User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Development :: International Development
Last updated: Apr 23 2015 14:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Small yet BIG: The Basic Income Guarantee 23.4.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Leon Schreiber (ZA), Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science, Freie Universität Berlin A SILENT REVOLUTION From the thirsty plains of the Namib to the seemingly impervious jungles of the Amazon and the cramped slums of Seemapuri, a revolution is quietly brewing. A small idea that appears almost self-evident has taken root in some of the world's forgotten corners. In contrast to the convoluted development theories of structural adjustment, economic convergence, and trickle-down - all of which ultimately aim to ensure that everyone has enough money - this idea offers but a single proposal to help address the destitution of so many millions: If we want to live in a world that is free from poverty and where the poor are able to become wealth creators, then by definition, everyone needs to have at least some money. This once utopian vision is gaining ground, fast. A global network of academics, activists, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and private groups are working towards the implementation of Basic ...
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From Basic Income to Social Dividends: Sharing the Value of Common Resources 20.3.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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8 Ways to Reduce Global Inequality 27.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Keeping Food Security on the Table at UN Climate Talks 14.2.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Correcting the Wall Street Journal on Climate (Again) 3.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Bjorn Lomborg 's latest op-ed in the Wall Street Journal resurrects repeatedly demolished distortions of fact to downplay the real and increasingly documented threats of climate change. His trademark tactic is to acknowledge that climate change is real and human-caused, only to then dismiss the solutions -- reducing emissions and promoting clean energy now -- as unnecessary or infeasible. Fortunately, his longstanding fight against climate action is failing to persuade the public, as an overwhelming majority of Americans understand that climate change is a serious threat and that we're already feeling the impacts. More to the point, they support action to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, especially through continued expansion of clean energy and new rules for coal-fired power plants. Mr. Lomborg has relied on similar distortions for his arguments many times before, even drawing censure from the Danish government for his "perversion of the scientific method." After the release of Lomborg's " deeply flawed ...
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Correcting Wall Street Journal on Climate (Again) 3.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is a guest post by Climate Nexus . Bjorn Lomborg 's latest op-ed in the Wall Street Journal resurrects repeatedly demolished distortions of fact to downplay the real and increasingly documented threats of climate change. His trademark tactic is to acknowledge that climate change is real and human-caused, only to then dismiss the solutions--reducing emissions and promoting clean energy now--as unnecessary or infeasible. Fortunately, his longstanding fight against climate action is failing to persuade the public, as an overwhelming majority of Americans understand that climate change is a serious threat and that we're already feeling the impacts. More to the point they support action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, especially through continued expansion of clean energy and new rules for coal-fired power plants. Mr. Lomborg has relied on similar distortions for his arguments many times before, even drawing censure from the Danish government for his "perversion of the scientific method." After the ...
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Why Developing Countries are Disproportionately Affected by Climate Change -- and What Can They Do About it 21.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If there is something today that nobody, regardless of socio-economic status, ethnicity or race, can run away from, it is the issue of climate change. In particular, the world's poorest people are most vulnerable to the devastating effects climate change. Unlike people of wealthier developed countries, the people of the developing world do not have the means to fight global climate change. They will be the first and worst to be hit. A temperature rise of 2 to 4 degrees will cause a decreased yield in agriculture and increase rural-to-urban migration that will eventually lead to political unrest in already unstable governments. This is currently happening in places like my home country of Kenya. Over the last few years, the weather patterns have been changing and becoming more unpredictable. According to the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), it is not just droughts that are causing continuous food insecurity in Africa but rather, it is the minor climate shifts that have ...
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Rich Countries Pony Up (Some) for Climate Justice 25.11.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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'Drop in the Bucket': Experts Say Obama Climate Fund Pledge Far Short of What Is Owed 14.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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US/India WTO Agreement: How Corporate Greed Trumps Needs of World's Poor and Hungry 14.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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The Tradeoffs of Tax Dodging 14.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The gap between the rich and the poor is extreme and growing. In fact, the number of billionaires across the globe has actually doubled since the 2008 financial crisis. Extreme inequality is a defining issue of our time but it is not inevitable; it is the consequence of political choices. There are tradeoffs. As the leaders of the world's largest 20 economies gather in Australia this weekend, they have the opportunity to make the right ones. They can start by acknowledging that inequality is derailing the fight against poverty and threatening economic growth. In fact, G20 countries are now home to more than half the world's poorest people. Then the G20 countries can take action by cracking down on the use of tax havens and tax dodging by multinational corporations. Having recently launched a new campaign to address inequality , Oxfam calculated that poor countries miss out on about US $100 billion each year because of corporate tax avoidance and tax breaks. That's enough to provide health care and ...
