User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Labor :: Unions
Last updated: Aug 22 2019 23:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Precarious work looms large in bargaining impasse for University of Victoria lecturers 22.8.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Sarah (not her real name) has been teaching at the University of Victoria for over 15 years. Unlike many of her colleagues, she is lucky enough to be teaching full-time with benefits.  However, as a sessional lecturer, her job is not secure. Like some of her colleagues, she fears she could be demoted to part time.  According to the union, as some full-time instructors have lost courses and faced demotion, they have been forced into other part-time jobs and increasing precarity. Bargaining for job security Job security is the main goal for the 450 sessional lecturers and music instructors currently in negotiations with the university, according to CUPE 4163 president Greg Melnechuk. On Friday, August 9, the two sides reached an impasse within two days of another round of bargaining talks. The talks have been ongoing for five months, under the looming threat of job action.  The membership has already voted overwhelmingly in favour of a strike, if the need arises. Only 70 out of the 450 ...
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Union fights against profits over patients in long-term care 1.8.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Service Employees International Union members in Ontario have been protesting wages and working conditions outside the offices of long-term care corporations. SEIU represents 25,000 workers in the long-term care sector in Ontario, including nurses, personal support workers and dietary aides.  Corey Johnson, a union spokesperson, says the actions have been organized in conjunction with its bargaining with around 100 nursing homes , mostly in the for-profit sector.  Johnson says the main issue is short-staffing, as there aren't enough people to care for the residents. "It's taking a toll on both -- the residents who aren't getting the care they deserve," he says. "And on the workers who are doing far more than they should be doing. They're burning out."  In March this year, a CUPE-commissioned report called " Breaking Point " delved into the extensive violence long-term care workers in the sector face due to inadequate staffing. A related survey, also commissioned by CUPE, revealed that over ...
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Janitors locked out of jobs at downtown Toronto condos 13.7.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Should a janitor be expected to purchase their own garbage bags if they need more than are provided by their employer? Is it reasonable to ask cleaning staff to use four rags to clean an entire building including washrooms? These are some of the questions being asked by a union representing janitors in Toronto. Service Employees International Union Local 2 says that working conditions have been deteriorating for the cleaning staff at The Icon condominiums in downtown Toronto since the property management company hired a new contractor last summer.  The six janitors, all of whom are immigrants and people of colour, have been locked out of their jobs following a breakdown in negotiations with Luciano Janitorial Services.  Their last contract, which had been negotiated with the previous cleaning company, expired on March 31. The union has been picketing outside the condo this week and held a rally on Friday, June 11 . Heavy concessions Jorge Villa, an organizer with SEIU Local 2, says that ...
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Canada Post spent $21 million to fight equity; federal government cuts incentives for workers handling Phoenix issue; and 3,000 B.C. workers go on strike 10.7.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Canada Post spent $21 million to fight pay equity The Toronto Star reports that Canada Post spent $21 million in legal fees as it resisted attempts to institute pay equity. The company released figures from 1989 to 2013, as the matter went all the way to the Supreme Court. However, Canada Post said it didn't have records going back to 1983 when the complaint was initially filed by the workers. No more incentives for workers dealing with Phoenix payment fiasco  The federal government has not renewed an incentive package for workers who have been addressing the Phoenix payment fiasco. The package for compensation advisors had been instituted in August 2017 and expired last month as they worked towards reducing a massive backlog in payments to federal employees. The Public Service Alliance of Canada criticized the government for letting the agreement lapse, warning that the move will once again increase the backlog. Over 400,000 jobs created in the last 12 months The new labour force survey ...
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Trump laying path to new nuclear arms race 4.7.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
World "Axis of Evil" first appeared in former President George W. Bush's State of the Union address in January 2002, describing Iraq, Iran and North Korea months after the September 11 attacks. Fourteen months after the speech, the United States invaded Iraq. The U.S. remains at war there 16 years later. Now, U.S. President Donald Trump is threatening Iran with "obliteration" while he visits and showers praise on North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un. Why the different treatment of these two remaining countries in the "Axis of Evil"? It's simple: North Korea has an estimated 20 to 60 nuclear warheads and the missiles to deliver them, and Iran lacks nuclear weapons. The lesson is painfully clear: to avoid a devastating war with the United States, develop nuclear weapons as a deterrent. Despite what many Trump critics are saying, including many of the Democratic presidential contenders, Trump's brief meeting last week with the North Korean dictator was a good thing. Diplomacy is better than war. A war with ...
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When climate strikers hit home 27.6.2019 GreenBiz.com
When your kids take to the streets to protest the lack of action on climate change, it can be a teachable moment for all.
