User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Labor :: Unions
Last updated: Mar 19 2019 22:22 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Christchurch happens every day in the war of terror 19.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
World As we mourn the victims of the terrorist atrocity in New Zealand -- where at least 50 Muslim worshippers were mowed down by a white supremacist partially "inspired" by Donald Trump -- many are looking for answers to the inevitable questions of why and how. To answer those questions, and explore how we might prevent such terrorist acts, it may be helpful to recognize that what happened at Christchurch -- mass murder produced as the logical result of a long-running political epoch that is almost singularly defined by the dehumanization and demonization of Muslims, Arabs, and anyone perceived as such -- happens every day. As in any war, atrocities are the norm, not the aberration. In the war of terror that has been waged by so-called Western democracies for decades -- long before 9/11 -- governments and militaries, their compliant media partners, the so-called entertainment industry, and a host of others have played the role of initiators, accomplices, and accelerants to a fiery hatred of all things ...
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A plea for grown-up climate action 15.3.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Let’s get to work on climate so striking children can put down their signs and get back to class.
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Students in Canada prepare to strike for the climate 14.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar For decades many of us have protested, marched, and written innumerable papers (killing our fair share of trees) to say that the actions governments are taking to protect the environment are not enough. As politicians and the powerful keep watering down what is necessary to protect the environment and trying to placate opposition with weak accords, we are seeing the impacts of climate change become increasingly devasting. Young people around the world are absolutely right to ask why go to school if we may well have destroyed the planet by the time they are finished being "educated," and what good is education if no one is listening to the educated anyway. This is where the global student strikes for climate come in. Greta Thunberg started the actions in 2018 by striking in front of the Swedish parliament, eventually protesting every Friday to demand that the Swedish government reduce carbon emissions in accordance with the  Paris Agreement . The movement has grown and now, on March 15, there ...
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Students prepare to strike for the climate on March 15 14.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Students prepare to strike for the climate on March 15
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Want a Green New Deal? Organize labour! 28.2.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ted Franklin There are a number of ecosocialist responses to the Green New Deal, converging for the most part around the recognition that though it is not the Green New Deal most of us would prefer, it is the opportunity to move the paralysis of the climate change movement very far in the right -- left -- direction that our times so desperately need. This is a series of essays in six voices , from longtime activists who participate in the North American ecosocialist network System Change Not Climate Change . Each was challenged to make their point in 500 words or less. It was intended as a constructive contribution to the wonderful storm of discussion that the Green New Deal has opened up. Read the full series here . Labour's skepticism is the elephant in the room confronting organizers fighting for a Green New Deal ambitious enough to avoid catastrophic climate change. The Washington Post reports that the entire coal industry employs about the same number as the ski industry, yet some labour leaders ...
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The kids are alright 27.2.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
James Murray reflects on school strikes, theories of change and vegan sausage rolls.
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‘Why shouldn’t I try and save all you adults?’ 22.2.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A portrait of Haven Coleman, a young climate activist.
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Unions are partnering with entrepreneurs for a just energy transition 28.1.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
A new coalition with names such as Ørsted, Autodesk and Unilever is championing clean jobs — but some say that doesn't go far enough.
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How the Los Angeles Times went from union-busting to media role model 24.12.2018 Current Issue
Resistance to deep cutbacks have brought about change to the 137-year-old paper.
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Despite back-to-work legislation, picket lines outside Canada Post facilities continue 11.12.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Despite back-to-work legislation, picket lines outside Canada Post facilities continue
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Open Letter: Senators voice concern bill to end postal strike could violate charter of rights 26.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
rabbe staff In a special sitting of the House of Commons, members of Parliament early Saturday, November 24, passed Bill C-89, a back-to-work bill that would end the strike by Canada Post workers. This bill then went proceeded to the Senate. After studying the bill, the Senate adopted a motion Saturday evening to adjourn its discussions until Monday afternoon. As the Senate prepared to review the bill, two senators issued this public letter on November 23.   The Honourable Patricia A. Hajdu, MP Office of the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour Dear Minister Hajdu, As your government moves forward with back-to-work legislation to force an end to the dispute between Canada Post and the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, senators must consider their constitutional role. One of the duties senators are tasked with is to pay particular attention to legislation that might impinge upon protections found within the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Section 2(d) of the Charter states that the ...
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Postal strike in perspective: Union has made great strides possible 6.11.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Anne Ehret The current strike by Canada Post workers has made me reflect on my early years as a letter carrier in Vancouver, when the crown corporation was first hiring female letter carriers. It was 1974, and I was 21. I had moved to Vancouver from southwestern Ontario because I wanted to experience a different part of Canada. I initially had worked in a bank, but was feeling quite restless and unhappy in this job. Then, I saw the mail carrier come into the bank to deliver the mail. I was so impressed by the fact it was a woman, that I immediately went up to her and asked: “They’re hiring women for this position now?” She responded, “Oh yes. It started a few months ago.” I called in sick the next day, went to the post office and applied. A few weeks later, I was on the job. I was aware that some of the older male carriers struggled with having women working alongside them. This did not bother me because my father, who was also a mail carrier, had always maintained that women could do this (or any) job ...
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Can cooperatives save America's small farms? 11.10.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Amid a nationwide rise in worker-owned businesses of all types, small farms across the country are foregoing traditional farm ownership and reaping the benefits of cooperative farming.
