User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-Independent
Category: Education
Last updated: Apr 20 2018 21:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Native Language Schools Are Taking Back Education 20.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
The United States Mint and leaders of the Wampanoag Tribe introduced the 2011 Native American $1 coin during a ceremony at Plimoth Plantation on March 25, 2011. (Photo: Jonathan Wiggs / The Boston Globe via Getty Images) For more than 150 years, the Wôpanâak language was silent. With no fluent speakers alive, the language of the Mashpee Wampanoag people existed only in historical documents. It was by all measures extinct. But a recently established language school on the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe's reservation in Massachusetts is working to bring back the language. The threat of extinction that faces the Wôpanâak language is not uncommon for indigenous languages in the United States. Calculated federal policy, not happenstance, led to the destruction of Native American languages such as Wôpanâak. But today, Native language schools are working to change that by revitalizing languages that have been threatened with extinction. In the 19th century, federal policy shifted from a policy of extermination and ...
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Under Louisiana Bill, Peaceful Protesters Could Face 20 Years in Prison 18.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
New Orleans, LA, September 21, 2013, The environmental group 350.org's 'Draw the Line' on Tar Sands and the Keystone XL pipeline protest took the form of a second line parade as it made its way through the french quarter. Under a proposed Louisiana law, peaceful protests against pipeline infrastructural projects bear the possibility of prison sentences as long as 20 years, or fines of up to $10,000. (Photo: Julie Dermansky / Corbis via Getty Images) With House Bill 727, Louisiana has joined a growing number of states that are criminalizing nonviolent civil disobedience actions at "critical infrastructure" sites, which typically include pipelines, refineries and electrical power facilities. Financed by Big Oil, the Louisiana bill makes even discussing a possible trespass action punishable with prison sentences of five years and fines up to $10,000. New Orleans, LA, September 21, 2013, The environmental group 350.org's 'Draw the Line' on Tar Sands and the Keystone XL pipeline protest took the form of a ...
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Why human resources is your sustainability ally 18.4.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Don't overlook the department that's on the frontlines in terms of advancing good jobs and an ethical culture.
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When They Couldn't Afford Internet Service, They Built Their Own 15.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Dwight Roston is drilling on the roof of a home in Detroit's Islandview neighborhood on the city's east side. Roston is part of a team that is setting up a wireless internet connection. The home is just one of 150 designated households in the city to receive free internet service by the end of the year. In 2016, a coalition of media, tech, and community organizations launched the Equitable Internet Initiative, a project that will result in the construction of wireless broadband internet networks across three underserved Detroit neighborhoods. Leading the initiative is the Detroit Community Technology Project, a digital justice project sponsored by  Allied Media Projects . Each network will provide wireless internet service to 50 households per neighborhood, according to Diana Nucera, executive director of DCTP. "During the economic and housing crisis, communities had to fend for themselves," Nucera says. "Media and technology play such a vital role in economic opportunities, but the tech industry doesn't ...
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Zapatista Women Inspire the Fight Against Patriarchy 14.4.2018 Truthout.com
Ready to challenge injustice and spark real change? So are we. Support Truthout's mission today by making a tax-deductible donation. Zapatista women take the stage to deliver their speeches collectively from each Caracol, or administrative center. (Photo: WNV/Shirin Hess) Dawn had only just broken over the mountains. While most of the women and children on the camping grounds were still asleep, others were already wide awake, huddling together in the first rays of sunlight and drinking coffee. To a casual observer, this place might have seemed similar to any mainstream festival campsite. A distinguishing factor, however, was that there wasn't a single man in sight. The sign on the main entrance left no one in doubt that only women and children were welcome at this event: "Men not permitted to enter." Women's participation in Mexico's 25-year-old Zapatista National Liberation Army, or EZLN movement, has represented an incredible organizational achievement since its original uprising in 1994. On ...
