On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-Independent
Category: Renewable Energy :: Wave
Last updated: Jun 15 2018 16:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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This new cooling technology also prevents viral spread 8.10.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This new cooling technology also prevents viral spread Gloria Oladipo Thu, 10/08/2020 - 00:40 In the face of dangerous heat waves this summer, Americans have taken shelter in air-conditioned cooling centers . Normally, that would be a wise choice, but during a pandemic, indoor shelters present new risks. The same air conditioning systems that keep us cool recirculate air around us, potentially spreading the coronavirus. "Air conditioners look like they’re bringing in air from the outside because they go through the window, but it is 100 percent recirculated air," said Forrest Meggers, an assistant professor of architecture at Princeton University. "If you had a system that could cool without being focused solely on cooling air, then you could actually open your windows." Meggers and an international team of researchers have developed a safer way for people to beat the heat — a highly efficient cooling system that doesn’t move air around. Scientists lined door-sized panels with tiny tubes that circulate ...
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Extreme heat is here, and it’s deadly 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Gearing up for the fight against a new climate enemy.
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Why the electric vehicle wave is still coming 29.4.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Buckle up: this year will be rough, but this road trip still looks promising.
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Can a new wave of laser and aerial imagery technologies slash methane emissions? 9.12.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Along Colorado’s Front Range, researchers are working to develop new ways of detecting methane leaks, using everything from lasers to light aircraft to drones. Their technologies could curb a potent contributor to climate change, while saving industry billions of dollars in lost gas.
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Extreme heat is a growing business risk 13.9.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
There are 20 times more deaths caused by rising temperatures than by hurricanes. It's time to design communities with that in mind.
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How many hours-of-safety do our homes have in extreme weather? 15.8.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
How long homes can maintain the last comfortable temperature during extreme weather can make the difference between life and death.
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Why directors are in the crosshairs of corporate climate litigation 15.7.2019 GreenBiz.com
There has been an explosion of climate in the courts launched against fossil-fuel intensive, or “carbon major” corporations.
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Beyond renewables: How timing can reduce corporate emissions 4.6.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
There's another way for corporations to achieve even deeper reductions in their climate emissions footprint.
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Episode 128: Catch Hawaii's decarbonization wave, Hilton thinks local 15.6.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
On this episode, we recap the scene from VERGE Hawaii with perspectives from Governor David Ige, Honolulu's chief resilience and sustainability officer Joshua Stanbro, and Hilton's senior director of corporate responsibility Daniella Foster.
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A wave of electric vehicle charging investment is here 1.6.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
California and New York are moving forward on close to $1 billion, collectively, in EV charging infrastructure.
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Report Report: Carbon accounting, SDG roadmaps, 4th wave environmentalism 17.5.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The latest crop of research and insights for sustainable business professionals.
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Why the Left Has to Stand With Iran's Uprising 4.2.2018 Truthout - All Articles
It takes less than two minutes to support the bold, independent journalism at Truthout. What are you waiting for? Click here to donate now! Which side are you on? The Iranian state or the wave of class and social struggles that have rocked the country in recent months? Donald Trump claimed again in his State of the Union address that he stands with ordinary Iranians in support of democracy. But those words are as hypocritical and false as anything that comes out of his mouth. Trump's "support" is opportunistic -- the result of the Iranian government being the main regional power that rivals US imperialist interests. But Trump's record of sickening Islamophobia and anti-democratic measures shows he is not a genuine ally of the protests. The question should be easier for the left to answer. But unfortunately, it isn't. A section of socialist and radical individuals and organizations has used the specter of US imperialist manipulation of the protests as justification for betraying -- in the name of ...
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Island of Light, Island of Shadow 30.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Your support is crucial to keeping ethical journalism alive! Donate now to keep our writers on the streets, covering the most important issues and beats. "Here's where the hurricane tore off my roof," she pointed upward. We look at exposed wood beams under open sky. "It was horrible," Ruth crossed her arms. "Doors shook. Water came into the house." Her son tugged on her pant leg and she lifted him. "We hid in the bathroom." Patting his head, she leaned on the balcony to study the island. It was like a furious giant had stomped and clawed the town of Utuado, Puerto Rico. Trees were snapped. Power lines, ripped. Mudslides bled over roads. "No electricity. No water. All day to get anything done," she said as she rocked her son. "I don't think it's going to get better anytime soon."  Hurricane Maria The storm fed on heat. Like an angry spirit seeking release, it climbed the sky. Warm. Sluggish. Slow. Hungry for fury. It found more than wind on the ocean. It tasted carbon, the gaseous exhale of ...
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Scientists Warn of "Ecological Armageddon" Amid Waves of Heat and Climate Refugees 30.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A dirt berm is maintained along the coast of Utqiaġvik, the northernmost city in Alaska, in an effort to slow seawater intrusion from increasingly severe Arctic storms. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) Scientists are sounding the alarm of an "ecological Armageddon" as insect populations across Germany collapse, wildfires scorch California and Portugal, record heat waves swelter the US late into fall, and 14 million people become climate refugees annually -- including Indigenous residents of Alaska's northern coast. While most of the world is finally acknowledging the dangers of anthropogenic climate disruption, the White House remains willfully clueless. A dirt berm is maintained along the coast of Utqiaġvik, the northernmost city in Alaska, in an effort to slow seawater intrusion from increasingly severe Arctic storms. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) As the summer Arctic sea ice melts and continues to recede further, the fragile coastline resting atop thawing permafrost is made more vulnerable to the warming waters of the ...
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Nissan reveals 'revolutionary' new wave of EVs 5.10.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Carmaker claims investments in infrastructure and battery advances will "change the way people access and pay for the power in their cars."
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Hidden Dangers Of The Coral Reef Crisis 2.10.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As residents of Florida continue to pick up the pieces after Hurricane Irma, scientists analyzing the hurricane’s stronger
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Generating Terahertz Radiation from Water Makes 'The Impossible, Possible' 29.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Xi-Cheng Zhang has worked for nearly a decade to solve a scientific puzzle that many in the research community believed to be impossible: producing terahertz waves—a form of electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared frequency range—from liquid water.
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Flower-like wave energy turbines could power the coasts of Japan 28.9.2017 TreeHugger
The wave energy generators would help to both generate power and dissipate the power of the waves crashing against the shore.
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A Sustainable Future Powered by Sea 22.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Professor Tsumoru Shintake at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) yearns for a clean future, one that is affordable and powered by sustainable energy. Originally from the high-energy accelerator field, in 2012 he decided to seek new energy resources—wind and solar were being explored in depth, but he moved toward the sea instead.
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Hurricane Harvey, 25,000-Year Storm: Enhanced or Caused by Climate Change? 22.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Members of the South Carolina's Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team (SC-HART) perform rescue operations in Port Arthur, Texas, August 31, 2017. The SC-HART team consists of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the South Carolina Army National Guard with four Soldiers who are partnered with three rescue swimmers from the State Task Force and provide hoist rescue capabilities. Multiple states and agencies nationwide were called to assist citizens impacted by the epic amount of rainfall in Texas and Louisiana from Hurricane Harvey. (Photo: US Air National Guard / Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez) It was a 25,000-year storm. Its area of 24-inch rainfall was 50 to 100 times greater than anything previously recorded in the lower 48. Up to a million cars may have been flooded. In Harris County alone, 136,000 homes were flooded. Yet the official word from academia on Hurricane Harvey was that it "may have been enhanced" by climate change. When are we going start using professional judgement like doctors and engineers use ...
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