User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-National
Category: Finance
Last updated: Sep 16 2020 07:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Using the Ocean As a Tool for Global Economic Recovery 16.9.2020 WRI Stories
Using the Ocean As a Tool for Global Economic Recovery Comments|Add Comment|PrintCoastal communities, which heavily rely on the ocean economy, are among the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Nilantha Ilanguamuwa/Flickr The ocean economy, which contributes upwards of $1.5 trillion in value added to the global economy, was particularly hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, with a projected loss of $1.9 billion for international shipping carriers alone. Coastal communities were hardest... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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From speedier Wi-Fi to new bikes: As the pandemic drags on, companies pay for work-from-home perks beyond the basics 10.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
With the six-month mark of the COVID-19 outbreak approaching and no return to the office in sight, Chicago-area employers are doubling down on remote work investments. The perks have shifted, moving beyond office supplies and toward mental wellness. It is evident now that working remote through a global pandemic requires more than a comfy office chair.
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Hard truths from a decade of investing in regional food systems 10.9.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Hard truths from a decade of investing in regional food systems Meredith Storton Thu, 09/10/2020 - 02:00 The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the inequities and fragility of our industrialized food system and accelerated the movement to create strong regional food systems that support local growers, provide food security, give communities agency over their food supply and yield environmental benefits. These systems will remain out of reach, though, unless we address persistent, decades-old structural issues. Price pressures continue to challenge the viability of decentralized food systems and communities of color continue to be underserved — as farmers, food chain workers, supply chain entrepreneurs and consumers. We need to change both who we fund and how we fund if we want to create equitable, thriving regional food systems. What will it take to achieve such massive shifts? RSF Social Finance has been reflecting on that question as we wind down our Food System Transformation Fund, a pooled loan fund ...
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Pennsylvania legislators seek to protect workers, ratepayers and our climate 25.8.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
As Gov. Tom Wolf and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) move forward to advance meaningful climate action in Pennsylvania, legislators are also stepping up with a new complementary bill. Last month, state Senate Minority Leader Jay Costa introduced legislation with 17 of his colleagues that charts a course to a cleaner, more sustainable power […]
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Four reasons why investing in clean energy is essential for rebuilding the economy 25.8.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
As federal lawmakers continue to debate different approaches for jump-starting our economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, they must also consider how the investments we make today can be designed to avoid the worst environmental, social and economic impacts of climate change in the long run. Amid much disagreement, one promising area of […]
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How to Use Forests to Fend Off a Water and Energy Crisis in Colombia 20.8.2020 WRI Stories
How to Use Forests to Fend Off a Water and Energy Crisis in Colombia Comments|Add Comment|PrintColombia's forests, including the Sumapaz Páramo landscape, can play a critical role in the nation's water and energy systems. Photo by Alejandro Bernal Ph/Shutterstock An old Colombian saying goes: “en abril, lluvias mil,” meaning “it rains a lot in April.” But that was not the case this year. This April, precipitation levels in Colombia were 40% less than expected, well below the historical... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Going Low-Carbon Can Help Brazil Build Back Better 17.8.2020 THE CITY FIX
Brazil faces a fundamental choice of how to address the convergence of multiple crises it is now seeing: health, economic and environmental. The COVID-19 pandemic exposed and multiplied the risks and weaknesses in our societies and economies, disproportionately impacting poor ...
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Going Low-Carbon Can Help Brazil Build Back Better 13.8.2020 WRI Stories
Going Low-Carbon Can Help Brazil Build Back Better Comments|Add Comment|PrintA new climate, low-carbon economy will add $535 billion to Brazil’s GDP by 2030 and create 2 million new jobs. Photo by Sergio Souza/Unsplash Brazil faces a fundamental choice of how to address the convergence of multiple crises it is now seeing: health, economic and environmental. The COVID-19 pandemic exposed and multiplied the risks and weaknesses in our societies and economies, disproportionately impacting poor and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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A Fairer and More Sustainable Post-COVID World in Latin America 6.8.2020 THE CITY FIX
The large cities in the Latin American region all have one thing in common: the opportunities for employment and income are concentrated in a few districts while, more and more, sprawling housing zones are located on the outskirts of cities ...
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New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color 6.8.2020 GreenBiz.com
New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color Lacey Shaver Thu, 08/06/2020 - 00:20 There is a new urgency across the United States to address structural and systemic racial inequities in criminal justice , wealth and housing , employment , health care and education . These disparities are also pervasive in energy. One common measure of this is "energy burden," or the share of take-home income spent on energy bills. Communities of color have been shown to have a 24–27 percent higher energy burden than White Americans when controlling across income levels, and low-income residents experience an energy burden up to three times higher than high-income residents. Rooftop solar has the potential to reduce energy burden in communities of color, but it has not yet lived up to its potential due to systemic barriers: lack of solar education and outreach; financial challenges such as lower income and access to credit; and issues related to home ownership, such as lower ...
