User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Labor :: Unions
Last updated: Nov 19 2019 01:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Working as a janitor: Lyle 17.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Lyle Skrapek has been working as a janitor since 2009. He first became involved with the union after his workplace was organized in 2010, and has been serving as a steward for the past five years. Here are some highlights from his conversation with rabble. The benefits of being unionized  [When I first began work in 2009] we weren't unionized, and then SEIU came in. We had a very basic collective bargaining agreement [back then]. We had only one personal day [compared to four now]. And we didn't have benefits at the time and there weren't really any wage increases.  From 2015 we started to make serious headway into getting more wages and benefits for us. So we've grown a lot in a relatively short period of time. Cleaners now have a voice to protect their rights, safety, job security and economic status. Specifically, we will now be introducing a pension plan in 2022.  Invisibility of the job  I hate to say it but people in a way take us for granted because they don't always see us. We're ...
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The daily grind of working as a janitor 8.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Natalie Guitead, 26, has been working as a janitor for three years now, and the job is beginning to take a toll. The physical stress from repetitive motions builds up over time, especially when she is lifting 22 kilograms worth of garbage. "I'm always just bending down, picking up garbage and then dumping into my bin," she says.  "And I notice at the end of the week, that I feel it in my back, or my arm is sore. And if it's a really bad day where there's a lot of heavy garbage. I just feel very exhausted." Her current workplace at a commercial building in downtown Ottawa is better than some of the other locations she has worked in.  "For our building, we have three people who work on one floor," she says. "So one [person] will take care of garbage and dusting. One will take care of washrooms, and then one employee will vacuum and mop floors. Whereas I've worked in other locations where I've done [all tasks] for one entire floor." Addressing disparity in working conditions The disparity in ...
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CUPE education workers ratify deal with the province 7.11.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Seventy-nine per cent of CUPE education workers have voted in favour of the agreement the union's bargaining committee reached with the Ontario government last month.  The union announced the results of the ratification vote at a press conference at Queen's Park on Monday morning.   The agreement retains $58 million in funding that the Ontario government had originally threatened to cut, while securing an additional $20 million. According to the Canadian Union of Public Employee (CUPE), 1,300 jobs have been saved as a result of this funding.  CUPE represents approximately 55,000 support staff in the province including special needs assistants, early childhood educators and custodians. Other terms of the agreement include an annual one per cent wage increase for workers, plus the maintenance of the current sick leave package, which had come under fire from the school boards. The union attributed the reversal of the funding cuts to the solidarity between education workers, parents and ...
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When disaster strikes, Indigenous communities receive unequal recovery aid 6.11.2019 High Country News Most Recent
U.S. citizens recovering from natural disasters receive $26 per person, per year from the federal government. Tribal citizens? Just $3.
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These Canadian janitors live to work 31.10.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Martin Echevarrieta finishes his eight-and-a-half-hour janitorial shift around 4 p.m. at a residential building in Toronto's North York area. The 39-year-old is in charge of cleaning 22 floors, and takes pride in standing up to the rigours of the job. When initially recommended for the position two years ago, he was told that the employer wanted someone responsible who could handle the workload. "I said, 'Why not?' Plus they give me good benefits plus a little more money [than my previous job]. But it's what I like. I like to work," he says, in his customary soft-spoken manner. The management trusts him now, he says, crediting his strong work ethic. One day, he hopes to be promoted to superintendent. After about a minute's drive, Echevarrieta unites daily with his old friend, Enrique Turnainsky, 63. The older of the two Hispanic men also finishes his cleaning shift around the same time.  But they're not headed home, or meeting for an after-work drink at a bar or café.  From 5:30 until ...
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Indigenous voices raised at Edmonton climate strike 20.10.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Paula E. Kirman Edmonton's climate strike on Friday, October 18, was the largest protest in the city in recent history. Over 10,000 people took to the streets, marching through downtown demanding action on climate change.  The day started with a march. March organizers asked Indigenous community members to lead the march to acknowledge the work they have done to advocate for air, land and water, and for their rights to take back their stolen land for decades. People of colour were also called to the front of the march -- in fact, anyone who wasn't Indigenous or a person of colour was asked to move to the back. Even Greta Thunberg herself was not front and centre. The 16-year-old Swedish climate activist was almost inconspicuous as she marched near the back of the line along with other young participants.  Just a few weeks before, on September 27, approximately 4,000 people took part in a climate strike which was also an incredible number of people for a protest in Edmonton. Thunberg's presence drew many ...
