On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-Independent
Category: Education
Last updated: Dec 02 2020 03:59 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Divided prospects: The fight over an immigration detention center 1.12.2020 Current Issue
When a private prison company came to Evanston, Wyoming, local officials believed an economic revival was at hand. Instead, it unleashed a bitter debate.
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A helpline connects Indigenous immigrants to crucial COVID-19 information 30.11.2020 Current Issue
For communities who speak Indigenous Mayan languages like Mam, the Oregon program is a vital resource.
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The dust-up over California’s off-road beach 25.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
COVID highlights conflicts over air pollution, crime and accidents on California’s Central Coast.
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Latina community health workers combat COVID-19 in the West 20.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Promotoras de salud work to build trust and improve health outcomes with people on their own turf.
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How Utah cities are pursuing 100% renewable energy 20.11.2020 GreenBiz.com
How Utah cities are pursuing 100% renewable energy Emily Elizabet… Fri, 11/20/2020 - 01:00 In the absence of federal action on climate change in the United States, local communities have taken on the responsibility of reducing their greenhouse emissions. To date, more than 150 cities, counties and states across America have passed resolutions to commit to 100 percent net-renewable electricity in the coming years, defined as meeting the city’s total electricity demand with the gross amount of electricity generated and purchased from renewable sources, such as solar, wind and geothermal as well as energy efficiency, demand management and energy storage. Six cities already have achieved this goal: Kodiak Island, Alaska; Aspen, Colorado; Georgetown, Texas; Greensburg, Kansas; Rock Port, Missouri; and Burlington, Vermont. In Utah, 23 cities and counties have resolved to adopt 100 percent net-renewable electricity by 2030, representing about 37 percent of Utah’s electricity load. How did a politically ...
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Elections in the West highlight divisions and diversity 19.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Justice, power and environment: The 2020 elections were defined by grassroots organizing and deep partisanship.
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Wilderness rescuers brace for a busy winter 11.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Snow is on the way — and amid COVID-19, recovery missions are on the rise.
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Looking for fresh reads? Western authors weigh in. 10.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Here are some books from 2020 you don’t want to miss this winter.
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4 ways businesses can connect with their communities to create a clean economy 6.11.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
4 ways businesses can connect with their communities to create a clean economy Marian Jones Fri, 11/06/2020 - 01:00 Companies often struggle with building community trust as they navigate between profit-making and authentically engaging on climate change and environmental justice matters. Last week at GreenBiz Group’s virtual conference and expo on stimulating the clean economy, VERGE 20 , community leaders and businesses from across the country came together to network, share insights and explore solutions to these challenges. During the panel "Connecting Communities to the Clean Economy," experts shared their experiences working with private companies, their fights for green jobs and why businesses need to think of themselves as part of the community. The talk featured two women of color and leaders within the environmental and economic justice movement: Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE (founded as the United Puerto Rican Organization of Sunset Park); and Rahwa Ghirmatzion, executive ...
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California voted to keep affirmative action ban in place 6.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
It’s a setback, but students have been fighting to diversify their college campuses for years.
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How conservation groups confront distrust from communities of color 29.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In order to attract a broader constituency, organizations must first address a history of missteps and exclusion.
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Why Google, BASF and Sephora are coming together on safer chemistry 28.10.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Why Google, BASF and Sephora are coming together on safer chemistry Elsa Wenzel Wed, 10/28/2020 - 02:02 It's probably fair to say that nobody expressly set out to devise a sunscreen to bleach coral reefs or a yoga mat to emit carcinogens. Yet toxic substances circulate in waterways and bloodstreams, leached out from all the consumables of everyday life. Shortsightedness and paltry data in the cycles of product design and engineering are partly to blame for this collateral damage of modern chemistry. Most product designers are unlettered in chemistry, and the practice of green chemistry remains in its early years. Even a basic count of all the industrial chemicals in use is scarce — somewhere over 80,000 , according to the U.S. Toxic Substances Control Act Inventory, although the EPA total for recent output is less than 9,000 . It's simply asking too much of most people formulating a consumer product only to include ingredients that are proven not to harm living systems. But what if design teams seeking ...
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Brown, female and on the bus: A personal journey into transportation policy 27.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
ZikG Close Authorship These were normalized experiences of being female, brown and a non-driver. And yet, I never sought the safe isolation of being in a car. I could not have explained why, until age 29, I refused to get a license. I had neither the understanding of transportation’s importance or its role in our social fabric to put words to my own stubbornness, until I sank deep into the academic study, personal stories and history of our systems. When I entered grad school at Mills College in 2009, I finally decided to get a license. I realized I could no longer afford to wait for buses that never came, and I had the luxury of being able to drive, have a vehicle and affording my private transportation system. Being in an enclosed vehicle alone was a new experience at 29, and the safety and comfort I felt was matched only by my own sense of disconnection from the world. I’ve heard the term "windshield mentality" used for the psychology of driving, and it resonates deeply. On a train, a bus, a bike or ...
