User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Economics :: Ecological Economics
Last updated: Oct 26 2020 17:29 IST RSS 2.0
 
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EPA @ 50, and what it says about you and me 26.10.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
EPA @ 50, and what it says about you and me Terry F. Yosie Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:45 The American people always have possessed a very personal relationship with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Like all personal relationships, the EPA and its public have their share of successes and shortcomings, adjustments of expectations to realities, and recognition that the daily grind of complexity reveals our own values however much they end up being compromised. Few institutions exhibit such a pervasive daily presence in American life as the EPA. Its decisions impact the air we breathe (indoors and outside), the water we drink, the food we eat, the health of the children we give birth to and raise, the cars and fuel we purchase, the beaches where we swim, the chemicals we consume (voluntarily or involuntarily) or the quality of nature that we enjoy. The public health and environmental benefits of the EPA’s actions have been enormous, even while controversial. As one example, a draft report to ...
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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South 21.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South Danielle Purifoy Wed, 10/21/2020 - 00:45 This story was originally published by Southerly , in partnership with Scalawag and Environmental Health News for its Powerlines series, which looks at climate change, justice, and infrastructure in the American South. The series is supported by the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University, and is part of their  POWER project .  In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner’s community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for  Clean Water for North Carolina , she’d met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its  first North Carolina plant  there two years before.  The corporation, which manufactures wood pellets as a purportedly renewable alternative to coal, did what most industries do in ...
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Energy dominance or climate action: Trump, Biden and the fate of public lands 1.10.2020 High Country News Most Recent
In Grand Junction, Colorado, the presidential election is a choice between two distinct energy futures.
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Trump’s new NEPA is faster and narrower 10.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Land agencies have less time — and get less public scrutiny — to issue environmental assessments.
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How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change 20.7.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change Joel Makower Mon, 07/20/2020 - 02:11 Last week, a group of activists, scientists, academics and others issued a report calling for policies and other initiatives to generate prosperity while addressing inequity and the climate crisis. They called it the Blue New Deal. Its focus: an ocean-based blue economy . The problem, these experts said, is that the much-ballyhooed Green New Deal doesn’t adequately address the many environmental and social challenges that lie along the world’s shorelines and into the deep blue: industrial overfishing; coastal flooding; declining biodiversity; plastic waste; irresponsible tourism; unsustainable aquaculture; oil and chemical pollution; invasive species; and a range of other issues, many affecting the lives and livelihoods of coastal communities. Yes, provisions in the Green New Deal address fisheries and fishing communities, but that’s only a drop in the ocean, say blue-economy experts. The Ocean Climate ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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Mapping the deep: A new age of exploration 1.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Mapping the deep: A new age of exploration Dawn Wright Wed, 07/01/2020 - 02:00 Did you know that we have far more accurate maps of the moon, Mars and Venus than we do of our own ocean? It wasn’t until 2017 that we were able to help advance the exploration of the world’s ocean with the launch of the world’s first 3D digital map. For the first time, the new developments in mapping and analysis — paired with emerging consciousness about our impact on the environment — provide the knowledge we need to sustain life on both land and sea.  A profoundly new geospatial consciousness is being propelled by new technologies, principally location intelligence, infused with artificial intelligence and turned into a new generation of digital maps. Together, they transform our sense of place.  In every previous ocean map before 3D cartography, we had seen primarily the ocean’s surface. We had measured sea surface temperature. We had tracked movements of wind over that surface. Very few human beings had ever seen more ...
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Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni 29.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni Heather Clancy Mon, 06/29/2020 - 02:30 June 22 marked the publication of the fifth annual GreenBiz 30 Under 30 , our report celebrating rising young professionals in the field of corporate sustainability.  What’s up in the worlds of the 120 alumni from past lists? We reached out this spring to check in, asking those inclined to weigh in on how current events have changed their world views. We asked them to consider two questions: With the world turned upside down, what is your focus at work? Do you think the COVID-19 crisis marks a turning point for the sustainability movement?  Following are some of their responses, lightly edited, representing perspective from all four past cohorts. We did not specifically ask the alumni to consider the broader question of systemic racism, as our outreach was completed prior to the national protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. But look for future updates and essays on this topic, such as ...
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How COVID-19 can shape the response to climate change 13.5.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
How COVID-19 can shape the response to climate change Terry F. Yosie Wed, 05/13/2020 - 02:31 Part Two of a four-part series. Part One can be found here . As the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to unfold, insights are emerging on how to repurpose what's been learned for the benefit of climate change mitigation. To date, most of the focus on the pandemic-environment nexus has been short-term. A number of environmental activists, for example, have recommended that temporarily reduced air pollution levels be made permanent through regulatory controls. Conversely, the Trump administration has used the pandemic as an argument to issue an open-ended suspension of the enforcement of environmental laws. These examples reflect the battle lines being drawn for an even larger conflict that is emerging over climate change policy.  Three key facts Three key facts highlight the growing stakes in play for climate change decision making. First, many parallels exist between arguments that deny the existence ...
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Sustainable infrastructure investments can aid the post-COVID recovery 5.5.2020 GreenBiz.com
Sustainable infrastructure investments can aid the post-COVID recovery Katherine Davisson Tue, 05/05/2020 - 04:23 The economic fallout caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is forcing governments around the world to come up with policies for stimulating the global economy. Many are considering a tried-and-true method to boost economies in the short term and provide wide societal benefits in the long term: infrastructure investment. Countries around the globe are set to launch the biggest round of infrastructure investment since the post-2008 financial crisis stimulus measures. It's easy to see why: Demand is enormous. The world is on-trend to face a  $15 trillion gap between the infrastructure investment needed and the amount provided by 2040 . On the supply side, when 1 percent of GDP is invested in infrastructure,  economic output increases by about 0.4 percent in the same year and by 1.5 percent four years later . Building in a new world Before the shovels hit the dirt, it's worth understanding how the ...
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Clean trucks are more important than ever 5.5.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Cleaning up air pollution drives economic growth.
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Downturn signals opportunity for climate-aligned investing 27.4.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Several frameworks are emerging that sets performance thresholds identifying economic activities that align with the Paris Agreement emissions reduction targets.
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The Park Service is selling out to telecom giants 16.3.2020 High Country News Most Recent
With Trump’s blessing, cell towers are infiltrating protected public lands across the West.
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Native species or invasive? The distinction blurs as the world warms 17.2.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
With species on the move as the climate changes, a growing number of scientists say that efforts must be made to help migrating species adapt to their new habitats.
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Drip, drip, drip: Water is a leading ESG concern 17.2.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Responsible investors are increasingly demanding water-related disclosures, such as measures of how much companies rely on water in their value chains.
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Billionaires are changing communities and the wild in Wyoming 10.2.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Sociologist Justin Farrell explores the ways wealth shapes Teton County and the Western U.S.
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Biodiversity and business: 4 things you need to know for 2020 5.2.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Companies need biodiversity. Most are just recognizing that.
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The new normal: Can business focus on driving positive change? 4.2.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored: If the pace of innovation and level of commitment to building a sustainable future are any indication of future trends, the 2020s will be the decade of circularity.
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Fair Trade USA CEO Paul Rice on conscious capitalism, the plight of U.S. farmers 29.1.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Why the human side of sustainability deserves more attention.
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