User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-National
Category: Education
Last updated: Jul 23 2017 21:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Citizens Begin Reclaiming Coal Country After Decades of Corporate Land Grabs 23.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Kayford Mountain, destroyed by mountaintop removal mining. West Virginia native Larry Gibson's family has owned the land since 1797, yet coal companies moved forward with ravaging it. (Photo: Brennan Cavanaugh / Flickr ) Across central Appalachia, once-thriving mining communities have been ravaged by the collapse of the coal industry and the flight of jobs from the region. For a region that remains rich in natural resources, Appalachia's local governments continue to struggle to fund basic services such as housing, education and roads. One significant factor in the region's decline is the land. Since the coal industry began its decline, and even beforehand, millions of acres have essentially been removed from the region's economic production and tax rolls, and nothing has replaced them. Part of the answer to a post-coal economy may lie with an old land ownership study. "Land is the most important thing to us, yet it's not clear at all who owns it," says Karen Rignall, assistant professor of community and ...
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Financialization Has Turned the Global Economy Into a House of Cards: An Interview With Gerald Epstein 23.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
To rein in financial instability and other destructive financial practices, we not only must re-regulate finance -- we must develop more public options in finance. (Photo: f11photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus) Finance is inherently destabilizing because it's based on a promise that can be reneged on, or just plain miscalculated, says economist and Amherst professor Gerald Epstein. But the capitalist system that drives modern economies thrives increasingly on debt and quick profits, so when something goes wrong, there's no way to stop the vulnerability from spreading and bringing the economy crashing down. To rein in financial instability and other destructive financial practices, we not only must re-regulate finance -- we must develop more public options in finance. (Photo: f11photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus) This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. Contemporary ...
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West Chester teacher co-chairs national education march 23.7.2017 Philly.com News
Organizers estimated 1,500 people marched in Washington to support public schools, along with those in a dozen other cities.
Letter: Working on the puzzle of climate change 23.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
In early June, more than 1,000 passionate individuals representing nearly every U.S. state descended on Washington, D.C., to gather around the clean energy puzzle. I was among these Citizen Climate Lobby volunteers as we encouraged Congress to enact policy that recognizes carbon fee and dividend as a market-based solution to our changing climate. As a University of Utah student working towards degrees in environmental and sustainability studies and peace and conflict studies, the challenges that...
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Finding the Inspiration to Stand Up for Each Other: An Interview With Sister Aisha al-Adawiya 22.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Sister Aisha al-Adawiya is the founder of Women in Islam, Inc. and a mentor and inspiration to activists of all faiths. As we all struggle on so many fronts with so few resources, our real power lies in coming together and being accountable for each other's lives and wellbeing -- not just as allies but as family, she says. Protesters' signs are left near the White House during the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Mario Tama / Getty Images) Community leader Aisha al-Adawiya (known as Sister Aisha) embodies a life grounded in a profound commitment to pursuing justice, social transformation and deep, meaningful relationships. I met Sister Aisha many years ago during the struggle to save the Khalil Gibran International Academy, the first Arabic-English dual language public school in New York City. I was drawn to Sister Aisha's beautiful energy and spirit and soon realized that many of the women I was organizing with from within Muslim communities looked up to her ...
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DeVos Protests In Denver; House To Make Cuts To Education 22.7.2017 NPR News
More girls are taking the AP computer science exam, House Republicans rejected school choice expansions in Trump's initial budget request, and the education secretary spoke in Denver amid protests.
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The Largest U.S. Latino Advocacy Group Changes Its Name, Sparking Debate 21.7.2017 NPR News
The National Council of La Raza renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind.
Power shift: University of Toronto researcher applies AI to monitor city's electrical grid 21.7.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
From indoor lighting to outdoor street lamps, our world is made brighter by artificial light. But the light that we perceive to be constant, actually fluctuates.A University of Toronto computer scientist and researchers from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology are studying electrical grids for cities, creating a camera that records the city's lights at a slower speed to get more accurate readings of changing voltages at particular locations.
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Study predicts heart cells' response to dwindling oxygen 21.7.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Time is of the essence when treating a patient undergoing a heart attack. Cardiac surgeons attempt to quickly stabilize the heart by applying reperfusion, a technique that restores oxygen to the heart by opening up blocked vessels with balloons and stents. While reperfusion can restore cardiac function, such sudden infusions of oxygen can also further injure severely depleted regions of the heart.“It’s a double-edged sword,” says Anthony McDougal, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering. “The rapid return of oxygen is necessary for the heart to survive, but it could also overwhelm the heart.”
