User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-National
Category: Education
Last updated: Dec 18 2018 22:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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MPCA denies southern Minn. sow farm permit 18.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency announced Tuesday that his agency would not allow the 4,800-head swine farrowing facility planned near Newburg Township, Minn., to move forward.
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Policy News: December 17, 2018 18.12.2018 EcoTone
The Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award ESA is now accepting applications for its 2019 Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award. Offered each year, this award gives graduate students an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC for science policy training with opportunities to meet with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Visit the ESA website for more ...
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Exhibit PV29: Why this EPA can’t be trusted to forthrightly assess chemical risks under TSCA 14.12.2018 Nanotechnology Notes
Richard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist. I blogged last week about the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) illegal and hypocritical decision to deny the public access to health and safety studies conducted on the first chemical to undergo a risk evaluation under the reformed Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).  In its draft risk evaluation, now […]
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RELEASE: New Study in Nature finds governments and researchers have been underestimating the significance of land and diets to reduce climate change 13.12.2018 WRI Stories
RELEASE: New Study in Nature finds governments and researchers have been underestimating the significance of land and diets to reduce climate change PRINCETON, N.J.— When land shifts from producing corn to soybeans to kumquats, or from cropland to grazing land or bioenergy, or back to forest, does that help or hurt the world’s potential to mitigate climate change? A new paper in the December 13th edition of the journal Nature finds that typical methods used by policymakers and researchers to... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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ESA voices concern about EPA’s effort to weaken the Clean Water Rule 12.12.2018 EcoTone
  Tuesday, December 11, 2018 For Immediate Release Contact: Alison Mize, 202-833-8773 x205, alison@esa.org   The Ecological Society of America is concerned with the proposed rule issued today by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to replace the 2015 Clean Water Rule (Waters of the United States Rule or ...
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Building the business case for fleet electrification 12.12.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored: UPS proves the business case for electrifying commercial fleets.
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The Trump EPA’s latest TSCA gift to the chemical industry is illegal and the height of hypocrisy 5.12.2018 Nanotechnology Notes
Richard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist. ‘Tis the season for giving, but it’s not quite keeping in the spirit to have our Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pile on giveaways to the chemical industry.  The latest one I’ll discuss in this post is not only in direct violation of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); […]
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Elie Wiesel was a teacher above all else, says book author 4.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Most of the world knows Elie Wiesel as a Holocaust survivor, a human rights activist, a confidant of presidents and prime ministers, and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. But Wiesel always saw himself as a teacher, says Wiesel's former teaching assistant who penned a new book based on those teachings.
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How America’s Bluest State Can Be a Model for the Other 49 3.12.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom shakes hands with an election night crowd after he defeated Republican John Cox to become 40th governor of California in Los Angeles.  In the 2018 “blue wave” that flipped the House of Representatives, California flipped the most. Of the  seven target  congressional races in the state, all seven were won by Democrats. Orange County—a key launching pad for the anti-government ideologies of the modern Republican Party—will now be represented in Congress entirely by Democrats. Democrats also won every statewide office and will enjoy super-majorities—sufficient to pass tax legislation—in both state houses. (They’ll hold at least 60 of the 80 Assembly seats and 29 of the 40 in the Senate.) Golden State progressives may be permitted a brief moment – well, maybe a long weekend – of celebration. After all, the state that gave the nation Ronald Reagan, tax-cutting frenzy, and anti-immigrant hysteria now seems to have a Democratic advantage locked-in; even ...
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How can businesses turn SDG aspirations into tangible strategies? 3.12.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
There's often a major gap between companies' intentions and ability to turn their SDG-aligned strategies into concrete actions.