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How Trump's Immigration Policies Harm Children 12.4.2018 Truthout.com
The Trump administration has attacked immigrant communities from day one with a range of misguided proposals and executive orders that undermine civil rights and terrify families. These efforts are having devastating effects -- right now, as well as potentially long term -- on the health and well-being of our nation's youngest residents. Documenting the Harm Two new reports  issued by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) examine how the Trump Administration's anti-immigrant rhetoric and policy priorities are wreaking havoc in the lives of young children. Through interviews with more than 100 child care and early education professionals in six states, along with focus groups with dozens of parents, CLASP found pervasive effects of these threats on children. The reports detail disturbing signs and behaviors of distress, as well as serious risks to young children's healthy development. Because of their isolation and fear, immigrant families are reluctant to seek nutrition assistance, health care, ...
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Teachers in Puerto Rico Demand an End to School Closures and Privatization 11.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Efforts to privatize the public schools in Puerto Rico were already under way when Hurricane Maria provided just the impetus the neoliberal establishment was looking for. But educators there are fighting back -- with the support of their peers on the mainland. Ultimately, it's a fight for the future of the working class, say Liza Fournier and Mercedes Martinez, unionized teachers in Puerto Rico. Teachers participate in a one-day strike against the government's privatization drive in public education, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on March 19, 2018. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo / AFP / Getty Images) Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now more than a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators not only about how to resist but also about how to build a better world. ...
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Hospitals Are Leaving Rural America. Rural Americans Are Staying Put. 9.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was originally published by TalkPoverty.org. Kendra Colburn spent a decade uninsured. During those years, she worked as a carpenter near her hometown in rural Vermont, earning just enough that she didn't qualify for low-income health care, but not enough to afford health insurance on her own. While uninsured, she suffered two major work injuries that landed her in the emergency room -- once, a nail shot through three of her fingers, and another time, a piece of wood kicked back on the table saw and sliced her arm. When she was unable to pay the emergency room costs, her credit took a hit for years. Today, Colburn works on her brother's farm and is covered by Medicaid. As a manual laborer, Colburn has developed nerve damage, which flares up in her hands and wrists with overuse. "I cut back my hours to deal with it. I can't afford to not be able to use my hands," she says. "That's how I make all of my money." As a child who grew up in a farming community, Colburn says she observed that pain is ...
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On Embracing Intersectionality and Decolonization to Foment Personal and Societal Change 9.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
For true liberation from all forms of oppression we must first flip the script of identity politics and embrace the concept of intersectionality. To do that, we must begin by examining and deconstructing privilege within each of us, say Ashanti Monts-Treviska co-manager of Cascadia Deaf Nation and Gerry Ebalaroza-Tunnell, a Pacific Indigenous scholar and transformative coach. People listen to speakers during a protest held to draw attention to current social justice issues on the 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 4, 2018, in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can't be found in corporate media! Chip in now by clicking here. In 2018, the term "identity politics" is often associated with the promotion of  tokenized personalities  rather than on the representation and advancement of oppressed communities within society. This form of  identity politics  often revolves around  empty partisan placards  and ...
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Auto Alliance Pushed Climate Denial to Get Trump Admin to Abandon Obama Fuel Efficiency Standards 8.4.2018 Truthout.com
(Photo: LanaElcova / Shutterstock) The Trump administration  officially announced Monday that it will scrap fuel economy and emissions targets  for cars and light-duty trucks sold in the United States and set new weaker standards, effectively undermining one of the federal government's most effective policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. As  the New York Times  and  the Los Angeles Times  anticipated late last week, the two agencies responsible for auto standards -- the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) -- both claimed that their internal reviews have found the Obama-era standards to be too strict, and that the agencies would go back to the drawing board to revise standards for model years 2022-2025.  The weaker standards, expected to be revealed in coming months and reported to be well below the  current targets of 54.5 miles per gallon  (or roughly 35 miles per gallon in real-world driving conditions), will be celebrated as a ...
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Educated Hope in Dark Times: The Challenge of the Educator-Artist as a Public Intellectual 6.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Increasingly, neoliberal regimes across Europe and North America have waged a major assault on critical thinking and the educational spheres in which they take place, but this also applies to creative spaces. Artistic production can change how people view the world, and that pedagogy can be dangerous to the status quo neoliberalism seeks to maintain. (Photo: Hero Images / Getty Images) Truthout doesn't have billionaire underwriters or the endless budget of corporate news studios -- we depend on your support. Click here to donate to independent media! Increasingly, neoliberal regimes across Europe and North America have waged a major assault on critical pedagogy, public pedagogy, and the public spheres in which they take place. For instance, public and higher education are being defunded, turned into accountability factories, and now largely serve as adjuncts of an instrumental logic that mimics the values of the market. But, of course, this is not only true for spaces in which formal schooling takes ...
