User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Renewable Energy :: General
Last updated: May 25 2018 15:27 IST RSS 2.0
 
9,488 to 9,507 of 16,325    
What Are Developing Nations Doing To Fight Climate Change? 22.3.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
AMSTERDAM -- Mongolia says it will erect solar power plants in the frigid Gobi desert. The Central African Republic says it will expand its forests...
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Water Shortages In Middle East Could Mean Further Oil Hikes 22.3.2011 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Water Security Risk Index show more oil producing countries rated 'extreme risk'. The danger is that disruption to water supplies could, in turn, lead to higher oil prices, as high volumes of water are needed in the oil production process. Huge quantities of 'lift water' are often used to force oil from wells with insufficient geological pressure to bring the oil to the surface
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Fruit Tree Tour Draws Massive Crowds for Sustainability (Video) 22.3.2011 TreeHugger
Fruit Tree Tour Draws Massive Crowds for Sustainability (Video)
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Dangers of fracking go beyond poisoned water supplies and earthquakes 22.3.2011 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Hydraulic fracturing or fracking for shale gas is the new wild frontier of the fossil-fuel industry, one they're keen to promote as a low-carbon alternative to high-polluting coal and oil. Environmentalists are worried, though, about contaminated drinking water, and earth tremors - but perhaps those are the least of the dangers.
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Marines going green to save lives on battlefield 22.3.2011 Science / Technology News

The Marine Corps is going green to save lives rather than to save the planet. In a renewable energy strategy revealed to troops Monday, the service said it plans to equip thousands of Marines in Afghanistan with solar-powered gadgets over the next year in an effort to decrease the need to make risky runs for fuel through enemy territory.

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Joel Reynolds: U.S. Nuclear Industry: Not Safe Enough 22.3.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Now, as Japan struggles to contain four out-of-control reactors, all of us -- whatever our views of nuclear energy -- must focus not on assurances that it can't happen here but rather on ensuring it never does.
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Big crowd greets zero emissions plan launch 22.3.2011 Green Left Weekly issue #780
Sun, 20/03/2011 By Kamala Emanuel , Perth Beyond Zero Emissions (BZE) launched its award-winning Zero Carbon Australia 2020 Stationary Energy Plan to a packed meeting at Perth Town Hall on March 14. BZE executive director Matthew Wright outlined the Western Australian aspects of the plan, which was developed to show how Australia could reduce its stationary energy greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2020, using a mix of commercially available renewable energy sources, primarily concentrating solar thermal and wind. read ...
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Tom Weis: Japan's Nuclear Nightmare a Wake-Up Call for US 22.3.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
No energy source is without its impacts, but I have never heard of a catastrophic "solar explosion" or "wind spill." If we learn nothing else from Japan's nuclear nightmare, let it be this: nuclear power is simply not worth the risk.
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Andrew Winston: Does Nuclear Energy Make Sense? 22.3.2011 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Between basic economics, security, national competitiveness (the push to a clean economy creates jobs), the logic for a distributed, non-nuclear, non-fossil-fuel grid and transportation network seems very strong.
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What we can learn from Japan’s nuclear disaster 22.3.2011 Grist Magazine
by Amory Lovins. Cross-posted from the Rocky Mountain Institute . As heroic workers and soldiers strive to save stricken Japan from a new horror—radioactive fallout—some truths known for 40 years bear repeating. An earthquake-and-tsunami zone crowded with 127 million people is an unwise place for 54 reactors. The 1960s design of five Fukushima-I reactors has the smallest safety margin and probably can’t contain 90 percent of meltdowns. The U.S. has six identical and 17 very similar plants. Every currently operating light-water reactor, if deprived of power and cooling water, can melt down. Fukushima had eight-hour battery reserves, but fuel has melted in three reactors. Most U.S. reactors get in trouble after four hours. Some have had shorter blackouts. Much longer ones could happen. Overheated fuel risks hydrogen or steam explosions that damage equipment and contaminate the whole site—so clustering many reactors together (to save money) can make failure at one ...
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Jeff Schweitzer: The Irradiated Elephant in the Room 22.3.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While nuclear energy in an ideal world would be an attractive option, reality is uglier. The problems greatly exceed the benefits. We need to shelve nuclear power as a viable option, and devote our attention to renewables.
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Patrick Takahashi: Renewable Electricity Is Our Only Viable Option: Part 2 22.3.2011 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I still hold long-term hopes for fusion, but my experience working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on laser fusion convinces me that we are at least a generation away before any kind of commercialization will occur.
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Glen Ford: American imperialism is unraveling (part 2) 21.3.2011 AlterNet
An interview by Kathleen Wells, Glen Ford worked as a Network Broadcast Journalist in Washington DC and created in 1977 along with Peter Gamble, America’s Black Forum which was the first nationally syndicated black news interview program on commercial television. America’s Black Forum was quoted weekly by national and international news organizations — a feat no [...] Related Stories ...
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Steven Cohen: The Political Demise of Nuclear Power in the U.S. 21.3.2011 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
While there may be good reasons for nuclear power to be used as a bridge fuel to a renewable energy future, I am confident that...
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Scotland to Build World's Largest Tidal Power Array 21.3.2011 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Ten underwater turbines to lead technology research in exciting project. The Scottish Government has backed a plan to build 10 one-megawatt tidal power turbines in a strait between the small islands of Islay (pronounced ''Isla'') and Jura off the West coast of Scotland. This will be the world's largest tidal power station - which resembles a wind farm, only underwater!
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Boost for green energy projects 21.3.2011 Science / Technology News

