On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Labor :: Unions
Last updated: Dec 25 2018 04:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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5 ways businesses can take action to reduce environmental racism 16.11.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
5 ways businesses can take action to reduce environmental racism Samantha Harris Mon, 11/16/2020 - 00:20 For decades, Black, indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) in the United States have sought environmental justice as a civil right, but now, the grave disparities in environmental harms are coming into national prominence . This year’s COVID-19 crisis and racial justice movement have highlighted the systemic inequities in the U.S. and revealed how crises disproportionately affect certain populations. The urgency of now is underscored by the climate crisis and the need for climate justice.  Businesses continue to lead on climate in the absence of U.S. political will. And while we have a long way to go, businesses are also stepping up in the fight for racial equity  — some leading the pack, such as Starbucks , and beginning to integrate equitable strategies across their business, particularly in their climate solutions. Whether we say climate justice, climate equity, the intersection of climate change ...
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Northwest co-op builds for a local food future beyond big ag 1.11.2020 High Country News Most Recent
‘I’ve always felt like this was something to do in case the world doesn’t end.’
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Thousands forced from their homes despite California’s eviction moratorium 13.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Without clear state orders, a loophole in the law allows sheriff departments decide whether to evict.
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Coronavirus concerns revive labor organizing 18.6.2020 Current Issue
Washington fruit packers seek lasting gains from pandemic strikes.
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How a Washington ski patrol learned to unionize 10.6.2020 Current Issue
When Vail Resorts added Stevens Pass to its empire, ski patrollers feared becoming fungible parts in a corporate machine. So they organized.
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Farmworkers are deemed 'essential' but are not protected from COVID-19 23.4.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
As many people in the U.S. shelter-in-place in their homes, farmworkers are at risk of becoming severely ill from the coronavirus as they continue to support the country's food supply chain.
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Youth lead the Earth Day digital strike 22.4.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Social distancing measures are in place but these organizations are still engaging in collective action.
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Arizona steelworkers continue strike despite COVID-19 17.4.2020 High Country News Most Recent
After more than a decade without a raise, workers are asking for a better contract.
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Capitalist businesses may have the model for democratic and effective economic planning 11.3.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
In public, CEOs defend the superiority of markets over planning. But inside their own corporations, where they could leave their various business units to compete with each other, they rely instead on comprehensive strategic planning.
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Brian Mecinas on the next generation of climate leadership and activism 9.3.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Youth leaders around the world are rising up to inspire, empower and mobilize a generational movement to demand action on the climate crisis and ensure environmental justice for all. From organized strikes calling for bold climate solutions to filing (and sometimes winning) lawsuits against state and federal governments, they’re taking their future into their own hands. Arizona Youth Climate Strike's Brian Mecinas discusses how they are working to create the change they want to see in the world. From GreenBiz 20.
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Trend: Employee activism on sustainability marches on 24.2.2020 GreenBiz.com
With growing distrust of governmental institutions, employees are using their voices to advocate for change and demand that their employers do so, too.
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6 ways companies can be a ‘force for good’ in their supply chains 18.2.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It’s a collective responsibility.
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The energy sector’s carbon emissions are rising, not falling — can COP25 turn it around? 10.12.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
This year’s United Nations Climate Change Summit (COP25) opened in Madrid against a backdrop of mounting urgency. In the last 12 months, the U.N.’s climate science body, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), has issued two special reports raising stark warnings of the risks climate change poses to food security and the oceans. 
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Undocumented farmworkers could get citizenship from a new bill in Congress 4.12.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A United Farm Worker organizer reveals the political strategy behind the scenes.
