User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Development :: Community Development
Last updated: Oct 23 2018 15:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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More people are seeking out mental health care, but psychiatrists are in short supply: 'It's getting worse' 22.3.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
Medical student Mila Grossman had just begun her first clinical rotation when she started to get an idea of what kind of doctor she wanted to be. Working at a women’s mental health clinic, she met a new mom who appeared put-together but inwardly suffered from painful postpartum ...
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We Are All Fast Food Workers Now 21.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! "Many people are angered by the cruelties of the twenty-first-century economy. And their fury has fueled worldwide protest. Simultaneously, and almost everywhere, low-wage workers and small farmers began to revolt: in New York City restaurants, laundries, and warehouses, in Western Cape wineries and the garment shops of Phnom Penh, in Southern California Walmarts, and the big hotels of Providence, Oslo, Karachi, and Abuja. As capital has globalized, so has the labor movement. Marches, strikes, protests, and sit-ins from Tampa to Mali have changed the global conversation about workers' rights." So writes Annelise Orleck in her new book We Are All Fast Food Workers Now: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages -- which, as she explains on this week's episode of Off-Kilter, tells the story behind the growing global labor movement ...
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An Illinois town celebrates as Trump's tariffs prompt U.S. Steel to bring jobs back 9.3.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
There’s hope coming back to Granite City. The small Illinois steel town outside St. Louis felt the bedrock shift in 2015 when one of its biggest and best-paying employers, U.S. Steel, said it would idle its Granite City plant and cut 2,000 jobs. On Wednesday, the company said it will restart ...
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Fear, anxiety, apprehension: undocumented immigrants fear doctor visits could leave them vulnerable to deportation 22.2.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
The man’s toe had turned from deep purple to black by the time his family went to the emergency room. Soon they would discover it was gangrene, a complication of undiagnosed diabetes, and a portion of the toe would be amputated. But before that, as the days passed and the toe blackened, the ...
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A town clings to its small-town identity under pressure 9.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Manhattan, Montana, has become a bedroom community with full schools but few businesses.
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When a town wants to grow — but not too quickly 8.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Three Forks has weathered much. Facing new pressures, can it stay in control?
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How Economic Distress Impacts Your Health 1.2.2018 Truthout.com
You'll never see a paywall at Truthout and we'll never artificially restrict your access to the news. Can you pitch in to help keep it that way? We rely on our readers to keep us online, so make a one-time or monthly donation today! According to  a recent report , Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and West Virginia have the worst health in the US. These states have higher rates of premature deaths, chronic diseases and poor health behaviors year after year. Why are people in some places in the US consistently less healthy than those in others? If you look to health and fitness magazines, it may seem like poor diet, lack of exercise and other bad behaviors are to blame. Genetics and access to health care are also commonly cited reasons for why some people are healthier than others. But where a person lives, works and plays also matters. As a public health researcher interested in how society affects our health, my research shows where you live plays a powerful role on your health. Economic ...
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Why Rural America Isn't a Lost Cause for Progressive Ideas 31.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Rural politicians across the country are buying into a new way of campaigning, with platforms that might sound more aligned with those of college students living in Berkeley, California, than former miners from the central Appalachian coalfields. They're talking about raising the minimum wage, universal health care, debt-free college and investing in local assets, instead of industrial recruitment. If you're a fan of real journalism, now's the time to strengthen Truthout's mission. Help us keep publishing stories that expose government and corporate wrongdoing: Make a donation right now! For the past seven years, Jess King has directed a business development nonprofit in her hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She watched the community's poverty rate climb to 30 percent over that time, well above that of the state's two largest cities, Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. She also saw how state and federal policy influenced the very real decisions of real people in her community, often in increasingly negative ...
