User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-National
Category: Development :: International Development
Last updated: Jan 31 2020 01:15 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A Little-Known Climate Fund Is Suddenly In The Spotlight 9.6.2017 NPR News
It's the Green Climate Fund. It was called out by President Trump last week, who said he'd cut off U.S. "billions." What does it do, exactly, and what will be the impact of the cutback?
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Fact-Checking Trump on Climate Finance 5.6.2017 WRI Stories
Fact-Checking Trump on Climate FinanceAdd Comment|PrintLushoto, Tanzania, a learning site of Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security. Photo by CCAFS/flickr When President Donald Trump announced his intention to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement, he had plenty to say about international climate funding, much of which was simply inaccurate. Here’s a fact check of Trump’s June 1 Rose Garden remarks on climate finance. “Beyond the severe energy restrictions inflicted by the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Here's how cities in developing countries can tap green bonds 28.4.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Many city leaders already are working to finance resilience projects through green bonds.
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By the Numbers: How Business Benefits from the Sustainable Development Goals 5.4.2017 WRI Stories
By the Numbers: How Business Benefits from the Sustainable Development GoalsAdd Comment|PrintThere’s money to be made in solving the world’s sustainability problems. Global Landscapes Forum/Flickr The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have an unexpected champion—forward-thinking business leaders. The Business and Sustainable Development Commission, a group of corporate, finance and civil society leaders, recently released a report showing that achieving the SDGs in just four... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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ADB says Asia needs to double infrastructure spending 28.2.2017 AP Business
MANILA, Philippines (AP) -- The Asian Development Bank says developing countries in Asia and the Pacific will need to invest up to $1.7 trillion a year, or $26 trillion through 2030, to meet their infrastructure needs and to maintain the region's growth momentum - more than double the previous estimate in 2009....
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Strategies for Expanding Universal Access to Electricity Services for Development 10.2.2017 WRI Stories
Working Paper var switchTo5x = true;if (stLight !== undefined) { stLight.options({"publisher":"0d90f5fd-be41-4e8a-b4e5-b6e7b3711ec4","onhover":false,"headerTitle":"Share with your networks"}); }Featured Resource [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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The US Protects Its Wealthy Professionals Financially While Throwing Workers to the Wolves 18.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Talent and hard work have very little to do with why the rich get richer, says economist Dean Baker. In this exclusive Truthout interview, he discusses how Wall Street and Washington have structured the "free" market to favor the rich; why patent monopolies stifle innovation; and Trump's Carrier jobs scam. The New York Stock Exchange, pictured June 12, 2012. The free market is a myth. There is only a rigged market. (Photo: Dan Nguyen / Flickr ) The wealth disparity in the United States is astonishing, yet many have come to accept it as almost natural. In his new book, Dean Baker debunks the inevitability of this disparity, exposing the economics of a rigged system and offering hope to those who want a global economy that works for everyone. Get your copy of Rigged by making a tax-deductible donation to Truthout today!  The following interview with frequent Truthout commentator and economist Dean Baker (of the Center for Economic Policy and Research) drills deep into the fiction of capitalism being an ...
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At COP22, It Is Important To Ensure That Climate Finance Meets Africa's Needs 22.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change is the biggest problem we have ever had to face, as communities, countries and the planet. This means it is an expensive problem given that adjusting economies to limit greenhouse gas emissions costs money; so too does adapting agriculture, water use and coastlines. Developing countries, of which most of Africa is a part, just don't have that kind of money. That's the main reason global climate deals, which culminated in the Paris Agreement last year, have stipulated that developed countries need to come up with USD100 billion a year by 2020 in "climate finance" for developing countries. Climate finance alone will not resolve the climate crisis, and some experts say USD100 billion will not be sufficient. But the USD100 billion target is extremely important for African countries. At this year's global climate talks (COP22) in Marrakesh (Morocco), it is vital that countries finalise the recently published "roadmap" showing how the target will be reached. ©Greenpeace African countries need to ...
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Why The Debate On Trade Should Worry Development Communities 28.10.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Trade has assumed a remarkably prominent position in the US presidential election. In past elections, few topics seemed to dull public attention like tariffs and trade barriers, which meant that politicians typically focused on divisive social issues like abortion and gun control. But trade isn't the clear-cut issue cleanly divided along partisan lines that abortion and gun control are. It featured as much as a core theme in Donald Trump's campaign as it did in Bernie Sanders' run for Democratic nominee. Both candidates used it to appeal across their voter bases, from small manufacturing business owners to unemployed autoworkers. The focus on trade has been such an effective strategy that it's even forced Hillary Clinton to reverse her once-strong support of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Clearly, the debate on trade has proved constructive in a number of ways. It's highlighted the compromises made on behalf of unfettered globalization, and ...
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As Deadline Looms, WikiLeaks Reveals Corporate Demands from the European Union in the Trade in Services Agreement 15.10.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Deborah James

Friday, for the first time, WikiLeaks released demands by the EU to lock in a wide list of services sectors to TISA’s privatization and deregulation provisions, including public services in developing countries. In the mid-2000s, when European campaigners leaked similar demands during corporate efforts to expand the General Agreement on Trade in Services, the EU was forced to walk back many of those demands.