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For-profit home-care company locked in stalemate with workers 28.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar CarePartners, a for-profit company which provides home care services in Ontario, has been locked in a months-long stalemate with the union that represents nearly 2,800 of its personal support workers (PSWs). Women and racialized immigrants comprise the majority of the workforce, which has been without a contract since March. On November 10, Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 1 announced that CarePartners had filed a "no board report" with the Ministry of Labour. Filing this report starts a 17-day (or more) cooling-off period before a strike or lockout deadline. After the deadline, the union can vote to strike, or the employer can lock out workers. To better understand the conflict between SEIU and CarePartners, rabble had in-depth conversations with two personal support workers and the director of home care at the union. CarePartners did not respond to our request for comments, despite multiple attempts to reach the firm through emails and phone calls. Minimizing wages for ...
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Working as a janitor: Lyle 17.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Lyle Skrapek has been working as a janitor since 2009. He first became involved with the union after his workplace was organized in 2010, and has been serving as a steward for the past five years. Here are some highlights from his conversation with rabble. The benefits of being unionized  [When I first began work in 2009] we weren't unionized, and then SEIU came in. We had a very basic collective bargaining agreement [back then]. We had only one personal day [compared to four now]. And we didn't have benefits at the time and there weren't really any wage increases.  From 2015 we started to make serious headway into getting more wages and benefits for us. So we've grown a lot in a relatively short period of time. Cleaners now have a voice to protect their rights, safety, job security and economic status. Specifically, we will now be introducing a pension plan in 2022.  Invisibility of the job  I hate to say it but people in a way take us for granted because they don't always see us. We're ...
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The daily grind of working as a janitor 8.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Natalie Guitead, 26, has been working as a janitor for three years now, and the job is beginning to take a toll. The physical stress from repetitive motions builds up over time, especially when she is lifting 22 kilograms worth of garbage. "I'm always just bending down, picking up garbage and then dumping into my bin," she says.  "And I notice at the end of the week, that I feel it in my back, or my arm is sore. And if it's a really bad day where there's a lot of heavy garbage. I just feel very exhausted." Her current workplace at a commercial building in downtown Ottawa is better than some of the other locations she has worked in.  "For our building, we have three people who work on one floor," she says. "So one [person] will take care of garbage and dusting. One will take care of washrooms, and then one employee will vacuum and mop floors. Whereas I've worked in other locations where I've done [all tasks] for one entire floor." Addressing disparity in working conditions The disparity in ...
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CUPE education workers ratify deal with the province 7.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Seventy-nine per cent of CUPE education workers have voted in favour of the agreement the union's bargaining committee reached with the Ontario government last month.  The union announced the results of the ratification vote at a press conference at Queen's Park on Monday morning.   The agreement retains $58 million in funding that the Ontario government had originally threatened to cut, while securing an additional $20 million. According to the Canadian Union of Public Employee (CUPE), 1,300 jobs have been saved as a result of this funding.  CUPE represents approximately 55,000 support staff in the province including special needs assistants, early childhood educators and custodians. Other terms of the agreement include an annual one per cent wage increase for workers, plus the maintenance of the current sick leave package, which had come under fire from the school boards. The union attributed the reversal of the funding cuts to the solidarity between education workers, parents and ...
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When disaster strikes, Indigenous communities receive unequal recovery aid 6.11.2019 High Country News Most Recent
U.S. citizens recovering from natural disasters receive $26 per person, per year from the federal government. Tribal citizens? Just $3.
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These Canadian janitors live to work 31.10.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Martin Echevarrieta finishes his eight-and-a-half-hour janitorial shift around 4 p.m. at a residential building in Toronto's North York area. The 39-year-old is in charge of cleaning 22 floors, and takes pride in standing up to the rigours of the job. When initially recommended for the position two years ago, he was told that the employer wanted someone responsible who could handle the workload. "I said, 'Why not?' Plus they give me good benefits plus a little more money [than my previous job]. But it's what I like. I like to work," he says, in his customary soft-spoken manner. The management trusts him now, he says, crediting his strong work ethic. One day, he hopes to be promoted to superintendent. After about a minute's drive, Echevarrieta unites daily with his old friend, Enrique Turnainsky, 63. The older of the two Hispanic men also finishes his cleaning shift around the same time.  But they're not headed home, or meeting for an after-work drink at a bar or café.  From 5:30 until ...
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