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Worker Cooperatives Offer Real Alternatives to Trump's Retrograde Economic Vision 28.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Worker-owners of Maharlika Cleaning Cooperative, which provides high quality, eco-friendly office cleaning services. (Photo: Maharlika) Where do you turn for news and analysis you can rely on? If the answer is Truthout, then please support our mission by making a tax-deductible donation! Announcing his presidency in 2016, Donald Trump promised the nation that he'd become "the greatest job president God ever created." His plan to accomplish this rested on a retrograde economic vision that would "make America great again," by restoring waning coal and manufacturing jobs, as well as putting an end to the alleged assault on American work by foreign immigrants and global competition. A year later, his attempts to realize this vision have largely consisted of backwards motion. In October, he rolled back the Clean Power Plan, arguing that carbon emissions regulations, rather than the widespread shift away from fossil fuels, were responsible for the decline of US coal. While the striking of these environmental ...
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Can rural towns stem the trend of population decline? 11.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Small-town Choteau, Montana, is working to find answers to the question that is plaguing 23 of the state’s counties.
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"Working People Are the Real Experts on Their Lives": How a Grassroots Group in North Carolina Is Fighting Trump's Betrayal 3.1.2018 Truthout.com
North Carolina's working poor thought they were being listened to -- now they feel betrayed and duped, say Down Home North Carolina organizers. The organization that grew out of the ashes of the 2016 election, is helping people in rural North Carolina tap into their own talent as organizers. (Photo: Cyndi Hoelzle / EyeEm / Getty Images) Our journalists work tirelessly to deliver the news to you every day! Will you sign up for a monthly donation and become one of the many readers who sustain Truthout's work? Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now nearly a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 104th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this ...
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Ten Photos: I Saw What Resilience Looks Like 3.1.2018 Truthout.com
Greg Grey Cloud, Lakota, dresses Red Clouds of the Sunka Waken Oyate ("horse nation") at the Tiwahe Glu Kini Pi ("bringing the family back to life") equine therapy ranch near the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo: Mary Annette Pember) By the numbers, Native Americans reliably top lists of  violence ,  poverty ,  unemployment , and  addiction  in the United States. Taken alone, the data paint a dismal picture of intractable, inescapable poverty. But on reservations and in communities, the picture was a whole lot more complex in 2017. As I have for several years, I spent most of 2017 traveling through Indian Country for the stories I was covering. An old-school journalist, I travel simply and close to the ground; I keep a loose schedule so that stories have a chance to emerge. I spend many hours just chatting with folks. In 2017, I was gifted with a glimpse of the people behind the damning data. Their lives were far grander and more complex than I imagined. This year, I had a front row seat to ...
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A National Beautification Campaign Revitalized Communities in the '60s and Could Again Today 1.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In the 1960s, Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson's campaign to protect the natural beauty of the United States united Americans during divisive times. The drums of war drowned out Johnson's efforts, but activists believe beauty can unite us again today. Lady Bird Johnson and Stewart Udall in a raft on the Snake River. (Photo: LBJ Library ) Here at Truthout, our commitment to uncovering injustice, disseminating transformative ideas and inspiring action is as steadfast as ever. Will you join us in this mission? "If anything can save the world, I'd put my money on beauty," once declared Doug Tompkins, conservationist and founder of the global clothing giants, The North Face and Esprit. The beauty he meant was not the garments he sold, but the natural beauty of the Earth, and the beauty of well-designed human environments.  In this polarized time, can a campaign for beauty help bring Americans together? I think so. Beauty was once very much a part of the American dialogue and tradition. It animated the paintings ...
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How Hospitals Are Failing Black Mothers 28.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: AndreyPopov / iStock / Getty Images Plus) When Dacheca Fleurimond decided to give birth at SUNY Downstate Medical Center earlier this year, her sister tried to talk her out of it. Her sister had recently delivered at a better-rated hospital in Brooklyn's gentrified Park Slope neighborhood and urged Fleurimond, a 33-year-old home health aide, to do the same. But Fleurimond had given birth to all five of her other children at the state-run SUNY Downstate and never had a bad experience. She and her family had lived steps away from the hospital in East Flatbush when they emigrated from Haiti years ago. She knew the nurses at SUNY Downstate, she told her sister. She felt comfortable there. She didn't know then how much rode on her decision, or how fraught with risk her delivery would turn out to be. It's been long-established that black women like Fleurimond fare worse in pregnancy and childbirth, dying at a rate  more than triple  that of white mothers. And while part of the disparity can be ...