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How Can Developing Nations Access Climate Finance? Senegal and Kenya Share Lessons 8.8.2016 WRI Stories
How Can Developing Nations Access Climate Finance? Senegal and Kenya Share LessonsAdd Comment|PrintLeaders from Senegal and Kenya meet to share their experiences with climate finance. Photo by Indira Masullo. With three months to go until the next international climate negotiations, in Marrakech, Morocco, many developing countries are working hard to live up to the promises made in the Paris Agreement to cut emissions and adapt to climate impacts. They’ll need additional finance to achieve... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Finance, Renewable Energy And Social Inclusion Are Key To A Sustainable Future 5.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When opening the Climate Summit in Copenhagen, I quote one of my favorite Guyanese creole sayings: wan wan dutty build dam. Put differently, every house must sit on solid foundations and we build it one brick at a time. Many years later, the Paris Climate agreement brought us the international breakthrough many have fought for so hard: near universal action to address climate change and keep global average temperature well below 2 degrees centigrade. Of course it was the euphoria of the outcome that made the headlines. But the Paris agreement also noted some important points of caution. First that the commitments made in Paris are not enough to achieve the temperature goal, second that early action is imperative and thirdly that the provision of finance, technology and capacity support are essential to enable enhanced pre-2020 action by developing countries. As early as 2018 countries will meet to take stock of efforts taken to meet the long term goal. If Paris was all about setting the goal(s) and ...
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Who supports violent extremism in developing countries? 21.6.2016 Washington Post
Who supports violent extremism in developing countries?
America's Third World Nation 12.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
There is a Third World nation of 45 million inside the United States -- the population of Kenya -- who live in poverty without adequate health, education, housing, and social benefits. Despite this, candidate Bernie Sanders has found it difficult to gain traction for his anti-poverty policies in the Democratic primary in states where income inequality is highest. The recent exception is West Virginia where he won a resounding victory. America's impoverished grows. There is no trickle-down benefit for them, due to many reasons, but voting absence represents yet another obstacle. Sanders during his primary campaign has pointed out that poor people don't vote and points to the fact that (until West Virginia) he has lost his primary bid in 16 of the most unequal states in the union. "That's a sad reality of American society and that's what we have to transform... in America today, the last election in 2014, 80 percent of poor people did not vote," he said on the campaign trail. Politifact said exactly 75 ...
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China’s robot revolution 28.4.2016 Financial Times US
Across China, factories are replacing humans with robots in a new automation-driven industrial revolution. And the effects will be felt around the world
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World Bank May Be Spreading The Scourge That Fed Flint Water Crisis 12.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Gwen Moore (D-Wis.) is calling out the World Bank's investment in global water resources, alleging conflicts of interest similar to those that removed Flint, Michigan, from managing its own water.  Moore, ranking member on the House Monetary Policy and Trade Subcommittee, on Tuesday condemned the World Bank’s funding and promotion of water privatization through "public private partnerships" arranged by its investment arm, the International Finance Corp., or IFC. “I am increasingly uneasy with water resource privatization in developing countries and do not believe that the current ring-­fencing policies separating the investment and advising functions of the IFC are adequate,” Moore wrote in a letter to World Bank President Jim Yong Kim. Moore's committee has jurisdiction over the World Bank. The IFC’s purpose is to advise and invest with private companies to advance work in developing countries. But Moore, backed by watchdog group Corporate Accountability International, argued the ...
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A Plan to Tackle a Changing Climate 12.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When the rains came to Senegal's capital and largest city, Dakar, in 2009, the people in Cite de Soleil were up to their chests in water. Even today you can still see the water marks on the walls. People who live there today still talk of the stench, the diarrhea, and the chest ailments suffered by the children. Travel along the coast and the impact of increased erosion on tourism spots is all too evident. Go inland and you see people having to cope with significant droughts and shorter growing seasons. It's all too evident that people, particularly poor people, are already suffering the effects of weather-induced stresses. And looking forward, the climate models suggest that this will only get worse with more extreme rainfall likely in Dakar, stronger coastal erosion, reduced fishing opportunities, and more extreme drought conditions inland. Senegal is trying to tackle these issues, often with the help of the World Bank. One project is putting in place infrastructure to help manage the floods. It seems ...
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World stocks up amid Chinese stimulus hopes 11.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Tokyo • Stocks mostly rose on Monday following a rally in oil prices and after weak Chinese inflation figures increased hopes for more market-boosting stimulus. KEEPING SCORE: Germany’s DAX gained 1.2 percent to 9,740.03 and the CAC 40 of France added 0.7 percent to 4,333.36. The FTSE 100 was up 0.1 percent at 6,210.66. U.S. markets looked set for small gains, with both S&P and Dow futures up 0.4 percent. ANALYST VIEWPOINT: “Strong gains in the oil market and a solid close in U.S. markets should...
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East Asian growth to remain over 6% in 2016 11.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Manila, Philippines • Growth in developing East Asia and the Pacific is expected to remain resilient despite the slowdown in China and a gloomy global outlook, the World Bank said Monday. The U.S.-led development bank forecasts that developing East Asia will expand at a still robust pace of 6.3 percent this year and 6.2 percent in 2017-2018, down from 6.5 percent in 2015 and slightly lower than its forecast in October. The Philippines and Vietnam will lead growth in Southeast Asia. Indonesia, th...
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The Cuban Health System at the Dawn of Détente 23.3.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
President Obama's visit to Cuba this week once again focused the eyes of the world on the island nation. After the initial rapprochement in 2014, several major U.S. outlets highlighted the country's health care system , unique to the Third World, and one which, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, "has solved some problems that ours has not yet managed to address." Sound heretical? Not to those who have studied it. Cuba's health performance Cuba, a country of 11 million people, has achieved health outcomes that are the envy of the Third World. It has one of the lowest infant and young child (under age 5) mortality rates and longest life expectancies in the Americas, outperforming the U.S. on all three of these indicators (although the maternal mortality rate is still considerably higher than that in rich countries). This year, Cuba also became the first nation in the world that, according to the World Health Organization, had eliminated mother-to-child transmission of HIV and ...
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