User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Development :: International Development
Last updated: Nov 30 2018 16:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How developing countries put forests on the climate agenda 2.10.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Nearly a quarter of all the greenhouse gases emitted by man come from the way we manage our forests, farms and fields.
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How developing countries are insuring against climate disasters 9.9.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
To help countries cope with disaster, new tools have emerged over the last decade, including 'sovereign parametric insurance.'
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Will power: Developing countries are driving the renewables transition, says BNEF 30.11.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
A new report shows a dramatic shift in global energy markets.
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Can results-based climate finance prevent adversity? 30.7.2018 GreenBiz.com
Estimates show that $5.7 trillion in green investment is needed annually by 2020 in developing nations for climate action.
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What business can do to close the financial inclusion gender gap 30.5.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
At our current pace, it will take 18 years for all women to use financial services to save, borrow and protect themselves against downturns.
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Here's how cities in developing countries can tap green bonds 28.4.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Many city leaders already are working to finance resilience projects through green bonds.
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The US Protects Its Wealthy Professionals Financially While Throwing Workers to the Wolves 18.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Talent and hard work have very little to do with why the rich get richer, says economist Dean Baker. In this exclusive Truthout interview, he discusses how Wall Street and Washington have structured the "free" market to favor the rich; why patent monopolies stifle innovation; and Trump's Carrier jobs scam. The New York Stock Exchange, pictured June 12, 2012. The free market is a myth. There is only a rigged market. (Photo: Dan Nguyen / Flickr ) The wealth disparity in the United States is astonishing, yet many have come to accept it as almost natural. In his new book, Dean Baker debunks the inevitability of this disparity, exposing the economics of a rigged system and offering hope to those who want a global economy that works for everyone. Get your copy of Rigged by making a tax-deductible donation to Truthout today!  The following interview with frequent Truthout commentator and economist Dean Baker (of the Center for Economic Policy and Research) drills deep into the fiction of capitalism being an ...
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At COP22, It Is Important To Ensure That Climate Finance Meets Africa's Needs 22.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change is the biggest problem we have ever had to face, as communities, countries and the planet. This means it is an expensive problem given that adjusting economies to limit greenhouse gas emissions costs money; so too does adapting agriculture, water use and coastlines. Developing countries, of which most of Africa is a part, just don't have that kind of money. That's the main reason global climate deals, which culminated in the Paris Agreement last year, have stipulated that developed countries need to come up with USD100 billion a year by 2020 in "climate finance" for developing countries. Climate finance alone will not resolve the climate crisis, and some experts say USD100 billion will not be sufficient. But the USD100 billion target is extremely important for African countries. At this year's global climate talks (COP22) in Marrakesh (Morocco), it is vital that countries finalise the recently published "roadmap" showing how the target will be reached. ©Greenpeace African countries need to ...
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Why The Debate On Trade Should Worry Development Communities 28.10.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Trade has assumed a remarkably prominent position in the US presidential election. In past elections, few topics seemed to dull public attention like tariffs and trade barriers, which meant that politicians typically focused on divisive social issues like abortion and gun control. But trade isn't the clear-cut issue cleanly divided along partisan lines that abortion and gun control are. It featured as much as a core theme in Donald Trump's campaign as it did in Bernie Sanders' run for Democratic nominee. Both candidates used it to appeal across their voter bases, from small manufacturing business owners to unemployed autoworkers. The focus on trade has been such an effective strategy that it's even forced Hillary Clinton to reverse her once-strong support of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Clearly, the debate on trade has proved constructive in a number of ways. It's highlighted the compromises made on behalf of unfettered globalization, and ...
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As Deadline Looms, WikiLeaks Reveals Corporate Demands from the European Union in the Trade in Services Agreement 15.10.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Deborah James

Friday, for the first time, WikiLeaks released demands by the EU to lock in a wide list of services sectors to TISA’s privatization and deregulation provisions, including public services in developing countries. In the mid-2000s, when European campaigners leaked similar demands during corporate efforts to expand the General Agreement on Trade in Services, the EU was forced to walk back many of those demands.

