User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Development :: International Development
Last updated: Nov 15 2014 23:10 IST RSS 2.0
 
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'Drop in the Bucket': Experts Say Obama Climate Fund Pledge Far Short of What Is Owed 14.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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US/India WTO Agreement: How Corporate Greed Trumps Needs of World's Poor and Hungry 14.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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The Tradeoffs of Tax Dodging 14.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The gap between the rich and the poor is extreme and growing. In fact, the number of billionaires across the globe has actually doubled since the 2008 financial crisis. Extreme inequality is a defining issue of our time but it is not inevitable; it is the consequence of political choices. There are tradeoffs. As the leaders of the world's largest 20 economies gather in Australia this weekend, they have the opportunity to make the right ones. They can start by acknowledging that inequality is derailing the fight against poverty and threatening economic growth. In fact, G20 countries are now home to more than half the world's poorest people. Then the G20 countries can take action by cracking down on the use of tax havens and tax dodging by multinational corporations. Having recently launched a new campaign to address inequality , Oxfam calculated that poor countries miss out on about US $100 billion each year because of corporate tax avoidance and tax breaks. That's enough to provide health care and ...
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The Right to Food: An Interview With Hilal Elver 8.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Hilal Elver is the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. She grew up in Turkey, where she earned her Ph.D. from the University of Ankara Law School and began her teaching career. Her expertise was soon pressed into government service when the Turkish government appointed her as the founding legal advisor to the Ministry of the Environment. Later, they asked her to serve as the General Director of Women's Status. She was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to the University of Michigan Ann Arbor Law School, where she worked on the International Environmental Law Convention on Hazardous Materials and International Rivers. Following that work, she was appointed by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) as Chair of Environmental Diplomacy at University of Malta. Returning to the U.S. in 1996, she resumed her university teaching career, while continuing to work on environmental issues, human security, climate change, and food security. She also earned a Doctor of Judicial Science (SJD) ...
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Global Tax-Evasion Crackdown Sidestepping Poorest Countries 7.11.2014 Truthout.com
Washington - While a major global campaign to cut down on tax evasion is picking up momentum, anti-poverty advocates say the initiative overlooks the world's poorest countries. Last week, 51 countries from four continents agreed to systematically exchange tax information by 2017, with the aim of allowing authorities to quickly register any disparities. Several dozen additional countries – 89 in total – said they would follow suit by the following year, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), a grouping of wealthy countries that is spearheading the project. Global tax evasion has risen to the top of the global agenda in the aftermath of the 2007-08 financial crisis and the resulting financial constrictions felt by governments around the world. Though last week's pledges will still need to be underpinned by separate bilateral agreements, the new accord is being lauded as a major step forward on the issue. "This great success in the fight against international tax ...
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5 Reasons Why Climate Change Is a Social Issue, Not Just an Environmental One 7.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As illustrated by the 400,000 attendees at the People's Climate March in New York City and the solidarity events that took place around the word, the realities of climate change are no longer only being stressed by environmentalists. The effects of climate change will be economic, social, and environmental and will alter people's lives in a myriad of ways that we are just beginning to understand. Acceptance of this complex interaction, which follows the prescription laid out by the concept of sustainable development, is key to beginning to enact effective policy on climate. Since the recent New Climate Economy Report focused on climate change through an economic lens, it is time to facilitate discussion on the social effects. Here are 5 reasons why climate change needs to be considered a social issue as well: 1. Small farmers will feel the effects Small farmers already struggle to get a fair price for their goods, safeguard against weather & pests, and compete with large-scale monoculture agricultural ...
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How Did Leaders Respond to the People's Climate March? 26.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
About 400,000 people went to the streets on September 21st to ask for real actions to address climate change. It was the greatest climate march in history. The UN Climate Summit organized by Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon took place two days later with the participation of 100 heads of state and 800 leaders from business. How did this Summit react to the demands of the peoples climate march? Did it meet the expectations? According to Ban Ki-Moon and other leaders, it was a success. To see if that is true, we should look at: 1) what science is telling us; 2) the previous commitments made by governments; and 3) how these commitments at the UN have improved in order to address the mismatch between what has to be done and what is being done. The main point of reference for any assessment is the greenhouse gas emissions gap for this decade. What we do now is more important than what we will do in the next decade or in 2050. If we don't close the emission gap by 2020, we will lose the possibility to catch up ...
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Climate-Smart Agriculture is Corporate Green-Washing, Warn NGOs 25.9.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Future of WTO Negotiations Hangs in the Balance at G20 Trade Ministers' Meeting 19.7.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On July 19, Trade Ministers from the G20 group of countries -- including Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Mexico, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, United Kingdom, the United States and the European Union (EU) -- will convene for their annual meeting in Sydney, Australia. Decisions taken at the G20 are not binding on members, which is why the gathering has lost steam from its origins in the aftermath of the global economic crisis. But the meetings can be used to build consensus toward positions that can be brought back to forums where decisions can be enforced, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO). And this is exactly what the United States plans to do. At the WTO Ministerial last December in Bali, members agreed to the first expansion of the WTO since its coming into existence in 1995. The new agreement on "Trade Facilitation" would set binding rules on customs procedures and trade ...
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Nobel Economist Joseph Stiglitz Hails New BRICS Bank Challenging US-Dominated World Bank and IMF 18.7.2014 Truthout.com
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IMF Paper: Corporate Tax Avoidance Hurts Global Economy and Poor Countries 25.6.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) released a staff paper noting that corporate tax avoidance negatively impacts all economies, but hurts developing countries the most. The IMF's release comes as the G20, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and United Nations bodies seek vehicles to diminish corporate tax avoidance.