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D-J Composites lockout is a refresher on reality of picket lines 28.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Labour Union work stoppages have become quite rare in Canada. In the current decade, strikes and lockouts have accounted for less than one-30th of one per cent of all working time -- down more than 90 per cent from the strike-prone 1970s. The year 2016 set a new postwar low: just 631,870 days lost, breaking the previous record set in 1960 (even though today's work force is more than three times bigger). And more of those disputes these days are lockouts -- when employers stop production until the workers concede -- rather than strikes, when unions take the lead. Given that context, perhaps it's not surprising many Canadians have forgotten (or never learned) how these things actually work. Someone who chanced upon a rare picket line might think it's just a demonstration: protesters gathering to express an opinion. They have the right to demonstrate, but probably should do it politely. However, picket lines are not demonstrations. Pickets are a form of economic warfare. It's a process, accepted and ...
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Despite constant propaganda, the number of workers who wish they had a union is growing 3.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Happy Labour Day! Overall union membership may be shrinking, but the number of workers who wish they had a union and would vote to join one if they could appears to be on the rise. This tells an interesting story about the state of affairs in North America as the last long weekend of the summer rolls around again. Alas, in Canada as in the United States, the Labour Day weekend has lately become an occasion on which conservative news media operations pack their pages with feverish attacks on the right of working people to join unions and bargain their working conditions together. Given the Orwellian zeitgeist of the past 30 years in the industrialized West, these jeremiads often use language that says the opposite of what is really meant -- so, for example, denial of the right to bargain together becomes the "right to work." Such editorializing is often accompanied by misleading "studies" by corporate-financed Astroturf groups and "think tanks" that purport to prove organized working ...
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Prison strike should prompt our thinking on the abolition of prisons 31.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson As you may have heard, there is a prison strike now underway in the United States as well as in one institution in Nova Scotia. Jailhouse Lawyers Speak, an incarcerated group of prisoner rights advocates, called for the strike action to run from August 21 to September 9, highlighting 10 modest demands that can be read here . One of those demands calls for an end to prison slavery. Journalist-author-activist Chris Hedges argues, "Prisons are a grotesque manifestation of corporate capitalism." He explains prisoners now work behind bars for major corporations including Chevron, Starbucks, Wal-Mart, Microsoft, and Hewlett-Packard, to name just a few. Hedges notes: "Prisoners do not receive benefits or pensions. They are not paid overtime. They are forbidden to organize and strike. They must show up on time. They are not paid for sick days or granted vacations. They cannot formally complain about working conditions or safety hazards. If they are disobedient, or attempt to protest their pitiful ...
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Labour affairs get scant coverage in the modern mainstream media 31.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn Back in the 1960s, 1970s, and into the '80s, almost all of the large newspapers in Canada had a reporter who specialized in labour-management relations. Wilf List covered labour for The Globe and Mail for an amazing 35 years. I wrote a labour relations column for the Toronto Star for 15 years (1968-1982), and the editorial staff of several other papers at the time also included labour columnists as well as labour reporters.  Conventions of the largest labour unions and the Canadian Labour Congress attracted dozens of reporters. The names of union presidents were almost as well known as those of prominent politicians and corporate executives. Once a year, in my Star column, I listed, in order, the 10 labour leaders I considered the country's most influential, without having to identify them with much more than their names. Today, not a single daily newspaper employs a labour columnist, much less a labour reporter. Union conventions rarely get any press. Coverage of occasional labour-related events ...
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Mining for emissions reductions? Strike while the earth is cool 30.8.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Mining can be a risky business these days.
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Workers' co-ops in Canada gaining power, voice and stability 22.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Maya Bhullar For the past year few months, I have been following the story of Glitter Bean Café in Halifax. Baristas have helped build a unionized co-operative, with SEIU Local 2 as the union. The Glitter Bean is a café, a safe space for LGBTQ youth in Halifax, and a part of the baristas working to improve their lives and those of others.   Their struggle started in 2013 when baristas working for Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op , one of Canada's first fair trade workers' co-operatives, started their fight for unionization. In 2017, Just Us! then sold its Halifax locations to another company called Smiling Goat, which was found to have not paid employees and suppliers. After Smiling Goat moved to shut down all six of its cafés, the former Smiling Goat baristas worked with allies and the union to start Glitter Bean . Their campaign is an illustrative story about working with both unions and the co-op model to stand for your values, improve your workplace, save your job and have a voice at work.      One of ...
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Alberta government and AUPE sign tentative agreement for three-year public service contract 17.8.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga The Alberta government and the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees both announced yesterday they've signed a tentative agreement on a new collective agreement covering the union's approximately 23,000 members who work directly for the provincial government. This is the group of public employees the union accurately calls "front-line government service employees," right-wing ideological enemies of public services misleadingly dismiss as "bureaucrats," and many of the rest of know by the old-fashioned-sounding but honourable term "civil servants." Whatever you call them, political opponents of Alberta's NDP government will be straining like hounds to get their teeth into the details of the contract and attack the government with fatuous claims it's too rich. That may explain why details of the pact are thin on the ground until after it's been voted on by affected AUPE members. We know it's a three-year deal. And we know it took a long time to negotiate -- almost a year and a half, ...
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