User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-National
Category: Finance
Last updated: Nov 01 2018 15:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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3 reasons why it's time to install solar in the Sunshine State 1.11.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
With some of the highest solar capacity in the nation, there's clear demand for the clean energy job potential in Florida.
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Trump’s New Opportunity Zones Look Great for Investors 29.10.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Julio Cortez A man walks by a closed restaurant along Bergen Street in a so-called opportunity zone in Newark, New Jersey. trickle-downers_35.jpg Like kids before a piñata, investors and real-estate developers have been lining up to cash in on a new suite of tax cuts for investments in low-income areas, known as “opportunity zones.” Now, with the release of much-anticipated guidelines by the Trump administration, the party can finally begin. The opportunity zone program, one of the rare provisions in last year’s Republican tax overhaul to receive some Democratic support, is the latest spin on a decades-old policy intended to attract capital to economically distressed areas by offering a range of financial goodies, such as tax benefits and subsidies. With sufficiently lucrative incentives available, the theory goes, wealthy investors will happily put their dollars into small businesses, local infrastructure, and housing in areas otherwise starved of investment.  Sounds like a win-win for all. ...
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Private Equity Pillage: Grocery Stores and Workers At Risk 26.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Since 2015 seven major grocery chains, employing more than 125,000 workers, have filed for bankruptcy. The media has blamed “disruptors”—low-cost competitors like Walmart and high-end markets like Whole Foods, now owned by Amazon. But the real disruptors in this industry are the private equity owners who were behind all seven bankruptcies. They have extracted millions from grocery stores in the last five years—funds that could have been used to upgrade stores, enhance products and services, and invest in employee training and higher wages. As with the bankruptcies of common household names like Toys “R” Us, private equity owners throw companies they own into unsustainable debt in order to capture high returns for themselves and their investors. If the company they have starved of resources goes broke, they’ve already made their bundle. This is all perfectly legal. It should not be. The bankrupted private ...
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The Trade Strategy We Need 24.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine.  Subscribe here .  Hardly a week goes by without another U.S. tariff hike on China, Mexico, Canada, or one of our European allies. Different justifications are given each time: to stop Mexicans from immigrating to the United States, to shrink the trade deficit, to make China and Germany play by the rules, and of course, to “make America great again.” But Trump’s tariff tantrum is doomed to fail because it isn’t driven by a clear idea of what is wrong with the system. His policies will inflict pain on the United States and across the global economy, and crack the foundations of the international system. Worse, they are not part of an underlying economic strategy to restore balanced and equitable growth in the U.S. and world economy. The one real bright spot is that Trump’s actions have revived an overdue debate about reform of the global trading system. Argument has been going on for decades, while trade policy was made by a ...
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Opportunity Zones: a $100 billion investment for the clean economy? 23.10.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
A new provision of last year's tax law could be a boon to bringing renewable energy to economically distressed communities — but only if we act.
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The Silver Lining of the New Gilded Age: Fewer Targets 22.10.2018 American Prospect
At noon on January 17 of this year, activists began protesting outside the Blackstone Group’s New York City headquarters over the private equity giant’s foreclosures in Puerto Rico. Simultaneously, a social justice group in California released a report detailing Blackstone’s alleged mistreatment of thousands of the state’s tenants. The timing was no coincidence. The extreme concentration of economic ownership and power in 21stt-century America is creating more opportunities for disparate groups—from renters and unions to community groups and financial reform organizations—to ally against common adversaries and pressure them for broad concessions. This growing collaboration points to what some see as a necessary reaction and potential silver lining to the New Gilded Age. “The same guys own everything,” Stephen Lerner, a veteran community and labor organizer, told a crowd of labor leaders in New York City late last year. “We can align our forces in a different way because we have the same enemy.” Nurturing ...
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Financing an equitable, sharing city 20.10.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
With private economic inequity at a high, public financing for community health and wealth is more important than ever.
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Hurricane Michael highlights urgent need for more solar opportunities in Florida 19.10.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Hurricane Michael highlights urgent need for more solar opportunities in Florida
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Hurricane Michael highlights urgent need for more solar opportunities in Florida 19.10.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Hurricane Michael highlights urgent need for more solar opportunities in Florida
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Trump Signals Journalists Are Fair Game 12.10.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) President Trump and Jared Kushner on October 1, 2018 It should come as little surprise, I suppose, that a president who routinely demeans the press and has contempt for First Amendment demonstrations should have nothing bad to say about a regime that allegedly tortured and executed, inside its own consulate, a journalist living in exile. Never mind that the agents of that regime who are believed to have murdered the journalist also reportedly dismembered his body, and spirited it out of the diplomatic compound. If you think the case of Jamal Khashoggi is simply a Saudi thing, think again. His suspected murder, which allegedly took place in the Saudi embassy in Istanbul, could not have been carried out without the approval of the crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman—the very same crown prince who pals around with Jared Kushner, President Donald J. Trump’s son-in-law, and who rules a country whose investments in the Trump and Kushner businesses have been ...