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Economic benefits of education spending; Quebec forces immigration reform bill; and union threatens to sue Alberta Conservatives 26.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Job vacancies on the rise across country: Stats Canada According to a new Statistics Canada report , job vacancies rose by 10 per cent in the first quarter of 2019 nationwide compared to the same period last year. Vacancies grew the highest in Quebec, followed by British Columbia and Ontario. Health care and social assistance had the highest growth in vacancies at 19 per cent compared to the first quarter in 2018.   Government-union deals on domestic violence leave start of new trend The Canadian Press reports that recent deals reached between the federal government and PIPSC last month are indicative of a new trend regarding domestic violence leave. The civil-service union bargained a deal that allows up to 10 days off for domestic violence victims, which provides greater relief than existing laws across the country.  Better employment prospects for university grads A new Indeed Canada report says that while fresh grads struggle to enter the job market, they have better employment ...
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Federal unions speak out against P3; new pilot for care workers offers respite; and Manitoba nurses protest health-care changes 20.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar PSAC decries $2.6 billion public-private partnership for heating and cooling federal buildings Environment Minister Catherine McKenna has been enthusiastic about a contract with a private consortium to upgrade heating and cooling infrastructure in federal buildings. But PSAC and other public sector unions say that such partnerships do not provide value for taxpayer funds, the Hill Times reports . Trudeau government announces new pilots for care workers New pilot programs for domestic care workers will grant open work permits to them and their immediate family members, the Toronto Star reports . Care workers have long demanded open work permits that would allow them to escape abuse by exploitative employers. New security rules making it tougher to find seasonal farm workers The CBC reports that businesses accustomed to using temporary foreign farm workers are finding it tough due to new government rules requiring biometric data. The articles quotes an employer saying that Canadian residents ...
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The strategy behind the UCP's Public Sector Arbitration Deferral Act explained 14.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! Albertans who don't pay much attention to labour relations may be forgiven for wondering about the harsh reaction yesterday to the Alberta government's introduction of legislation to delay arbitration for thousands of public employees. Many readers not directly hostile to unions nevertheless may have wondered, "What's the big deal? The government's just asking for a little time." Let me explain. Once Bill 9, the Public Sector Arbitration Deferral Act, introduced in the legislature yesterday by Finance Minister Travis Toews, is passed -- a certainty in a United-Conservative-Party-majority legislature -- it will postpone the start of any arbitration hearings until after Halloween, and suspend hearings that are already underway until the same scary day. The legislation will impact 24 collective agreements covering roughly 180,000 public sector employees, some of them ...
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UCP bulls ahead with plan to ignore public employees' collective agreements 13.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! One thing you can say for Jason Kenney's United Conservative Party government: they don't even pretend to act in good faith! Early this month they mailed public sector unions a letter asking them to take part in "a consultation session" about the government's wish to delay contractually stipulated wage arbitration included in a number of public sector collective agreements, including those for thousands of nurses, medical professionals, hospital support staff and other health-care workers. Now, without even bothering to do any "consulting," they're introducing something to the legislature today called the Public Sector Wage Arbitration Deferral Act. This isn't a surprise. Finance Minister Travis Toews has been saying repeatedly he's prepared to use legislation to override legal contracts between unions and provincial agencies to delay contractually mandated bargaining ...
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Celebrating the historical triumphs of Canada's outsiders and oppressed 13.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Please chip in to support rabble's election 2019 coverage.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! The year 2019 marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, and the 50th anniversary of Woodstock and the moon landing. Doubtless there are others. But in Manitoba, 2019 is the 100th anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike and the 50th anniversary of Ed Schreyer's election as premier of the first NDP government in Manitoba history. The two anniversaries are connected, of course. It may have taken 50 years, but the outsiders and the oppressed who showed their solidarity in 1919 eventually triumphed at the ballot box over the Manitoba elite who thought they had a divine right to run the province and to run it in their own interest. If, as the title of a book about the strike claims , the state trembled in 1919, Manitoba's deep state trembled in 1969 -- and it still regards the NDP, out of power and in power, as folks who are just not supposed to be in charge, despite the fact that the NDP has been ...
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Ford government erodes workers' safety; labour unites against racism; immigrant employment reaches new Canadian high 13.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation and join us as we take on the 2019 election.  Support  rabble.ca  today for as little as $1 per month! #UniteAgainstRacism on Labour Day The 2019 Labour Day will be premised on anti-racism as 13 Canadian labour council presidents signed onto an open letter at the urging of Migrants Rights Network (MRN). The alliance of migrant rights groups across the country has called for a national day of action on June 16, as the campaign fights back against increasing xenophobia and racism. "Right now, what's happening in Canada is we're seeing a slate of right-wing governments being elected across the country," says Preethy Sivakumar of MRN. "And what are all these right wing governments doing? They're using racism as a weapon to win votes. Once they gain power, what they're doing is pushing austerity budgets , deepening poverty , and attacking workers' rights . Unions have an active interest in ensuring that ...
