User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-Independent
Category: Education
Last updated: Nov 17 2017 02:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Genomic Study Explores Evolution of Gentle 'Killer Bees' in Puerto Rico 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A genomic study of Puerto Rico's Africanized honey bees – which are more docile than other so-called “killer bees” – reveals that they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees. According to the researchers, these changes likely contributed to the bees' rapid evolution toward gentleness in Puerto Rico, a change that occurred within 30 years.
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Study Reveals Structure and Origins of Glacial Polish on Yosemite's Rocks 16.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left highly polished surfaces on many of the region's rock formations. These smooth, shiny surfaces, known as glacial polish, are common in the Sierra Nevada and other glaciated landscapes.
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University of Oregon research maps major shifts in Colorado River history 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Geologists have long debated how and when the Colorado River made its first connection to the ocean. In a new study, a team led by the UO’s Becky Dorsey has helped pull the river’s story together.The river did not, as many thought, simply roar down out of the Colorado Plateau and pour into the Gulf of California.
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Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life 15.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption – not just organism death – are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure from a growing population and escalating synthetic chemical use. So reports a new study published this week in Elementa.
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How to Keep Cows Happy 15.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Corrals are used on livestock farms around the world to round up the animals when they need to be weighed or vaccinated. New research now shows that removing splashes of colors, shadows or water puddles from corrals, keeping noise levels down and not using dogs and electric prods can dramatically reduce the stress cattle experience. Maria Lúcia Pereira Lima of the Instituto de Zootecnia Sertãozinho in Brazil is the lead author of this study in Springer’s journal Tropical Animal Health and Production.
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Pesticides May Cause Bumblebees to Lose Their Buzz, Study Finds 14.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pesticides significantly reduce the number of pollen grains a bumblebee is able to collect, a new University of Stirling study has found.
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Synthetic circuits can harvest light energy 14.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
By organizing pigments on a DNA scaffold, an MIT-led team of researchers has designed a light-harvesting material that closely mimics the structure of naturally occurring photosynthetic structures.
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Southern Movement Assembly Creates a Framework With a Labor Sensibility for Southern Struggles 14.11.2017 Truthout.com
The Southern Movement Assembly's strategic framework operates on the principle of social unionism, seeing workplace and community issues as interconnected, and bringing them together in a broader struggle for economic justice. A discussion with Southern Movement Assembly coordinators Libby Devlin and Saladin Muhammad, and Project South founder Rita Valenti. Libby Devlin, Saladin Muhammad, and Rita Valenti participate in the Worker Justice Assembly at SMA VII. (Photo: Southern Movement Assembly [SMA Vll]) Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators, and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 90th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this ...
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VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration 14.11.2017 Environmental News Network
We’re all familiar with tipping points, when crossing what might seem a minor threshold can lead to drastically different outcomes—the Super Bowl favorite that falls to last place with injury to a single lineman, a tomato seedling that surges skyward the moment it tops the shadowy confines of its clay pot.
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New Map of Worldwide Croplands Supports Food and Water Security 14.11.2017 Environmental News Network
ndia has the highest net cropland area while South Asia and Europe are considered agricultural capitals of the world.A new map was released today detailing croplands worldwide in the highest resolution yet, helping to ensure global food and water security in a sustainable way.
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15,000 scientists from 184 countries warn of dire future for humanity 14.11.2017 TreeHugger
Humankind is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperiled biosphere, the authors write.
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York University research shows insecticide-laden seeds can disorient migrating songbirds 13.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Songbirds exposed to widely used insecticides during migration pit stops on farmland could lose significant body weight and become disoriented, research by York University and the University of Saskatchewan (U. of S.) has found.The researchers exposed white-crowned sparrows on spring migration to realistic doses of two different insecticides – imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid, and chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate – to see the effects on migratory activity, orientation and body mass.
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Urban Trees are Growing Faster Worldwide 13.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Trees in metropolitan areas have been growing faster than trees in rural areas worldwide since the 1960s. This has been confirmed for the first time by a study on the impact of the urban heat island effect on tree growth headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The analysis conducted by the international research team also shows that the growth of urban trees has already been exposed to changing climatic conditions for a long period of time, which is only just beginning to happen for trees in rural areas.
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The Hidden History of How California Was Built on Genocide 12.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
From 1846 to 1873, vigilantes, state militiamen and soldiers killed thousands of California Natives. But as historian Benjamin Madley shows in An American Genocide, man-made starvation, diseases and other factors caused tens of thousands more deaths. In this interview, the author tells Truthout why the treatment of Indigenous Californians counts as genocide, who perpetrated the genocide, and why it has wider significance today. History professor Benjamin Madley has written the first comprehensive investigation of the catastrophe that befell California's Indigenous population from 1846 to 1873: a catastrophe that was entirely man-made. An American Genocide catalogs the killing of tens of thousands of Native people during those years, and proves just how complicit the Californian and United States government were in the slaughter. Order this important book by donating to Truthout today! Modoc chief Kintpuash photographed by T.N. Wood in 1864. Kintpuash and his family were among the Modoc removed from ...
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Air pollution exposure inequality persists in Massachusetts 10.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Despite overall reductions in ambient air pollution in Massachusetts, exposure continues to fall unequally along racial/ethnic, income, and education lines, according to a new study led by a School of Public Health researcher.The study, published in Environmental Research, found concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) decreased across the state between 2003 and 2010, but exposure remained higher in predominantly Hispanic and non-Hispanic black communities. Within the state’s cities, the researchers found exposure inequality actually increased slightly between racial/ethnic groups during the study period.
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Some Coal Ash from China Too Radioactive for Reuse 10.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Manufacturers are increasingly using encapsulated coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete, wallboard, bricks, roofing and other building materials. But a new study by U.S. and Chinese scientists cautions that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China may be too radioactive for this use.
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The 2017 Elections Mark the Dawn of Change 10.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. What a difference a year makes! Waking up after Election Day in 2017 is incredibly different from last November, when we faced the prospect of a misogynist-in-chief in the White House, starring in a four-year reality show of his own creation at our expense. Trump and his cronies have worked hard to undermine every fundamental of our society: trust, solidarity, and equal opportunities for all. From the environment to health care, voting rights to immigration and education, they've relentlessly chipped away the bonds that hold us together. But we've worked harder, and smarter. We've come together, and dawn has finally come. We had to take to the streets and then to the polls to defend our nation's beliefs, but we did it. A Path Emerges Now, just a year later, Democrats and Progressives have reasons to feel proud. Tuesday's wins point a path towards even greater gains in midterm elections next year, which ...
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Zinke’s new sage grouse plans ignores years of work 10.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The changes adhere with Trump’s goals of energy dominance on public lands.
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The Public Bank Option -- Safer, Local and Half the Cost 10.11.2017 Truthout.com
Phil Murphy, a former banker, made the creation of a state-owned bank the centerpiece of his platform in his race for governor in New Jersey. After his win, the nation's second state-owned bank in a century could follow, especially as more and more elected officials come to understand how banking works and begin to see the benefits of establishing their own. (Photo: YinYang / Getty Images) Far more people read Truthout than will ever donate -- but we rely on donations to keep our publication running strong. Support independent journalism by making a contribution now! Phil Murphy, a former banker with a double-digit lead in New Jersey's race for governor, has made a state-owned bank a centerpiece of his platform. His victory on November 7 could lead to the nation's second state-owned bank in a century.    A UK study published on October 27, 2017 reported that the majority of politicians do not know where money comes from.  According to City A.M. (London)  : More than three-quarters of the MPs surveyed ...
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Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land WSU research shows 10.11.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
Washington State University researchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes.
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