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Mountain glaciers recharge vital aquifers 21.7.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Small mountain glaciers play a big role in recharging vital aquifers and in keeping rivers flowing during the winter, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.The study also suggests that the accelerated melting of mountain glaciers in recent decades may explain a phenomenon that has long puzzled scientists — why Arctic and sub-Arctic rivers have increased their water flow during the winter even without a correlative increase in rain or snowfall.
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’Harry Potter and the Sacred Text’ podcast draws nonbelievers who find meaning in magical fiction 21.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Mark Kennedy grew up a Catholic, and a Harry Potter fanatic. Only one stuck. “I considered myself a nonspiritual person,” he said. He thought he was done with religion. And then he stumbled on the podcast “Harry Potter and the Sacred Text.” The podcast told him that the Harry Potter series — the books that he always turned to for solace when he was angry or stressed or in need of an escape — could be a source of spiritual sustenance. “I feel like I’m born again,” he said. On Tuesday night, Kenne...
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Teachers union leader bashes Betsy DeVos — and DeVos strikes back 21.7.2017 Washington Post
Teachers union leader bashes Betsy DeVos — and DeVos strikes back
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Feds visit Colorado to research marijuana regulation, black market, enforcement 21.7.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
Colorado officials who oversee the state's marijuana agencies are sharing details about a fact-finding visit earlier this week by federal law enforcement and drug policy administrators.
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Cash for carbon: A cost-effective way to reduce deforestation 21.7.2017 Environmental News Network
A new Northwestern University study suggests that paying people to conserve their trees could be a highly cost-effective way to reduce deforestation and carbon emissions and should be a key part of the global strategy to fight climate change.The study, led by Seema Jayachandran, associate professor of economics in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern, sought to evaluate how effective “Payments for Ecosystems” (PES) is at reducing deforestation. PES is a program in which people are given financial rewards for pro-environment behaviors.
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Conservation Groups: After 30 Years of Studies, Get Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion Constructed Quickly 20.7.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
As public scoping meetings begin, groups call on permitting agencies to act swiftly FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (NEW ORLEANS – July 20, 2017) Later today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) will hold its first public scoping meeting to inform development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion, with additional meetings to be held through July 27. During the scoping process, as required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), stakeholders will have an opportunity ...
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Delta Dispatches: Mapping Louisiana 20.7.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Welcome to Delta Dispatches with hosts Simone Maloz & Jacques Hebert. On today’s show Brady Couvillion, Geographer with the Coastal Restoration Assessment Branch of the USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, joins the program to talk with Simone about mapping Louisiana’s coast. He's followed by Dr. Scott Hemmerling, the Director of Human Dimension for The Water Institute of the Gulf, who stops by to talk with Simone about the human dimension of the loss of Louisiana’s wetlands and the ...
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Nesting aids make agricultural fields attractive for bees 20.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Farmers are facing a problem: Honeybees are becoming ever more rare in many places. But a lot of plants can only produce fruits and seeds when their flowers were previously pollinated with pollen from different individuals. So when there are no pollinators around, yields will decrease.
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Say goodbye to x+y: Should community colleges abolish algebra? 20.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Eloy Ortiz Oakley, the chancellor of the California Community Colleges system, wants to kick loose the requirement of algebra for non-STEM majors.
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Want To Slow Global Warming? Researchers Look To Family Planning 20.7.2017 Environmental News Network
We've all heard of ways to reduce our carbon footprint: biking to work, eating less meat, recycling.But there's another way to help the climate. A recent study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the biggest way to reduce climate change is to have fewer children."I knew this was a sensitive topic to bring up," says study co-author Kimberly Nicholas on NPR's Morning Edition. "Certainly it's not my place as a scientist to dictate choices for other people. But I do think it is my place to do the analysis and report it fairly."The study concludes that four high-impact ways to reduce CO2 gas emissions include having fewer children, living without a car, avoiding airplane travel and eating a vegetarian diet.
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Sarah Huckabee Sanders's heard-but-not-seen press briefing, annotated 20.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
One reporter in the room defied White House restrictions and used a smartphone to stream live sound online.
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