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Fossil Fuel Giants Hijacking UN's Green Energy Fund: Critics 11.6.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines

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The Future of Energy in Turkey 14.5.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Over the next eight to twelve months, David Kroodsma and Lindsey Fransen are riding their bikes across parts of Asia , and sharing what they learn about the climate issues facing the countries they bike through. Turkey's economy has transformed over the past few decades. In 1960, according to the World Bank, the country's GDP per capita was just over $250 -- roughly the level of the poorest country on earth today. Now the average Turk is more than 40 times wealthier, and the country is, by many standards, a developed nation. The past decade has been particularly prosperous, with the economy more than doubling. And as we've traveled around Istanbul, we've seen signs everywhere of this growth: new buildings, packed shopping malls, and new roads. Unsurprisingly, energy consumption has also increased many times, and greenhouse gas emissions have increased by more than 20-fold since 1960. And there's still room to grow -- the average Turk still uses about one fifth as much electricity as the average U.S. ...
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Does Debt Forgiveness Work? Ask Africa 14.5.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
When countries in sub-Saharan Africa ("Africa" for short) gained independence in the 1960s, they inherited little or no public debt. And they stayed relatively debt-free until the early 1980s. Then, they went on a borrowing binge. By mid-1990s, the average African nation owed more than the value of all the goods and services it could produce in a year. The loans, which had to be paid back in foreign currency, came mostly from foreign governments and multilateral institutions, not from private bankers. The money was to build things like roads, ports, and power plants; this would speed up economic development and create the capacity to repay. It sounded sensible. Well, that capacity to repay never really materialized. Corruption, natural disasters, wars, bad policies, and bad luck made it impossible for African governments to keep up with debt payments without cutting basic services to their people, who were already poor and getting few services in the first place. The image of rich countries forcing poor ...
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What Can Foreign Investment Really Do for Your Country? 1.4.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
When a respectable multinational company announces a new project in a poor country, it is usually a cause for celebration -- especially when the project won't hurt the environment and won't corrupt public officials. These companies create jobs, pay taxes, and bring badly-needed foreign currency. More subtly, they use better technologies, spread their knowledge, and hire local firms to supply them. This, one hopes, makes everyone more productive, even those that have little or no contact with the newcomers. Think of an international clothing brand coming to your town to set up a factory and export top-end apparel, or a mining giant breaking ground near your village to mine for copper and sell it abroad. They generate benefits that go beyond their own businesses -- in technical jargon, they generate "spill-overs" for the rest of the economy. So, sensible governments do their best to attract "foreign direct investment." But, what evidence do we have that these spill-overs really exist? A new book edited ...
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Reforming International Tax System Must be Priority of G20 22.2.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire

The G20 must take necessary steps to reform the international taxation system to stop wealthy tax dodgers, beginning at its Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors meeting this weekend (22-23 Feb) in Sydney.

Oxfam says that billions of dollars are lost each year in tax loopholes and avoidance. This gap must be plugged. Much of this money should be spent on services such as health and education in developing countries, helping to lift people out of poverty and reduce their dependence on aid.

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Global Fight for Land Rights at Tipping Point 6.2.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines

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China Has Good Reason to Help Stabilize Latin American Economies 31.1.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
China Has Good Reason to Help Stabilize Latin American Economies
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In WTO Deal 'Corporate Rights Trump the Right of People to Food' 7.12.2013 CommonDreams.org Headlines
A World Trade Organization (WTO) deal appears imminent on Friday after the 159-member body held its Ninth Ministerial Meeting in Bali. While some are cheering the deal as "historic" after India held firm on a food security program, skeptics say the deal is a continuation of global trade policies in which "corporate "rights" trump the right of people to food." read ...
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Drawing the Lines in Bali: Global South Must Demand No Less Than Development Justice 5.12.2013 Commondreams.org Views
Antonio Tujan Jr. An activist wraps his face during a protest against the World Trade Organization meeting in Bali, Indonesia on Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013. Indonesia is hosting the World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference from Dec. 3 - 6. The word "Gerak" means Movement. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati) BALI, Indonesia — Lines have been drawn as world leaders gather in Bali for the World Trade Organization"s ninth summit. read ...
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