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Finance, Renewable Energy And Social Inclusion Are Key To A Sustainable Future 5.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When opening the Climate Summit in Copenhagen, I quote one of my favorite Guyanese creole sayings: wan wan dutty build dam. Put differently, every house must sit on solid foundations and we build it one brick at a time. Many years later, the Paris Climate agreement brought us the international breakthrough many have fought for so hard: near universal action to address climate change and keep global average temperature well below 2 degrees centigrade. Of course it was the euphoria of the outcome that made the headlines. But the Paris agreement also noted some important points of caution. First that the commitments made in Paris are not enough to achieve the temperature goal, second that early action is imperative and thirdly that the provision of finance, technology and capacity support are essential to enable enhanced pre-2020 action by developing countries. As early as 2018 countries will meet to take stock of efforts taken to meet the long term goal. If Paris was all about setting the goal(s) and ...
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America's Third World Nation 12.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
There is a Third World nation of 45 million inside the United States -- the population of Kenya -- who live in poverty without adequate health, education, housing, and social benefits. Despite this, candidate Bernie Sanders has found it difficult to gain traction for his anti-poverty policies in the Democratic primary in states where income inequality is highest. The recent exception is West Virginia where he won a resounding victory. America's impoverished grows. There is no trickle-down benefit for them, due to many reasons, but voting absence represents yet another obstacle. Sanders during his primary campaign has pointed out that poor people don't vote and points to the fact that (until West Virginia) he has lost his primary bid in 16 of the most unequal states in the union. "That's a sad reality of American society and that's what we have to transform... in America today, the last election in 2014, 80 percent of poor people did not vote," he said on the campaign trail. Politifact said exactly 75 ...
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World Bank May Be Spreading The Scourge That Fed Flint Water Crisis 12.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Gwen Moore (D-Wis.) is calling out the World Bank's investment in global water resources, alleging conflicts of interest similar to those that removed Flint, Michigan, from managing its own water.  Moore, ranking member on the House Monetary Policy and Trade Subcommittee, on Tuesday condemned the World Bank’s funding and promotion of water privatization through "public private partnerships" arranged by its investment arm, the International Finance Corp., or IFC. “I am increasingly uneasy with water resource privatization in developing countries and do not believe that the current ring-­fencing policies separating the investment and advising functions of the IFC are adequate,” Moore wrote in a letter to World Bank President Jim Yong Kim. Moore's committee has jurisdiction over the World Bank. The IFC’s purpose is to advise and invest with private companies to advance work in developing countries. But Moore, backed by watchdog group Corporate Accountability International, argued the ...
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A Plan to Tackle a Changing Climate 12.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When the rains came to Senegal's capital and largest city, Dakar, in 2009, the people in Cite de Soleil were up to their chests in water. Even today you can still see the water marks on the walls. People who live there today still talk of the stench, the diarrhea, and the chest ailments suffered by the children. Travel along the coast and the impact of increased erosion on tourism spots is all too evident. Go inland and you see people having to cope with significant droughts and shorter growing seasons. It's all too evident that people, particularly poor people, are already suffering the effects of weather-induced stresses. And looking forward, the climate models suggest that this will only get worse with more extreme rainfall likely in Dakar, stronger coastal erosion, reduced fishing opportunities, and more extreme drought conditions inland. Senegal is trying to tackle these issues, often with the help of the World Bank. One project is putting in place infrastructure to help manage the floods. It seems ...
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The Cuban Health System at the Dawn of Détente 23.3.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
President Obama's visit to Cuba this week once again focused the eyes of the world on the island nation. After the initial rapprochement in 2014, several major U.S. outlets highlighted the country's health care system , unique to the Third World, and one which, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, "has solved some problems that ours has not yet managed to address." Sound heretical? Not to those who have studied it. Cuba's health performance Cuba, a country of 11 million people, has achieved health outcomes that are the envy of the Third World. It has one of the lowest infant and young child (under age 5) mortality rates and longest life expectancies in the Americas, outperforming the U.S. on all three of these indicators (although the maternal mortality rate is still considerably higher than that in rich countries). This year, Cuba also became the first nation in the world that, according to the World Health Organization, had eliminated mother-to-child transmission of HIV and ...