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The transportation equity conundrum: 6 ways cities can improve mobility without displacement 9.10.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
There are countless opportunities — but limited investment funds.
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7 crucial tools to accelerate energy efficiency 25.9.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Meeting global climate challenges will require every tool we have. Energy efficiency is many packed into one.
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A Trump tax break for investors in some of Philly's hottest neighborhoods 25.9.2018 Philly.com News
"A lot of the zones [for tax breaks] are in areas we no longer think of as edgy."
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There Is No ‘Trump Economy,’ Especially in Workers’ Paychecks 21.9.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Evan Vucci President Donald Trump waves as he arrives for a campaign rally in Las Vegas.  To hear President Trump and his economics team tell the story, the U.S. economy was in shambles until they came along to fix it. The falsity of this claim is widely known to the majority who have learned that this president lies a lot. But as the overall U.S. economy has been posting some impressive numbers, it’s worth taking a quick dive into these claims. To telegraph our punchline, our analysis clearly reveals that Trump is riding trends he inherited. He took office in year eight of a solid expansion, and he’s benefitting from its continuation. Yet, while growth remains strong, it is not reaching working people, and here, the President’s policies—specifically, his corporate tax cuts—are playing a role.  To be fair, presidents always take credit for growth on their watch (and defer blame for negative trends), but, as in so many other areas, Trump is different. His inaugural speech spoke of “American ...
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Bailout Over, Greece Returning to Stormy Markets 10.9.2018 Wall St. Journal: World
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras unveiled his post-bailout economic policy over the weekend, promising some relief from austerity measures while sticking to budget discipline.
A Pa. law sets off a feeding frenzy for public water systems. Will customers pay the cost? 5.9.2018 Philly.com News
Private buyers say they offer solutions to troubled towns. But critics worry about rates. Under the law, utilities can charge ratepayers the appraised fair-market value, rather than the lower, depreciated cost.
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Trump's 'opportunity zones' could give his South Jersey golf club a tax break 8.8.2018 Philly.com News
Those incentives could attract investment in a new restaurant or hotel at the Pine Hill golf course property, raising possible conflicts.
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Four city labor contracts, 1 pension fund and a plan to close a $6 billion gap 1.8.2018 Philly.com News
In his first two years in office, Mayor Kenney signed new contracts with all four of the city's major labor unions. Those contracts contain changes to the city's pension plan. We take a look at how the city plans to get the beleaguered fund from 45 percent funded to 80 percent in 12 years.
Will the Tax Act Set Back Private Equity? 2.7.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File House Speaker Paul Ryan, left, and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, second from left, congratulate each other after signing the final version of the GOP tax bill during an enrollment ceremony at the Capitol in Washington Section 13301 of the  Tax Cuts and Jobs Act  spans only 12 of the legislation’s 503 pages. It doesn’t cover the giant corporate tax rate cut, the trim to the top marginal rate, or changes to pass-through income. It wasn’t part of anyone’s talking points, whether touting or damning the tax overhaul. After passage, few even understood how it got into the bill. But Section 13301 could affect the lives of millions of Americans. It could radically upend the balance sheets of some of the most powerful financial institutions in the country. It’s hard to know at this point exactly how these firms will compensate for the changes. But it does show how small shifts in the tax laws can have wide-ranging, unanticipated consequences. What does Section ...
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Social finance: Challenges for its legal regulation 28.6.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Politics in Canada Last month, the Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology issued a report entitled The Federal Role in a Social Finance Fund. The Committee's recommendations included the federal government creating and contributing to a national social finance fund. This recommendation, among others from the Committee, aligns with, for example, the social enterprise strategy of the Ontario government . For all of the optimism percolating through the Senate report and Ontario's strategy there is the challenge of how to reconcile two dynamics that historically have been opposed: the private interest for profit and the common interest for public benefit. Social finance is about harnessing capital and the forces of the market to solve social problems. It's about commercializing social, environmental and cultural problems that traditionally were addressed by government as part of an overall goal of wealth redistribution and creation and protection of public goods. Social finance ...
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