Renewable energy and low carbon economy projects in Scotland are to receive a A 6.9 million European funding boost.

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Carbon price could delay real climate action 20.3.2011 Green Left Weekly issue #780
Sun, 20/03/2011 By Jody Betzien The ability of real politics to focus debate is impressive. The climate movement has long debated what policy mechanisms can best combat climate change. Various market based mechanisms, emission trading schemes, regulation and direct government investment have been proposed. The answer is urgently needed. We know there is already too much carbon in the atmosphere to ensure a safe climate. What we do in the next 10 years is crucial. Heading down the wrong track for a couple of years is time wasted. read ...
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Lesson from Japan: We don’t need nuclear power to solve the climate crisis 20.3.2011 Gristmill
by Jon Rynn. Cross-posted from New Deal 2.0 . On March 14, an editorial in The New York Times   stated , “This page has endorsed nuclear power as one tool to head off global warming. We suspect that, when all the evidence is in from Japan, it will remain a valuable tool.” I want to argue that, to the contrary, the lesson to be learned from the catastrophe in Japan is that nuclear power is not even  part  of a sustainable solution to global warming. The whole idea behind preventing global warming is to protect the Earth’s ecosystems, collectively known as the biosphere. You can’t save the biosphere if it’s irradiated. The same problem rears its ugly head with  most biofuels, certainly with corn ethanol ; it won’t matter if the climate isn’t changing if the planet has been turned into one big desert because the soils and fresh water have been destroyed. Speaking of water, the reactors that are melting down were supposed to be ...
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Is thorium the nuclear alternative? 20.3.2011 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Is thorium the safer nuclear fuel option? India's Kakrapar-1 nuclear power plant has been using thorium instead of uranium for some years now. Thorium is a substance that possesses many of the same properties as uranium, but is less fissile. As a result, it's also much safer.
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Is your area solar-ready? Check out this gorgeous map 19.3.2011 The Grist List
by Jess Zimmerman. The places you would go to get some sun aren’t necessarily the places with the most potential for solar energy. The Southwest is a giant hotspot; Florida and Hawaii are only okay. Check out this map to find the solar potential where you live. Read more: ” Good Sun ,” Xcel Energy Related Links: Batteries are not the future of green cars, says smartest guy in room Plug-in Prius not worth it, economically Only bulldozers and bison can save Detroit ...
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