User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-National
Category: Development :: Community Development
Last updated: Feb 18 2018 23:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Multiple job changes, an old friendship and fighting crime: Denver’s new public safety director speaks 18.2.2018 Denver Post: News: Local
Troy Riggs, Denver's new public safety director, has changed jobs a lot but he says he wants to be in Denver to continue a career in law enforcement and local government.
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The day that Congress and Trump actually got healthcare right | Ronnie Polaneczky 14.2.2018 Philly.com News
"They refused to turn us away, even when my son was at his worst. I'd be in a panic and they'd say, 'It's all right. We'll figure this out.'"
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State lawmakers want to restore an urban renewal and affordable housing program. But it's complicated 12.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary

Seven years ago, at the depth of the state’s budget crisis, Gov. Jerry Brown eliminated an urban renewal program that provided billions of dollars annually for economic development and low-income housing. Ever since, lawmakers have tried and failed to bring it back.

Now, with Brown on his way out...

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Health care for Philly and Pa.'s poorest gets boost in Congress Thursday 7.2.2018 Philly.com News
If Congress doesn't act this week, health care services for hundreds of thousands of poverty-stricken people could be threatened.
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Amidst controversy over police shootings and drones, how does Los Angeles replace Chief Charlie Beck? 7.2.2018 LA Times: Commentary
Los Angeles Police Commissioner Sandra Figueroa-Villa talks about the fraught task she and her fellow commissioners face.
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Making Medicaid a pathway out of poverty 5.2.2018 Washington Post: Op-Eds
We owe Medicaid recipients a program that encourages dignity and self-sufficiency.
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Here’s What Happens When Trump Policy Comes to Trump Country 2.2.2018 Mother Jones
Elkhart County, Indiana, is proud of its recreational vehicles. The county—90 percent white, 41 percent factory workers, and located along the state’s northern border with Michigan—hosts RV rallies at its 4-H fairgrounds, houses an RV hall of fame, and is the heart of a region that manufactures 80 percent of the world’s RVs. It’s also a […]
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World Wetlands Day 2018: #KeepUrbanWetlands 2.2.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
World Wetlands Day 2018: #KeepUrbanWetlands
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How Economic Distress Impacts Your Health 1.2.2018 Truthout.com
You'll never see a paywall at Truthout and we'll never artificially restrict your access to the news. Can you pitch in to help keep it that way? We rely on our readers to keep us online, so make a one-time or monthly donation today! According to  a recent report , Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and West Virginia have the worst health in the US. These states have higher rates of premature deaths, chronic diseases and poor health behaviors year after year. Why are people in some places in the US consistently less healthy than those in others? If you look to health and fitness magazines, it may seem like poor diet, lack of exercise and other bad behaviors are to blame. Genetics and access to health care are also commonly cited reasons for why some people are healthier than others. But where a person lives, works and plays also matters. As a public health researcher interested in how society affects our health, my research shows where you live plays a powerful role on your health. Economic ...
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Why Rural America Isn't a Lost Cause for Progressive Ideas 31.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Rural politicians across the country are buying into a new way of campaigning, with platforms that might sound more aligned with those of college students living in Berkeley, California, than former miners from the central Appalachian coalfields. They're talking about raising the minimum wage, universal health care, debt-free college and investing in local assets, instead of industrial recruitment. If you're a fan of real journalism, now's the time to strengthen Truthout's mission. Help us keep publishing stories that expose government and corporate wrongdoing: Make a donation right now! For the past seven years, Jess King has directed a business development nonprofit in her hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She watched the community's poverty rate climb to 30 percent over that time, well above that of the state's two largest cities, Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. She also saw how state and federal policy influenced the very real decisions of real people in her community, often in increasingly negative ...
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Worker Cooperatives Offer Real Alternatives to Trump's Retrograde Economic Vision 28.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Worker-owners of Maharlika Cleaning Cooperative, which provides high quality, eco-friendly office cleaning services. (Photo: Maharlika) Where do you turn for news and analysis you can rely on? If the answer is Truthout, then please support our mission by making a tax-deductible donation! Announcing his presidency in 2016, Donald Trump promised the nation that he'd become "the greatest job president God ever created." His plan to accomplish this rested on a retrograde economic vision that would "make America great again," by restoring waning coal and manufacturing jobs, as well as putting an end to the alleged assault on American work by foreign immigrants and global competition. A year later, his attempts to realize this vision have largely consisted of backwards motion. In October, he rolled back the Clean Power Plan, arguing that carbon emissions regulations, rather than the widespread shift away from fossil fuels, were responsible for the decline of US coal. While the striking of these environmental ...
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Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State speech, annotated 26.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary