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How the Blue Wave Swelled to a Tsunami in Orange County 30.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File Democratic Representative-elect Katie Porter speaks during an election night event on in Tustin, California.  Ever since California’s Orange County helped power the rise of Barry Goldwater and the Reagan Revolution, political observers have viewed it as the quintessential Republican stronghold.  Such congressional representatives as Dana Rohrabacher and Robert Dornan personified the belligerent far right, the Orange County Register promoted a hard-edged libertarian worldview, and Republican lawmakers such as Christopher Cox, Darrel Issa, and Ed Royce wielded considerable clout on Capitol Hill.      Named for orange groves long vanished, the suburban region south of Los Angeles was known for Disneyland, beautiful beaches, master planned communities, and a powerful conservative business class that exercised national political influence via the Lincoln Club, a high-rolling conservative fundraising group. Republican senators from across the nation made the pilgrimage to Orange ...
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Fast-tracking logging on federal lands may not lessen wildfire risk 29.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
The current version of the Farm Bill includes House-backed provisions that would streamline logging projects on federal land. The administration argues logging could mitigate wildfire risk.
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Dangerous infection tied to hospitals now becoming common outside them 25.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Infections with Clostridium difficile can be difficult to treat and life-threatening. Once a problem seen mainly in health care facilities, the infections are now occurring more often outside of hospitals.
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Ground Level: Education and changes in Eden Prairie 22.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
MPR News recently held a conversation in Eden Prairie to discuss how people feel about their suburban community.
Five reasons for hope on World Fisheries Day 2018 21.11.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Five reasons for hope on World Fisheries Day 2018
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The Revolving Door and the Assault on Community Reinvestment 21.11.2018 American Prospect
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/via AP Images Joseph Otting, Comptroller of the Currency, prepares to testify during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Rayburn Building in Washington.  The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) is a piece of 1977 legislation that requires banks to reinvest in their communities. The Republicans have been gunning for it, and now proposed regulations would weaken it in several key respects. At the heart of this story is the federal regulator of national banks, whose title is U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, a man named Joseph Otting. Conflicts of interest and revolving doors in the Trump administration are such a common story that they barely make news, but this one is worth telling. In his previous job, the CRA nearly cost Otting a $24 million payday.  Congress approved the Community Reinvestment Act in 1977 to combat redlining and other forms of discriminatory lending. Senator William Proxmire, then chair of the Senate Banking Committee, authored the measure amidst ...
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Losing Amazon 21.11.2018 American Prospect
Neil Mitchell/Shutterstock An aerial view of Preston, England Last week, the cities still in the running for Amazon’s HQ2 officially found out the bad news: despite months of effort and billions of dollars in subsidies assembled, they will not be the new home for Amazon’s much ballyhooed second corporate headquarters, now split between two expansions in New York and Arlington, Virginia. This is, of course, how the game was going to go. The corporate attraction strategy behind these failed bids is premised on scarcity: in the end, it’s a zero-sum competition between cities. As the indefatigable researchers at Good Jobs First have amply demonstrated, this competition often turns into a race to the bottom, leading to questionable value for ordinary city residents as subsidies are lavished to bring the next big thing to town. Such reasonable critique is, however, cold comfort for the cities now contemplating their future without Amazon.  But in the North of England, there’s a story to be told that might help ...
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New research sheds light on how to assess coral reef ecosystem health 19.11.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
New research sheds light on how to assess coral reef ecosystem health
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Walmartism and Its Discontents 19.11.2018 American Prospect
Nick Ut/AP Images Efforts to unionize Walmart have made little headway in the face of a problem endemic to the retail sector: high turnover. Discontented workers simpyl quit rather than invest in the hard work of fixing a company's problems.  Working for Respect: Community and Conflict at Walmart By Adam Reich and Peter Bearman Columbia University Press This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Until the “gig economy” and artificial intelligence became their primary preoccupations, observers of the 21st-century workplace were obsessed with the 800-pound gorilla of global retail: Walmart. Infamous for its low wages—so low that many of its workers are eligible for public assistance—and for its intransigent resistance to unionization, this global corporate behemoth was also the target of multiple gender discrimination lawsuits over the years. Although many of its practices are similar to those of other large retailers, Walmart became the poster child ...
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Minnesota's private colleges opening up to community college students 14.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
As the cost of a post-secondary education has grown, some students have found other avenues to a bachelor's degree without taking on large-scale debt.
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