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The Right to Food: An Interview With Hilal Elver 8.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Hilal Elver is the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. She grew up in Turkey, where she earned her Ph.D. from the University of Ankara Law School and began her teaching career. Her expertise was soon pressed into government service when the Turkish government appointed her as the founding legal advisor to the Ministry of the Environment. Later, they asked her to serve as the General Director of Women's Status. She was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to the University of Michigan Ann Arbor Law School, where she worked on the International Environmental Law Convention on Hazardous Materials and International Rivers. Following that work, she was appointed by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) as Chair of Environmental Diplomacy at University of Malta. Returning to the U.S. in 1996, she resumed her university teaching career, while continuing to work on environmental issues, human security, climate change, and food security. She also earned a Doctor of Judicial Science (SJD) ...
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Global Tax-Evasion Crackdown Sidestepping Poorest Countries 7.11.2014 Truthout.com
Washington - While a major global campaign to cut down on tax evasion is picking up momentum, anti-poverty advocates say the initiative overlooks the world's poorest countries. Last week, 51 countries from four continents agreed to systematically exchange tax information by 2017, with the aim of allowing authorities to quickly register any disparities. Several dozen additional countries – 89 in total – said they would follow suit by the following year, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), a grouping of wealthy countries that is spearheading the project. Global tax evasion has risen to the top of the global agenda in the aftermath of the 2007-08 financial crisis and the resulting financial constrictions felt by governments around the world. Though last week's pledges will still need to be underpinned by separate bilateral agreements, the new accord is being lauded as a major step forward on the issue. "This great success in the fight against international tax ...
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5 Reasons Why Climate Change Is a Social Issue, Not Just an Environmental One 7.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As illustrated by the 400,000 attendees at the People's Climate March in New York City and the solidarity events that took place around the word, the realities of climate change are no longer only being stressed by environmentalists. The effects of climate change will be economic, social, and environmental and will alter people's lives in a myriad of ways that we are just beginning to understand. Acceptance of this complex interaction, which follows the prescription laid out by the concept of sustainable development, is key to beginning to enact effective policy on climate. Since the recent New Climate Economy Report focused on climate change through an economic lens, it is time to facilitate discussion on the social effects. Here are 5 reasons why climate change needs to be considered a social issue as well: 1. Small farmers will feel the effects Small farmers already struggle to get a fair price for their goods, safeguard against weather & pests, and compete with large-scale monoculture agricultural ...
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How Did Leaders Respond to the People's Climate March? 26.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
About 400,000 people went to the streets on September 21st to ask for real actions to address climate change. It was the greatest climate march in history. The UN Climate Summit organized by Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon took place two days later with the participation of 100 heads of state and 800 leaders from business. How did this Summit react to the demands of the peoples climate march? Did it meet the expectations? According to Ban Ki-Moon and other leaders, it was a success. To see if that is true, we should look at: 1) what science is telling us; 2) the previous commitments made by governments; and 3) how these commitments at the UN have improved in order to address the mismatch between what has to be done and what is being done. The main point of reference for any assessment is the greenhouse gas emissions gap for this decade. What we do now is more important than what we will do in the next decade or in 2050. If we don't close the emission gap by 2020, we will lose the possibility to catch up ...
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Climate-Smart Agriculture is Corporate Green-Washing, Warn NGOs 25.9.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Future of WTO Negotiations Hangs in the Balance at G20 Trade Ministers' Meeting 19.7.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On July 19, Trade Ministers from the G20 group of countries -- including Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Mexico, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, United Kingdom, the United States and the European Union (EU) -- will convene for their annual meeting in Sydney, Australia. Decisions taken at the G20 are not binding on members, which is why the gathering has lost steam from its origins in the aftermath of the global economic crisis. But the meetings can be used to build consensus toward positions that can be brought back to forums where decisions can be enforced, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO). And this is exactly what the United States plans to do. At the WTO Ministerial last December in Bali, members agreed to the first expansion of the WTO since its coming into existence in 1995. The new agreement on "Trade Facilitation" would set binding rules on customs procedures and trade ...
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Nobel Economist Joseph Stiglitz Hails New BRICS Bank Challenging US-Dominated World Bank and IMF 18.7.2014 Truthout.com
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IMF Paper: Corporate Tax Avoidance Hurts Global Economy and Poor Countries 25.6.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) released a staff paper noting that corporate tax avoidance negatively impacts all economies, but hurts developing countries the most. The IMF's release comes as the G20, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and United Nations bodies seek vehicles to diminish corporate tax avoidance.

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Fossil Fuel Giants Hijacking UN's Green Energy Fund: Critics 11.6.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines

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