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A Fairer and More Sustainable Post-COVID World in Latin America 6.8.2020 WRI Stories
A Fairer and More Sustainable Post-COVID World in Latin America Comments|Add Comment|PrintThe coronavirus recovery is a chance for Latin America's cities to become more equitable. Photo by Mariana Gil/WRI. This blog post originally appeared in the C40 Knowledge Hub. The large cities in the Latin American region all have one thing in common: the opportunities for employment and income are concentrated in a few districts while, more and more, sprawling housing zones are located on the outskirts... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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First Women’s Bank, poised to become Chicago’s first bank startup in a decade, aims to tackle the gender gap in lending 31.7.2020 Chicago Tribune: Business
A group of local women from the banking and professional services industries is looking to start a new commercial bank in Chicago, with a focus on lending to women-owned businesses. First Women’s Bank, which received conditional approval this month from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., would be the first financial institution startup in the Chicago area in more than 10 years.
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America’s New Climate Economy: A Comprehensive Guide to the Economic Benefits of Climate Policy in the United States 28.7.2020 WRI Stories
Working Paper Featured ...
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10 Charts Show the Economic Benefits of US Climate Action 28.7.2020 WRI Stories
10 Charts Show the Economic Benefits of US Climate Action Comments|Add Comment|PrintSmoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas, United States. Photo by Drenaline/Wikimedia Commons The United States made substantial progress towards a low-carbon economy over the past several years. Low-carbon technologies became more efficient and affordable compared to fossil fuels, while U.S. clean energy investment and deployment grew to new heights, creating millions of jobs. All this progress could be in jeopardy... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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8 cities share how racial justice is embedded into their climate plans 20.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
8 cities share how racial justice is embedded into their climate plans Jesse Klein Mon, 07/20/2020 - 02:00 As COVID-19 rampages through vulnerable minority populations with tragic consequences, and protests for racial justice surge among a similar demographic, city climate planners see a renewed focus on climate justice. The pandemic, in some ways, has been a trial run for the anticipated coming impacts of climate change — a not-so-distant future in which low-income and minority populations are the most at risk. As mayors make quick strategic changes to address the short-term COVID crisis, they are also in the midst of planning for similar long-term climate issues. Last week, the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group , an organization of mayors from around the global, launched a Detailed Agenda for Green and Just Recovery from COVID-19 to ensure that this crisis propels sustainable innovations instead of a return to old ways.  "Equity is really at the heart of our recovery in the city," said Mayor LaToya ...
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4 Investments to Secure Ocean Health and Wealth 14.7.2020 WRI Stories
4 Investments to Secure Ocean Health and Wealth Comments|Add Comment|PrintSustainable, ocean-based investments can yield a number of benefits for economies, communities, businesses and households. Photo by Knut Troim/Unsplash Ocean-based industries are worth at least 3.5% of global GDP, a value the OECD predicted will double by 2030. More than 3 billion people rely on the ocean for their livelihoods and more than 350 million jobs are linked to the ocean worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic is... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Global Warming. Inequality. COVID-19. And Al Gore Is…Optimistic? 13.7.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Wired and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Before he was the guy with the climate change PowerPoint presentation, before he lost the US presidency by a nose (and a Supreme Court decision), Al Gore had a reputation for pitching ambitious policy solutions to the knottiest societal problems. From the Senate […]
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STATEMENT: Global Commission on Adaptation COVID-19 Call to Action 9.7.2020 WRI Stories
STATEMENT: Global Commission on Adaptation COVID-19 Call to Action Global Commission on Adaptation Call to Action for a Climate-Resilient Recovery from COVID-19 Download the PDF version The COVID-19 pandemic has tragically exposed the risks humanity faces and how unprepared we are to respond. People’s health, well-being, and livelihoods are all affected. These threats are multiplied by the growing impacts of the climate crisis — more extreme storms, droughts, heat waves, food crises, and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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STATEMENT: Call to Action for a Climate-Resilient Recovery from COVID-19 9.7.2020 WRI Stories
STATEMENT: Call to Action for a Climate-Resilient Recovery from COVID-19Download the PDF version The COVID-19 pandemic has tragically exposed the risks humanity faces and how unprepared we are to respond. People’s health, well-being, and livelihoods are all affected. These threats are multiplied by the growing impacts of the climate crisis — more extreme storms, droughts, heat waves, food crises, and diseases — which have not stopped. Vulnerable populations are hit hardest: The pandemic could... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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3 Ways U.S. Cities Are Investing in Clean Energy for Resilience 24.6.2020 THE CITY FIX
By 2030, more than 145 million people across the world will be impacted by flooding each year – many of whom live in coastal areas of the United States. Wildfires are growing rapidly in areas of the U.S. where they once were ...
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