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EPA @ 50, and what it says about you and me 26.10.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
EPA @ 50, and what it says about you and me Terry F. Yosie Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:45 The American people always have possessed a very personal relationship with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Like all personal relationships, the EPA and its public have their share of successes and shortcomings, adjustments of expectations to realities, and recognition that the daily grind of complexity reveals our own values however much they end up being compromised. Few institutions exhibit such a pervasive daily presence in American life as the EPA. Its decisions impact the air we breathe (indoors and outside), the water we drink, the food we eat, the health of the children we give birth to and raise, the cars and fuel we purchase, the beaches where we swim, the chemicals we consume (voluntarily or involuntarily) or the quality of nature that we enjoy. The public health and environmental benefits of the EPA’s actions have been enormous, even while controversial. As one example, a draft report to ...
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South 21.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South Danielle Purifoy Wed, 10/21/2020 - 00:45 This story was originally published by Southerly , in partnership with Scalawag and Environmental Health News for its Powerlines series, which looks at climate change, justice, and infrastructure in the American South. The series is supported by the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University, and is part of their  POWER project .  In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner’s community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for  Clean Water for North Carolina , she’d met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its  first North Carolina plant  there two years before.  The corporation, which manufactures wood pellets as a purportedly renewable alternative to coal, did what most industries do in ...
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A vote for clean energy 16.10.2020 GreenBiz.com
A vote for clean energy Sarah Golden Fri, 10/16/2020 - 01:45 I recently joined the most impressive group of clean energy leaders I’ve known, and it happens to have come together in support of Joe Biden for president. The network: Clean Energy for Biden (CE4B).  It includes more than 9,500 clean energy professionals in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. There are entrepreneurs, engineers, policymakers, technicians and investors. There are thought leaders I’ve long admired and business leaders that have made clean energy more accessible to all people. Clean energy professionals as a voting bloc CE4B is evidence that the clean energy sector is, perhaps for the first time, a significant voting bloc in the United States.  Before the start of the COVID crisis, the clean energy sector employed nearly 3.4 million Americans in all 50 states. In 42 states, more people are included in clean energy than in the fossil fuel industry. If mobilized, these millions of Americans could have a major impact in this ...
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Inside the world’s first VR circular fashion summit: 4 key takeaways 14.10.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Inside the world’s first VR circular fashion summit: 4 key takeaways Lilian Liu Wed, 10/14/2020 - 01:30 COVID-19 has radically accelerated the need for the fashion industry to innovate. The second edition of the Circular Fashion Summit bears fruit of this new socially distanced reality. The world’s first virtual reality (VR) fashion summit Oct. 3 and 4 was pioneered by founders Lorenzo Albrighi and ShihYun Kuo of Lablaco , a company that uses technology to accelerate the transition towards a circular economy for fashion, and was an official part of the Paris Fashion Week program this fall.  The virtual reality environment was mirrored after the Grand Palais, an iconic architectural exhibition hall at the heart of Paris and home to the famous Chanel shows. Fashion week formats have evolved dramatically during the pandemic — with digital and virtual shows or mixed digital plus in-person elements events taking place. The Circular Fashion Summit continued to push expectations. Participants were able to not ...
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Indigenous data sovereignty shakes up research 8.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In the COVID-19 era, tribal nations want research in service of their people.
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This new cooling technology also prevents viral spread 8.10.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This new cooling technology also prevents viral spread Gloria Oladipo Thu, 10/08/2020 - 00:40 In the face of dangerous heat waves this summer, Americans have taken shelter in air-conditioned cooling centers . Normally, that would be a wise choice, but during a pandemic, indoor shelters present new risks. The same air conditioning systems that keep us cool recirculate air around us, potentially spreading the coronavirus. "Air conditioners look like they’re bringing in air from the outside because they go through the window, but it is 100 percent recirculated air," said Forrest Meggers, an assistant professor of architecture at Princeton University. "If you had a system that could cool without being focused solely on cooling air, then you could actually open your windows." Meggers and an international team of researchers have developed a safer way for people to beat the heat — a highly efficient cooling system that doesn’t move air around. Scientists lined door-sized panels with tiny tubes that circulate ...
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