Times journalists are annotating Gov. Jerry Brown’s State of the State speech. If you see a passage highlighted in yellow, you can click on it to see what we have to say about it. You can also highlight passages and leave your own comments.

Below is the text as prepared for delivery:

Good morning....

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Climate Change Is Forcing the Government to Relocate This Entire Louisiana Town 25.1.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by CityLab and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The only land route that connects Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, to the rest of the continental United States is Island Road, a thin, four-mile stretch of pavement that lies inches above sea level and immediately drops off into open […]
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Innovative Illinois initiative seeks to make solar power available for all 24.1.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Innovative Illinois initiative seeks to make solar power available for all
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The Battle of the Georgetown Mill 24.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Ed Green worked in Georgetown, South Carolina’s steel mill for almost four decades, overlapping with his father, who helped build the mill. His friends died, he won and lost union elections, and he challenged management to hire more black craftsmen. In later years, Green’s hips gave out, victims of contorting his body into crevices of the mill. His buddies called him Fred Sanford, after the television series’ title character, who wobbled more than walked. Though the mill closed in 2015, Green still regularly comes to the Steelworkers Union Hall. Paul Skoko, a retired English teacher, grew up in the historic district of Georgetown, across Front Street from where Green’s father helped to build the mill. Skoko has remained in the house so he can continue to play the organ at his church, as he’s done for the past 52 years. The steel mill turned Skoko’s house a shade of rust. Since 2002, he has refused to paint. ...
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Chicago hospitals worry about closures, layoffs as they brace for Medicaid funding changes 21.1.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
It wasn’t long ago that Charles Holland was giving opening-day tours of the gleaming outpatient center at St. Bernard Hospital in the Englewood neighborhood, built to bring a bevy of health care services — and optimism — to a community in need of both. A year and a half later, the carpets ...
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Climate change is hitting African Americans hard. Here’s how Maryland can lead. 20.1.2018 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Our tentative approach to climate change is not working.
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Cities should respond to Amazon's squeeze play by saying no to subsidies 20.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary

Amazon released its short list of contenders for its second-headquarters project on Thursday, and the news was bad. Whether it was worse for the hundreds of communities left out of the running or for the 20 so-called finalists is an open question.

Judging from the willingness of some remaining...

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An Organizer's Life 19.1.2018 American Prospect
There’s a scene in last year’s documentary by Lilly Rivlin, Heather Booth: Changing the World, in which Heather and Paul Booth discuss how they met at an anti-war sit-in at the University of Chicago’s administration building in 1966. “The sit-in lasted several days and nights. We got to know each other very well,” Paul recalled. “By the end of the week I was ready to propose marriage and I did.” Married the following year, they spent a lifetime together as key organizers and activists in every social justice movement of the past half-century. On Wednesday, Heather was escorted, in handcuffs, out of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., at a protest of Dreamers and Jewish activists in support of DACA and immigrant rights. At the time, she didn't know it was Paul's last day. Paul had died unexpectedly at 7:30 p.m. of complications of leukemia. In their last conversation, Paul told Heather that he was proud of her involvement in the civil disobedience. It bespeaks their lifetime together as activists. Paul spent ...
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Remote Rangely aims for a retail revival to diversify its boom-and-bust oil economy 19.1.2018 Denver Post: Business
As in other remote towns, business owners in Rangely in northwest Colorado operate in a challenging environment -- they're a critical resource for those who live in the region yet face growing competition for the local retail dollar. Additional obstacles, such as a downturn in the oil industry that has created economic challenges in many rural areas of Colorado, demand that they draw on all their reserves of resilience and adaptability.
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1 to 20 of 6,439