User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-National
Category: Economics :: Local Economies
Last updated: Jan 22 2019 20:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Denver homicides: 2018 saw highest number in 14 years as rate continues to climb 22.1.2019 Denver Post: News: Local
Sixty-seven people died by homicide in Denver in 2018, the highest number recorded since 2004 and the fourth year in a row that the number of killings in the city has remained level or climbed, data compiled by Denver police, the Denver Office of the Medical Examiner and The Denver Post show.
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'As World Teeters on Brink of Climate Catastrophe,' 600+ Groups Demand Congress Back Visionary Green New Deal 19.1.2019 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

On behalf of their millions of members and supporters, 626 environmental organizations on Thursday demanded that U.S. policymakers "pursue visionary and affirmative legislative action" such as a Green New Deal to combat the "urgent threat" of the global climate crisis.

"As the world teeters on the brink of climate catastrophe, we're calling on Congress to take large-scale action," said Bill Snape of the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), which signed the letter (pdf) to lawmakers. "Americans want a livable future for their children, and that requires keeping fossil fuels in the ground while greening the economy on a wartime footing."

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Junk, blight and problem businesses: South L.A. residents fume over code enforcement 12.1.2019 LA Times: Commentary

For more than a decade, complaints have rolled into the Department of Building and Safety about broken cars cluttering the street around an auto repair shop on West Adams Boulevard.

Again and again, Los Angeles city inspectors have ordered the shop to clean up its act.

And again and again, the...

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What lies beneath: To manage toxic contamination in cities, study their industrial histories 9.1.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
With the constant turnover of land, many American cities are facing legacy hazardous waste that they didn't even know was there.
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Potential energy: 7 hopeful power prognostications for 2019 4.1.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Corporates cleaning up, cities doubling down — welcome to the future of electricity for the new year.
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One year of legal pot sales and California doesn’t have the bustling industry it expected. Here’s why. 27.12.2018 LA Times: Commentary

When Californians voted in 2016 to allow the sale of recreational marijuana, advocates of the move envisioned thousands of pot shops and cannabis farms obtaining state licenses, making the drug easily available to all adults within a short drive.

But as the first year of licensed sales comes to...

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In a town of unanswered questions, Paradise tries to imagine its future 24.12.2018 LA Times: Commentary

Rain was falling as evacuees returned to their beloved town in the Sierra Nevada foothills. Traffic slowed as drivers beheld the devastation.

Five weeks earlier, an inferno swept through these wooded neighborhoods, exacting a terrible toll. Of the 86 people killed in the Camp fire, most lived here....

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How America’s Bluest State Can Be a Model for the Other 49 3.12.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom shakes hands with an election night crowd after he defeated Republican John Cox to become 40th governor of California in Los Angeles.  In the 2018 “blue wave” that flipped the House of Representatives, California flipped the most. Of the  seven target  congressional races in the state, all seven were won by Democrats. Orange County—a key launching pad for the anti-government ideologies of the modern Republican Party—will now be represented in Congress entirely by Democrats. Democrats also won every statewide office and will enjoy super-majorities—sufficient to pass tax legislation—in both state houses. (They’ll hold at least 60 of the 80 Assembly seats and 29 of the 40 in the Senate.) Golden State progressives may be permitted a brief moment – well, maybe a long weekend – of celebration. After all, the state that gave the nation Ronald Reagan, tax-cutting frenzy, and anti-immigrant hysteria now seems to have a Democratic advantage locked-in; even ...
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Climate change is already hurting U.S. communities, federal report says 24.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A massive new federal report warns that extreme weather disasters, like California's wildfires and this year's hurricanes, are worsening in the United States.
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Deadly fire leveled California town in less than a day 10.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Most of its buildings are in ruin. Entire neighborhoods are leveled. The business district is destroyed. In a single day, this town of 27,000 founded in the 1800s was largely incinerated by flames that moved so fast there was nothing firefighters could do.
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Sustainability and election 2018: Connecting the dots 7.11.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Did the triple bottom line actually show up during this year's election season?
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Mass Transit in the Sun Belt 1.11.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Even in car-dependent middle America, there is support for local mass transit in surprising places. Some of these are blue cities in red states, with City Hall governed by Democrats or pragmatic Republicans. In some, the local business elite backs transit initiatives out of frank acknowledgment that reliance on cars has reached its limits. This stance, however, puts them at odds with more ideologically anti-government Republicans who typically control Sun Belt state legislatures. The pro-carbon obsession of the Trump administration largely eliminates federal funds, at least for now, as any sort of carrot. The transit coalition is also fragile. With mass transit underdeveloped and inconvenient, many suburbanites view buses as transit of last resort for the poor and prefer commuting by car. And in some cities minority communities want more transit in principle, but don’t trust that new rail lines will serve ...
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Mass Transit in the Sun Belt 1.11.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Even in car-dependent middle America, there is support for local mass transit in surprising places. Some of these are blue cities in red states, with City Hall governed by Democrats or pragmatic Republicans. In some, the local business elite backs transit initiatives out of frank acknowledgment that reliance on cars has reached its limits. This stance, however, puts them at odds with more ideologically anti-government Republicans who typically control Sun Belt state legislatures. The pro-carbon obsession of the Trump administration largely eliminates federal funds, at least for now, as any sort of carrot. The transit coalition is also fragile. With mass transit underdeveloped and inconvenient, many suburbanites view buses as transit of last resort for the poor and prefer commuting by car. And in some cities minority communities want more transit in principle, but don’t trust that new rail lines will serve ...
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Private Equity Pillage: Grocery Stores and Workers At Risk 26.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Since 2015 seven major grocery chains, employing more than 125,000 workers, have filed for bankruptcy. The media has blamed “disruptors”—low-cost competitors like Walmart and high-end markets like Whole Foods, now owned by Amazon. But the real disruptors in this industry are the private equity owners who were behind all seven bankruptcies. They have extracted millions from grocery stores in the last five years—funds that could have been used to upgrade stores, enhance products and services, and invest in employee training and higher wages. As with the bankruptcies of common household names like Toys “R” Us, private equity owners throw companies they own into unsustainable debt in order to capture high returns for themselves and their investors. If the company they have starved of resources goes broke, they’ve already made their bundle. This is all perfectly legal. It should not be. The bankrupted private ...
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Opportunity Zones: a $100 billion investment for the clean economy? 23.10.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
A new provision of last year's tax law could be a boon to bringing renewable energy to economically distressed communities — but only if we act.
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Financing an equitable, sharing city 20.10.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
With private economic inequity at a high, public financing for community health and wealth is more important than ever.
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Philadelphia is so dirty the city wants residents and business owners to help collect trash 20.10.2018 Philly.com News
Tensions have simmered for years between neighborhoods and the city over the placement of trash cans and the question of who should be responsible for maintaining and emptying them.
'This is something that we can call our own' 15.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
After more than a half-century serving north Minneapolis, the family-owned Estes Funeral Chapel — one of the oldest black-owned businesses still operating in Minnesota — celebrated the grand opening of its new facility Sunday.
Can cooperatives save America's small farms? 11.10.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Amid a nationwide rise in worker-owned businesses of all types, small farms across the country are foregoing traditional farm ownership and reaping the benefits of cooperative farming.
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Jim Kenney 1,000 days in: The fine print of the Philly mayor's promises 10.10.2018 Philly.com News
End stop-and-frisk. Implement universal pre-K. Send tens of millions of dollars more to Philadelphia's schools. Create family-sustaining jobs. On his 1,000th day in office, Mayor Jim Kenney released a progress report. We ran a fine-tooth comb through it to determine what he's really gotten done.
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