User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-Independent
Category: Education
Last updated: Sep 24 2017 19:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In the Caribbean, Colonialism and Inequality Mean Hurricanes Hit Harder 24.9.2017 Truthout.com
Hurricane Maria, the  15th tropical depression  this season, is now battering the Caribbean, just two weeks after Hurricane Irma wreaked havoc in the region.  The devastation in Dominica is "mind-boggling," wrote the country's prime minister, Roosevelt Skerrit,  on Facebook  just after midnight on September 19. The next day, in Puerto Rico,  NPR reported  via member station WRTU in San Juan that "Most of the island is without power…or water."  Among the Caribbean islands  impacted by both deadly storms  are Puerto Rico, St Kitts, Tortola and Barbuda.  In this region, disaster damages are frequently amplified by needlessly protracted and incomplete  recoveries . In 2004,  Hurricane Ivan  rolled roughshod through the Caribbean  with wind speeds of 160 mph . The region's economy took more than three years to recover.  Grenada's surplus of US$17 million  became a deficit of $54 million, thanks to decreased revenue and the outlays for rehabilitation and reconstruction. Nor were the effects of a 7 magnitude ...
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USDA-funded study finds no-tillage alone not sufficient to prevent water pollution from nitrate 23.9.2017 Environmental News Network
A new IUPUI study funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture answers a long-debated agricultural question: whether no-tillage alone is sufficient to prevent water pollution from nitrate. The answer is no.
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New study: Corn's environmental impact varies greatly across the U.S. 23.9.2017 Environmental News Network
New research from the University of Minnesota drills down to the county-level impact of corn production.
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We must accelerate transitions for sustainability and climate change, experts say 23.9.2017 Environmental News Network
We must move faster towards a low-carbon world if we are to limit global warming to 2 degrees C this century, experts have warned.
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10 things you need to know about the restoration economy 22.9.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Preparing for climate change means building up the systems that protect our coasts and water. Some of those will be made of steel; others will be made of trees and sand.
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Green Algae Could Hold Clues for Engineering Faster-Growing Crops 22.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Two new studies of green algae — the scourge of swimming pool owners and freshwater ponds — have revealed new insights into how these organisms siphon carbon dioxide from the air for use in photosynthesis, a key factor in their ability to grow so quickly. Understanding this process may someday help researchers improve the growth rate of crops such as wheat and rice.
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Going Diving in the Tropics? Don't Eat the Reef Fish! 22.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Reducing tourist consumption of reef fish is critical for Palau’s ocean sustainability, finds a new Nippon Foundation-UBC Nereus Program study published today in Marine Policy.
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When residents take charge of their rainforests, fewer trees die 21.9.2017 Environmental News Network
When the government gives citizens a personal stake in forested land, trees don’t disappear as quickly and environmental harm slows down.
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Protected Waters Foster Resurgence of West Coast Rockfish 21.9.2017 Environmental News Network
West Coast rockfish species in deep collapse only 20 years ago have multiplied rapidly in large marine protected areas off Southern California, likely seeding surrounding waters with enough offspring to offer promise of renewed fishing, a new study has found.
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Gulf Spill Oil Dispersants Associated with Health Symptoms in Cleanup Workers 20.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Workers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study appeared online Sept. 15 in Environmental Health Perspectives and is the first research to examine dispersant-related health symptoms in humans.
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Emerging Disease Further Jeopardizes North American Frogs 20.9.2017 Environmental News Network
A deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. Frogs and salamanders are currently among the most threatened groups of animals on the planet. The two most common frog diseases, chytridiomycosis and ranavirus infection, are linked to frog population declines worldwide. The new study suggests that that SPI is the third most common infectious disease of frogs.
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UK oil and gas reserves may last only a decade 20.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The Scottish and UK oil industries are entering their final decade of production, research suggests.A study of output from offshore fields estimates that close to 10 per cent of the UK’s original recoverable oil and gas remains – about 11 per cent of oil and nine per cent of gas resources.The analysis also finds that fracking will be barely economically feasible in the UK, especially in Scotland, because of a lack of sites with suitable geology.
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Democratic Ownership and the Pluralist Commonwealth: The Creation of an Idea Whose Time Has Come 19.9.2017 Truthout.com
Slowly, like an image emerging in a photographer's darkroom, the basis of a different economy is beginning to appear. It might be called a "Pluralist Commonwealth" in its bringing together of different forms of democratic ownership, from neighborhood to community to region and beyond. An abandoned facility of the defunct Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company. (Photo: stu_spivack / Wikimedia ) Charles Derber offers a guide to the new era of organizing in Welcome to the Revolution: Universalizing Resistance for Social Justice and Democracy in Perilous Times. With guest contributions from Medea Benjamin, Ralph Nader, Noam Chomsky and more, this book makes a compelling argument about how movements must come together. Order your copy today with a donation to Truthout! The following piece by Gar Alperovitz forms one of the guest "interludes" in Welcome to the Revolution. On September 19, 1977 -- a day remembered locally as "Black Monday" -- the corporate owners of the Campbell Works in Youngstown, Ohio, abruptly ...
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Solar-to-Fuel System Recycles CO2 to Make Ethanol and Ethylene 19.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Berkeley Lab advance is first demonstration of efficient, light-powered production of fuel via artificial photosynthesis.
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Copper Catalyst Yields High Efficiency CO2-to-Fuels Conversion 19.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Berkeley Lab scientists discover critical role of nanoparticle transformation
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Sheep Gene Study May Help Breed Healthier Animals 18.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Fresh insights into the genetic code of sheep could aid breeding programmes to improve their health and productivity.
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Small-scale fisheries have big impact on oceans 18.9.2017 Environmental News Network
A new UBC study has found that small-scale fisheries may have a much larger impact on ocean ecosystems than previously thought, due to a lack of data on their development over time.“We found that the influence from small-scale fisheries is far from small,” said Jennifer Selgrath, lead author who completed the research as a PhD student with UBC’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries and Project Seahorse. “In our case study in the Philippines, we found that the fisheries have become unsustainable because there are so many people trying to catch a limited number of fish and invertebrates.”
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Western Towns Try To Stop Hungry Bears From Causing Havoc 18.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Sophie Quinton   BOULDER, Colo. — On a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking
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As oceans acidify, shellfish farmers respond 18.9.2017 Current Issue
Scientists collaborate to mitigate climate impacts in the Northwest.
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Youth in Revolt: Why Millennials Are the Key to Future Social Transformation 16.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Younger Americans may be more skeptical of our bipartisan political system -- a setup that they view as endangering the planet and subjecting the majority of people to economic precariousness and inequality -- but they often engage in actions aimed at system-wide transformation. In this, they are very much like their counterparts of the '60s who brought about mass political and cultural transformation. Young Americans are not "rebels without a cause." Rather, they share radical countercultural values that challenge the very foundation of US political and economic structures. (Photo: Vadim_Key / iStock / Getty Images Plus) Lamentations against the young are as old as history, and attacks on millennials are no exception. This age group is  criticized  for being lazy, self-indulgent, indecisive and unwilling to sacrifice in the pursuit of long-term occupational and life success. But these criticisms come off as unsustainable at a time when Americans find themselves working longer hours than at any time in ...
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