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Corporation charged in worker's death; lockout ends at Vancouver port; and 12,000 Ontario plumbers vote to strike 3.6.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Corporate giant charged with worker's death in new precedent for Canadian justice Last month, rabble.ca reported about the Canadian state's cozy relationship with negligent employers , whereby the safety concerns of workers take a backseat to profit. However, in an unprecedented move, a multinational corporation has been charged with criminal negligence for the 2009 death of Sam Fitzpatrick at a construction site in British Columbia. Lockout ends at Vancouver port A brief lockout at the Vancouver port ended after a long night of negotiations, according to Global News . The 6,500 members of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Canada (ILWU) were locked out by their employer, the B.C. Maritime Employers Association (BCMEA) as bargaining failed after 17 months of negotiations. The two parties have reached a tentative deal, which will have to be ratified by the membership. Winnipeg transit workers move closer to strike On the centennial anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike , 1,400 ...
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The movement is growing to shut down CANSEC 31.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson CANSEC is the largest arms trade fair in Canada. It's where multi-billion-dollar transnational corporations come to promote their products, as CANSEC boasts, to "600 VIPs, Generals, top Military and Government officials" and "40+ delegations from around the world." Some of the world's most profitable weapons merchants attend CANSEC, including Lockheed Martin, whose subsidiary builds the Cyclone twin-engine helicopter for anti-submarine warfare, and Boeing, the maker of the F-18 Super Hornet jet fighter. In 2015, Lockheed Martin sold $36 billion of arms, turning a profit of $3.6 billion. That same year Boeing sold $28 billion in arms making a profit of $5.2 billion. On May 29, beginning at 7 a.m. in the morning, close to 100 activists blocked the two entrances at the EY Centre, where CANSEC takes place, not far from Ottawa's international airport, with the clear message that "Arms dealers are not welcome!" They succeeded in being highly visible to many of the 11,500 registrants who had to ...
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United Conservative Party introduces the Open for Fast Food Act -- sorry about the 13% pay cut, kids 28.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Premier Jason Kenney's newly elected United Conservative Party introduced its second bill yesterday, calling it the Open for Business Act . The NDP immediately dubbed Bill 2 the "Pick Your Pockets Bill," seeing as its provisions include a 13-per-cent pay cut to $13 an hour from $15 for students under 18 and a way for employers to force their employees to accept time off at straight time for overtime worked. The bill also makes it harder for working people to get holiday pay. Actually, though, a better name for Bill 2 might be the "Open for Fast Food Act." After all, there wasn't actually much meat in this unappetizing little burger, and most of the condiments appear to have been designed to please fast-food corporations. The fast-food industry was so delighted it sent Vancouver-based Mark von Schellwitz, Restaurant Canada's chief Western Canadian lobbyist, to chair the news conference put on by Kenney and Labour Minister Jason Copping in an Edmonton barroom. Richard Truscott of the ...
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First Black women elected CUPW president; women's hockey players start union; and hospital workers protest cuts 28.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar First Black woman elected as CUPW president Jan Simpson became the first Black woman to be president of a national union in Canada, when she was voted into office at the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) convention in Toronto in May. According to CUPW's press release , a record number of women were elected to the union's national executive board this year. Women's hockey players start union More than 200 of the world's top women hockey players have now formed a union , under the umbrella of the Professional Women's Hockey Players Association. The association, which represents players from Canada, the U.S. and Europe, was formed in the aftermath of the Canadian Women's Hockey League shutting down . Whistleblower report reveals devastating impacts on Ontario's injured workers A new report based on freedom of information requests digs into the Ontario compensation board's practice of " deeming " -- whereby injured workers' benefits are reduced based on the board's arbitrary ...
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Exploring employee activism: Why this stakeholder group can no longer be ignored 27.5.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Don’t underestimate the power of your workforce as a vocal advocate for transparency and change, with a huge impact on strategy and reputation.
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How women sparked the Winnipeg General Strike 24.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
How women sparked the Winnipeg General Strike
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Public Service Alliance blames Liberals for bargaining impasse 10.5.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Canada's largest public sector union has declared a bargaining impasse, as it accuses the Liberal government of failing to address the needs of 90,000 federal employees. The Public Service Alliance Canada (PSAC) has been engaged with the Treasury Board for almost a year to reach a new collective bargaining agreement. PSAC: Liberals reneging on past agreements The Liberals' offer of a 1.5 per cent annual increase does not even account for the cost of inflation, said PSAC president Chris Aylward. The union noted that the offer is lower than the pay raise given to members of Parliament this month. PSAC says that contrary to the Trudeau Liberals' progressive rhetoric on feminism, it is failing to live up to a child-care memorandum of understanding signed between the two parties. PSAC wants its workers to have the right to breastfeeding breaks and wants accessible child care for all its employees across Canada, but it says the government has been resisting those demands. The union is also ...
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America forgot the Chinese workers who built the railroad 10.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Historian Gordon Chang’s new book attempts to correct that erasure.
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