User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Development :: International Development
Last updated: Jan 07 2016 20:33 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Bleak Prospects for Latin America Under Trans-Pacific Partnership 7.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Trans-Pacific Partnership, agreed to on October 5, 2015 by the twelve participating countries, is likely to prove disastrous for the Latin American states—Chile, Mexico, and Perú—that have joined the pact up to now. Multinational economic interests based in the United States have exerted extraordinary influence over the accord, inserting language that will arguably serve to damage Latin American interests. Though the TPP has often been presented as a disinterested effort to stimulate basic economic growth and development in the Pacific Rim, the economic principles that underlay the TPP may instead serve to advance the interests of the world's leading corporations. US President Barack Obama promised in a statement that the TPP would slash over 18,000 foreign taxes that the US faces for its exports. [1] Despite being heralded as a path to prosperity for developing countries, eliminating protectionist measures in countries like Chile, Perú, and Mexico could prove to be very harmful. The great nineteenth ...
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Securing Green Finance for Developing Countries 23.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Paris climate change conference was a great success for the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) in many ways, bringing new opportunities going forward and opening the door for partnerships and collaboration with multilateral development banks and the United Nations regional commissions to support developing countries to secure the climate finance they need to move towards a low-carbon, sustainable future. COP21 served as a platform for GGGI to engage with its Members and present its vision for promoting and facilitating green investments to a wider audience through organizing events and participating in numerous activities. A good example is the launch of the Inclusive Green Growth Partnership (IGGP), which attracted a crowd of more than 150 attendees. The IGGP event enlightened many participants to realize the importance of mobilizing green financing in developing and emerging countries to help them to transition to low emission and climate resilient economies. The Partnership, which is a joint ...
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5 Questions for the World Bank on the Meaning of the Paris Climate Deal 18.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the aftermath of the historic Paris climate deal, many people are still trying to decipher what it really means, and how the slim, negotiated document will be put into action. To illuminate the details of this agreement , I interviewed John Roome, Senior Director for Climate Change Group for Cross Cutting Solutions for the World Bank Group: Question 1: What's the World Bank Group's take on the Paris Climate deal? Answer: The word "historic" has undoubtedly become "the" word to describe the Paris agreement on climate change. And it's right. It is remarkable that more than 190 developed and developing countries have come together on a universal agreement to tackle climate change that is both ambitious and leaves no-one behind. It's an ambitious agreement that commits countries to limit warming to "well below 2 degrees Celsius", while calling on all of us to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. This is good for the world, and especially for poor and vulnerable ...
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WTO: Dumping Responsibility on Third World Farmers Yet Again 16.12.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Timothy Wise

On the eve of their Nairobi ministerial, WTO members should remember it is not food procurement policies in developing countries like India but unfair US agricultural subsidies which threaten free trade and farmer livelihoods across the world

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Climate Deception: Non-binding "Targets" for Climate, but Binding Rules on Trade in Services 5.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The whole world is watching as world leaders from nearly every country across the globe meet in Paris this week to set carbon emission reductions targets to address global climate change. Unfortunately representatives of 50 of the same governments are also meeting this week in Geneva to negotiate binding rules that will seriously constrain countries' ability to meet those targets. The 15th round of talks to create a "Trade in Services Agreement," or TiSA, are occurring once again in Geneva. Members of the TiSA currently include Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Hong Kong, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Liechtenstein, Mauritius, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, the U.S., and the 28 member states of the European Union. How come everyone knows about the Paris talks, but not those in Geneva? Because the Geneva talks are convened in secret - precisely because the negotiators don't want the public to know what they're up to. The TiSA is ...
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The cost of helping countries adapt to climate change can't be a dealbreaker in Paris 24.11.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
If negotiations at the Paris climate conference drag on past the December 11 deadline, it will likely be due to wrangling over financing for climate adaptation in developing countries. According to the UN Environmental Program, US$150 billion per year is needed by 2030 (and as much as US$500 billion per year by 2050) to cover the costs of adapting to climate change. Earlier Conferences of the Parties (COPs) have failed due to disagreements between low-income and industrial countries, or ended with compromises worked out in backrooms or in huddles on the floor of the plenary ...
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Paris Can Be a Key Step 22.11.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I returned from a brief trip to Paris two days before the horrific events of November 13th, which have shocked and saddened civilized people everywhere. I was in Paris for discussions regarding climate change policy at OECD headquarters. Now, I'm preparing to return to Paris in less than two weeks with my colleagues from the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements (I've inserted a list of our forthcoming "public" activities at the Paris climate talks at the end of this blog post). My purpose today, in this essay, is to explain why I believe that the Paris talks may turn out to be a key step in the international negotiations, and more important, a significant step in efforts to address the threat of climate change. Background on the Paris Climate Talks The international climate change negotiations that will take place in Paris the first two weeks of December, 2015, are officially the 21st Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change . It will be many years before ...
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Mali: The Shape of Things to Come? 21.11.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Political extremism and terror do not arise in a vacuum. They feed on human suffering and stagnant hopes. Examine Mali closely, because the conditions which have given rise to conflict and terrorism there are prevalent throughout many parts of the developing world. Mali is a cautionary tale. Four years ago, before it became engulfed in conflict, Mali was not a country that evoked a lot of international concern. It tied with Bosnia and Herzegovina for 79th on the 2012 Failed States Index, right behind India. Despite a very high rate of poverty, no one would have described Mali as a hotbed of political extremism or a candidate for civil war. Yet, Mali today finds itself on the front lines of the global fight against terror. And what happened this week in Mali is happening in other developing countries that are struggling against great odds to alleviate poverty and human suffering. The population of Mali, which was the fourth poorest country in the world last year according the UN's Multidimensional Poverty ...
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Life and Death on the Line as Rich Nations Evade Climate Obligations 22.10.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Rich nations are blockading efforts to reach consensus on financial climate pledges in Bonn, Germany this week as the upcoming United Nations climate talks approach—a move which could derail the entire process, a bloc of developing nations said Thursday.