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The shared city movement is paving the way to a better future 5.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Tom Llewellyn, coordinator of the Sharing Cities Network, discusses how local solutions can tackle global problems.
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Bowheads whales rock- all winter long. 4.4.2018 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
There is a songster we have missed. He sings far beneath the ice in the dark of a polar winter, so maybe it’s about time we listened to the incredible songs that this whale concocts every winter, every month and possibly each day!
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The 3 states of sustainability and how to get back on track 4.4.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The United States may have vacated its leadership position, but that means corporations can find a new direction.
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In praise of ExxonMobil's reporting transparency 3.4.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
What if the largest U.S. oil company published an annual report that integrated sustainability and financial metrics?
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Nations Won't Reach Paris Climate Goal Without Protecting Wildlife and Nature, Warns Report 2.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
A sweeping new report emphasizes just how intertwined the challenges of climate change and loss of biodiversity truly are. The Paris Climate Agreement and several other United Nations (UN) pacts "all depend on the health and vitality of our natural environment in all its diversity and complexity," said Dr. Anne Larigauderie, executive secretary of the UN-backed organization behind the report. "Acting to protect and promote biodiversity is at least as important to achieving these commitments and to human well-being as is the fight against global climate change." The report comes from the efforts of more than 550 scientists in over 100 nations, corralled by an organization often dubbed "the IPCC for biodiversity." Much like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assesses the state of research on global warming and its impacts, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reviews the best-available science on biodiversity and nature's ...
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Imprisoned for Offering Oral Sex: Ill-Founded Laws Criminalize People With HIV 31.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Laws remain on the books in more than 30 states making the possible transmission of HIV a criminal act. (Photo: scottmontreal / Flickr ) Despite enormous scientific and medical advances in the treatment of HIV, stigma around the virus continues to persist. Discrimination against those living with HIV remains pervasive in employment, housing and medical care. And in over 30 states, people with HIV are criminalized to the extent that even the possibility of HIV transmission is punishable by fines and incarceration. Laws remain on the books in more than 30 states making the possible transmission of HIV a criminal act. (Photo: scottmontreal / Flickr ) Support from readers provides Truthout with vital funds to keep investigating what mainstream media won't cover. Fund more stories like this by donating now! Eighteen months ago, in September 2017, the  Centers for Disease Control (CDC) finally recognized reality , posting on their website that "suppressing HIV through antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevents ...
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Ending the war on youth as they march for their lives 29.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Political Action One of the most hopeful uprisings of the Trump era has been the March for Our Lives movement, whose compelling teenager-led platform and brilliant speaking of unfiltered truths is such a refreshing antidote to the traditional dogma that too often stultifies left-wing organizing. Significantly, those eloquent voices who took to international platforms last weekend are also a reminder that, no matter how dreadful the educational/indoctrination system in which they are forced to toil, young people can prove resilient enough to survive a structure designed to reduce them to obedient test-taking automatons. Beneath the calls for gun control that mark this remarkable political moment, there seems to be an underlying rebellion, one that is demanding an end to the war against youth. While the press focuses on issues like "how to keep kids safe in school," perhaps we in the adult world can pause, stop strategizing about how to harness this youthful energy into our own agendas (the typical ...
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In the Age of Trump and "Janus v. AFSCME," Labor Must Rethink Its Organizing Strategies 28.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In a post-Janus world, we must democratize the union and focus on increasing participation by engaging the rank-and-file members, says organizer, scholar and author Jane McAlevey. In this new Gilded Age, creating a crisis in the economic arena is the most effective strategy. A union member holds a sign during a rally outside of San Francisco City Hall on February 26, 2018, in San Francisco, California. (Photo: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images) Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now more than a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators not only about how to resist but also about how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 116th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this one . Today we bring you a conversation with organizer ...
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How startup Coral Vita is making a business case for restoring reefs 28.3.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Its business model includes a role for local farmers, ecotourist operators and developers.
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