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Trump Vowed to Fix US Infrastructure -- but His Budget Stiffs Small Towns 26.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The block grant program and other federal programs that have assisted communities with about $8 billion annually for cleaner water, safer sidewalks, streetlights and sewage treatment are on the chopping block in Washington, DC. Despite President Trump's promise to rebuild the US's ailing infrastructure, much-needed financial support for small communities is threatened by details deeply embedded in the Trump administration's 2018 budget and tax plans. This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a nonprofit news organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Learn more at  revealnews.org  and subscribe to the Reveal podcast, produced with PRX, at  revealnews.org/podcast . Orange Cove, California, whose nearly 10,000 residents include many Central Valley farmworkers, needed to quit sending dirty water into a nearby creek. Thorp, Wisconsin, a village of about 1,600, needed to install an elevator to make the public library more accessible to disabled ...
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"The People Did Not Vote for Tax Breaks for the Rich": Activists Vow to Stop GOP Tax Bill and Hold Congress Accountable 19.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
We will not allow the GOP tax bill to go through without our voices registering, say activists Sarah Chaisson-Warner and Jessica Juarez Scruggs of People's Action. And if the millions who have been calling, emailing, getting arrested and standing in the freezing cold are ignored, People's Action will work tirelessly to claw back and undo the damage in 2018, they say. Maine People's Alliance organized a last-minute protest in Kittery, Maine, to demand Sen. Susan Collins vote "no" on the tax bill up for vote this week. (Photo courtesy of People's Action) Stories like this are more important than ever! To make sure Truthout can keep publishing them, please give a tax-deductible donation today. Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now nearly a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, ...
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Do migrant workers have access to health care? 8.12.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Heryka Miranda Do migrant workers have healthcare? The answer to that question is not easy. As a condition of employment, migrant workers have the right to public healthcare , however, whether they have access is a more complicated question. Many workers do not know that they have healthcare, and generally only access emergency services. Most only have the right to the basic benefits available as a part of the provincial health system, not to dental, prescription drug and other such coverage. Migrant workers often work long hours for 6 or 7 days a week. When you add language barriers, lack of transportation, and fear of the employer finding out about their illnesses, many workers report major impediments to accessing healthcare . There are also important concerns about occupational health and safety, and currently there are campaigns to demand  better pesticide rules and improve occupational health and safety across North America.    I introduce to the reader two groups in the Niagara Region who are ...
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In rural Colorado, can art provide an economic engine? 30.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A small town invests in affordable housing for the creative sector.
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Donald Trump's Fake Populism or Putting Your Mouth Where Your Money Isn't 28.11.2017 Truthout.com
President Donald Trump gestures during a rally at the Phoenix Convention Center on August 22, 2017, in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo: Ralph Freso / Getty Images) You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. Among the stranger features of the 2016 election campaign was the success of Donald Trump, a creature of globalization, as an America First savior of the white working class. A candidate who amassed billions of dollars by playing globalization for all it was  worth  -- he manufactured clothes and accessories bearing his name in low-wage economies and invested in corporations eager to outsource -- won over millions of voters by promising to keep jobs here in the US. Admittedly, only  a third  of his voters earned less than $50,000 a year and  cultural and racial resentment , not just economic grievances, drove many of them to Trump.  Still, in an ever more economically unequal America, his populist economic message resonated. It helped ...
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Paiute Tribe elders navigate a faltering health care system 23.11.2017 High Country News Most Recent
As federal funding dwindles, remote Nevada tribes struggle for access.
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