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Vulture Funds Put to UN Human Rights Test 26.2.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Debt campaigners hold a pots and pans protest against vulture fund attack on Argentina in New York, February 26, 2013. (Photo: Jubilee Debt Campaign ) Inequality is rising at an alarming pace everywhere. Less than 62 people own as much as the poorest half of the world's population. At their current pace of accumulation the richest 1 percent could soon own everything. While some international development NGOs are raising the alarm, many human rights organizations are staunchly silent, failing to hold states and corporations to account in their obligations to protect economic and social rights. This is particularly clear in the realm of business and human rights, where developing countries such as Ecuador are leading initiatives for accountability, while NGOs such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch remain quiet. Countries most hit by predatory business and investment practices are seeking to put mass inequality under a microscope. This week, the UN Human Rights Council's Advisory Committee on ...
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Bleak Prospects for Latin America Under Trans-Pacific Partnership 7.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Trans-Pacific Partnership, agreed to on October 5, 2015 by the twelve participating countries, is likely to prove disastrous for the Latin American states—Chile, Mexico, and Perú—that have joined the pact up to now. Multinational economic interests based in the United States have exerted extraordinary influence over the accord, inserting language that will arguably serve to damage Latin American interests. Though the TPP has often been presented as a disinterested effort to stimulate basic economic growth and development in the Pacific Rim, the economic principles that underlay the TPP may instead serve to advance the interests of the world's leading corporations. US President Barack Obama promised in a statement that the TPP would slash over 18,000 foreign taxes that the US faces for its exports. [1] Despite being heralded as a path to prosperity for developing countries, eliminating protectionist measures in countries like Chile, Perú, and Mexico could prove to be very harmful. The great nineteenth ...
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Securing Green Finance for Developing Countries 23.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Paris climate change conference was a great success for the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) in many ways, bringing new opportunities going forward and opening the door for partnerships and collaboration with multilateral development banks and the United Nations regional commissions to support developing countries to secure the climate finance they need to move towards a low-carbon, sustainable future. COP21 served as a platform for GGGI to engage with its Members and present its vision for promoting and facilitating green investments to a wider audience through organizing events and participating in numerous activities. A good example is the launch of the Inclusive Green Growth Partnership (IGGP), which attracted a crowd of more than 150 attendees. The IGGP event enlightened many participants to realize the importance of mobilizing green financing in developing and emerging countries to help them to transition to low emission and climate resilient economies. The Partnership, which is a joint ...
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5 Questions for the World Bank on the Meaning of the Paris Climate Deal 18.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the aftermath of the historic Paris climate deal, many people are still trying to decipher what it really means, and how the slim, negotiated document will be put into action. To illuminate the details of this agreement , I interviewed John Roome, Senior Director for Climate Change Group for Cross Cutting Solutions for the World Bank Group: Question 1: What's the World Bank Group's take on the Paris Climate deal? Answer: The word "historic" has undoubtedly become "the" word to describe the Paris agreement on climate change. And it's right. It is remarkable that more than 190 developed and developing countries have come together on a universal agreement to tackle climate change that is both ambitious and leaves no-one behind. It's an ambitious agreement that commits countries to limit warming to "well below 2 degrees Celsius", while calling on all of us to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. This is good for the world, and especially for poor and vulnerable ...
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WTO: Dumping Responsibility on Third World Farmers Yet Again 16.12.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Timothy Wise

On the eve of their Nairobi ministerial, WTO members should remember it is not food procurement policies in developing countries like India but unfair US agricultural subsidies which threaten free trade and farmer livelihoods across the world

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