Power Plan 26.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout combats corporate power by bringing you trustworthy, independent news. Join our mission by making a donation now! Lawyers from coal-dependent states, led by West Virginia, are challenging President Obama's Clean Power Plan . Joining their effort is an army of industry-funded law firms that specialize in fighting the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Together, they will argue that the EPA does not have any authority under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act to issue the carbon regulations; they will also contest the legality of the " fence line " used to set state emission targets. Yet, buried in coverage of the litigation is the fact that the coalition suing the EPA is connected to some of the largest electric utility companies in the country - and many have purposefully kept themselves at arms' length so that their customers never know they are funding lawyers who are working to stop one of  President Obama's main pillars to fight climate change. Policymakers, regulators, and ...
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Protestors Occupy Lignite Coal Mine in Germany 26.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Four months before world governments meet in Paris to negotiate the deal they claim will "save the climate", 1500 protestors took matters into their own hands by entering an opencast lignite mine owned by energy provider RWE in western Germany. With this massive act of civil disobedience on 15th August they successfully blocked four of the mine's five diggers, bringing the destructive machines to a halt for most of the day. Under the slogan "Ende Gelaende", which loosely translates into "this far and no further", the action brought together people from all different kind of backgrounds and countries, old and young, experienced and newcomers, to the world of civil disobedience. They where united by their determination to stop the exploration of an energy source, which is destroying entire landscapes at the same time as being a major driver of climate change in Europe. Extracting and burning lignite and coal is the most CO2-intense way of producing electricity. Even conservative estimations state that in ...
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Australian Capital Territory plans 100% renewables by 2025 25.8.2015 TreeHugger
When individual regions act, entire countries may be forced to follow.
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King Coal Is Dead! 25.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Coal Dethroned 25.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com .  In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountain-top removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can’t quite figure out what it is. He’s pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. ...
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Coal Dethroned 25.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com .  In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountain-top removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can’t quite figure out what it is. He’s pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. ...
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In Appalachia, the Coal Industry Is in Collapse, but the Mountains Aren't Coming Back 25.8.2015 Truthout.com
In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley's all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that's how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. "They're going to blast that one next," he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He's referring to a process known as "mountain-top removal," in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. "And then it'll be just blank space," he adds. "Like the Taylor Swift song." Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can't quite figure out what it is. He's pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. These days, though, it's known to ...
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How the Clean Power Plan is a Game-Changer for Clean Energy 25.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
**Note:** This blog post is part of a series geared toward discussing the wide ranging impacts of the President's Clean Power Plan. Over the course of this week, Sierra Club experts are adding to this series of posts on Sierra Club's Compass blog with more posts on what's new in this plan and its effects on coal , environmental justice , labor , policy , and international climate negotiations (coming soon!). This piece was co-written by Mary Anne Hitt and Liz Perrera, Climate Policy Director at the Sierra Club. The final Clean Power Plan is the most significant single action any President has taken to date to tackle climate disruption. It establishes the first-ever set of national carbon limits on power plants, our biggest source of the pollution that's throwing our climate into chaos. It's also a game-changer for clean energy, because it creates big, important new opportunities for renewable energy and energy efficiency in every state. This post provides an overview of the clean energy elements of the ...
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Here's Why It Matters That China’s Been Emitting Less Carbon Than We Thought -- And Also Why It Doesn't 24.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A team of Harvard researchers recently found, based on new analysis, that China is putting out roughly 14 percent less carbon than previous estimates suggest. The discrepancy comes from a consideration of not just the amount, but the type of coal China burns. The researchers found that China burns a lot of low-quality coal, which emits less CO2. The study marks the first time that coal quality is considered in calculating emissions. In the paper, published in Nature , authors Zhu Liu, Dabo Guan and others explain their methodology: We adopt the ‘apparent-consumption’ approach, which does not depend upon energy consumption data (that previous studies have shown to be not very reliable). Instead, apparent energy consumption is calculated from a mass balance of domestic fuel production, international trade, international fueling, and changes in stocks, data about which are less subject to ‘adjustment’ by reporting bodies and accounting errors… furthermore, this approach allows imported and domestically ...
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China's carbon emissions may be lower than estimated 21.8.2015 Climate Change News - ENN
The IPCC has over-estimated China's emissions since 2000 by 14%, almost 3 gigatonnes of carbon since 2000, while its energy consumption has been 10% higher than realised, writes Eliza Berlage. The country is far more carbon-efficient than we ever knew.
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Picturing the End of Fossil Fuels 21.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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With Ever More Powerful Corporate Lobby, How Can We Hope for any Results from Paris? 21.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Shutting Down a Coal Mine on the Road to Paris 19.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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