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Can Nations Reach a Strong Agreement at COP 21? 15.10.2015 Truthout.com
Editor's note: 2015 is a pivotal year with respect to climate change as growing concern about impacts converges with a critical stage in the decades-long process of shaping an international agreement to alter our trajectory. In preparation for the 21st gathering of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 21) in Paris beginning Nov. 30, Ensia is publishing a series of context pieces from longtime observer and reporter Fiona Harvey. This fourth installment provides a look at preparations for the conference and what key questions need to be resolved for the conference to succeed. For more explainers, check out the other features in the series: Everything you always wanted to know about the UN climate talks but were afraid to ask , We're headed to Paris, but where did we come from? and As we prepare for the UN climate talks, a look at what's changed since Copenhagen . Scientists agree: we need to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions drastically in the ...
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What the Trans-Pacific Partnership means for the cost of drugs 13.10.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
What the Trans-Pacific Partnership means for the cost of drugs
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GPS for the SDGs 24.9.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Extreme poverty can be eradicated, everywhere, within 15 years -- if we can achieve the new Sustainable Development Goals. That means we have 800 weeks to lift 800 million people out of extreme poverty. The breadth and ambition of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is vast -- so much so that many have questioned whether the 17 SDGs are actually attainable. I firmly believe they are. Through their forerunners, the Millennium Development Goals, we have halved the proportion of those living in extreme poverty, and most people are now better educated and enjoying longer and healthier lives than ever before. We can certainly achieve more. Yet, moving from the MDGs to the SDGs will mean doing things differently. We will not achieve these new, ambitious goals unless we make our development partnerships smarter and more equal. The role of private businesses, civil-society and philanthropic foundations will be crucial in meeting the new objectives, and governments will need to work much more closely with ...
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An Unstoppable Force for Good 24.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
World leaders have a historic opportunity to end extreme poverty, reduce inequality, promote peace and justice, and safeguard the environment this September 25 when they sign off on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Unprecedented in their scope and ambition, the SDGs will test the resolve of the international community over the next 15 years in the universal endeavor to create a better world for all. Success or failure will depend in large measure on SDG 17, which seeks to revitalize the global partnership for development. Goal 17 is in many ways the glue that binds the SDGs together. It is the most content heavy of the goals, and divided into five significant components, each of which is integral to the success of the SDG framework: finance, technology, capacity building, trade and systemic issues. The issue of finance is an important one, as many developed countries are failing to live up to the commitment to allocate 0.7 percent of their Gross National Income as Official Development Assistance ...
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GPS for the SDGs 24.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Extreme poverty can be eradicated, everywhere, within 15 years -- if we can achieve the new Sustainable Development Goals. That means we have 800 weeks to lift 800 million people out of extreme poverty. The breadth and ambition of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is vast -- so much so that many have questioned whether the 17 SDGs are actually attainable. I firmly believe they are. Through their forerunners, the Millennium Development Goals, we have halved the proportion of those living in extreme poverty, and most people are now better educated and enjoying longer and healthier lives than ever before. We can certainly achieve more. Yet, moving from the MDGs to the SDGs will mean doing things differently. We will not achieve these new, ambitious goals unless we make our development partnerships smarter and more equal. The role of private businesses, civil-society and philanthropic foundations will be crucial in meeting the new objectives, and governments will need to work much more closely with ...
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Great Danes Leading by Example on Renewable Energy 10.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Addressing the World's growing demand for energy will be one of the major challenges in the coming decades. Already today, the global demand for affordable, reliable and sustainable energy is not met -- and the International Energy Agency predicts global-energy demand will increase by more than one third before 2035. This is actually good news, because energy to a large extent is used to fuel a positive trend in developing countries where economies are growing, production is increasing and millions of people are pulled out of poverty and join the -- energy consuming -- middle class. However, there is also some bad news. Outdated production facilities are not able to deliver reliable and affordable energy. Too many people are cut off from access to modern energy altogether. This hurts economies in the developing world. The outdated production of energy has a negative impact on our environment and contributes to man-made climate change. If we don't act, these problems will not only stay unsolved -- they ...
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Where's the Missing Part, Naomi Klein? Ask Pope Francis and Mohammed Mesbahi 30.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Why Investing in Infrastructure in Developing Countries Will Benefit Us All 12.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The world is awash in capital, commodities and debt. But rather than conjuring up images of abundance, this toxic conflagration of geoeconomic realities has led many commentators to forecast that the next financial meltdown is just around the corner. One potential choke point in the global economy is the Western export of debt to emerging markets, and the purchasing of debt in the West by emerging market countries. In the wake of the 2008 Great Recession, Western fund managers eagerly sold forms of credit financing to developing markets. Total emerging-market debt soared to $49 trillion in 2014, representing nearly half of the growth in global debt since 2007. As well as accruing debt in their homelands, the commodities "super-cycle" of the 2000s enabled many of these natural resource-rich countries to pour billions of dollars into debt structures in the developed world. According to research by the Financial Times, there has been a rise of $1.7 trillion in EM reserves since the end of 2004, a ...
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With Zero Accountability, Big Oil Wringing Profit from Developing Countries 16.7.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Global Tax Body: An Idea Whose Time Has Come 11.7.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Two remarkable global victories deserve attention in Canada 3.7.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Friday, July 3, 2015 In the past week the IMF released a report admitting strong pro-capitalist politics don't work and a dutch judge sided with citizens to slash carbon emissions. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Two remarkable developments in the past week that could have a significant impact in many countries are worth a lot more attention in Canada and the United ...
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