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Organizing lessons from Tim Hortons workers: 'Don't be afraid' 8.10.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar About 45 Tim Hortons workers in Fort Frances, Ontario, banded together to form a union this past year, joining the United Food and Commercial Workers -- Canada's largest private sector union. The outlet is the only Tim Hortons in the small northern Ontario town of about 8,000 people.  "Job security was the number one factor why they decided to join UFCW," said Nathalie Vengal, an organizer with the union. Workers bargained annual wage increases, three days paid bereavement leave as well as seniority rights for scheduling and vacation time. Moreover, both full-time and part-time staff will be entitled to benefits. Vengal said that prior to unionization, access to benefits was restricted without a clear explanation of eligibility. The collective agreement language removed that ambiguity. Cross-generational allyship Many of the workers at the outlet are close to retirement age and sought job security and benefits.  Vengal said that the older employees found allyship among the younger cohort ...
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Waste work shift: Inside the structural changes in the global waste sector 5.10.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Informal waste workers have long managed the waste of the South, for whom new forms of collectives offer new hope, while the gig economy threatens to de-formalize waste management in the North.
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Message of the youth climate strike threatens comfortable illusions of baby boomers 27.9.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Karl Nerenberg While young people in Canada are taking part in the global climate strike, some of my baby boomer generation are, however timidly, expressing solidarity and support. But a good many others are at best bemused and indifferent; at worst, openly hostile to the anguish and anger of the young. I know fellow baby boomers who take comfort in the fact that, in the aggregate, Canada, only contributes two per cent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. We are only 38 million, they say. We might be wealthy enough to be included in the G7, but we are only a medium-size country. What we contribute to global warming has got to be tiny, compared to much larger countries, such as the U.S., China, India, Russia and Germany. Those are, indeed, comforting thoughts for those among us who want to get back into their SUVs and book this coming winter's flights to a sunny destination.  But before we wallow too happily in our complacency, consider this: Although by population we rank 39th, when it comes to total ...
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Business leaders call out the climate action resisters among them 26.9.2019 GreenBiz.com
As public pressure mounts, and utilities and automakers shift toward a low-carbon economy, fossil fuel companies find it harder to hide.
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Court's decision to turn off Alberta's turn-off-the-taps law should surprise no one 25.9.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Alberta's so-called turn-off-the-taps law was pretty obviously unconstitutional when Rachel Notley's New Democratic Party passed it, and it continued to be unconstitutional when Jason Kenney's United Conservative Party had it proclaimed into law. So yesterday's ruling from the Federal Court of Canada granting British Columbia a temporary injunction blocking application of the risibly named Preserving Canada's Economic Prosperity Act while the courts make its unconstitutionality official should surprise no one. The decision will come as a bitter disappointment to the UCP's credulous base, but even Kenney and Energy Minister Sonya Savage dropped their usual bluster and didn't sound all that shocked or appalled by what their lawyers must have told them Justice Sebastien Grammond was likely to say. Leastways, they obviously had their talking points in place. David Eby, B.C.'s attorney general, called the injunction a "big win" because it means the province no longer has Alberta's ...
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How to take 'systems change' from idea to action 24.9.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
We all talk about it, but we need to first understand what we mean by systems change if we’re to implement it effectively.
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GM workers sent home; hotel workers walk out; and SaskTel workers give strike notice 24.9.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Zaid Noorsumar Nemak workers represented by Unifor go back to work About 300 workers at the Nemak plant in Windsor returned to work after both sides agreed to opening negotiations,  according to the CBC . The workers went on a  wildcat strike  in response to the automotive manufacturer announcing its decision to close the plant in 2020, two years before the expiration of its collective agreement with Unifor.  Convert GM Oshawa into a publicly owned facility for electric vehicles: workers As General Motors plans to virtually exit Oshawa in favour of outsourcing production overseas, employees at the plant are advocating a bold proposal : a government-takeover of the plant to produce electric vehicles and save over 13,000 jobs.  Jennifer Wells, writing in the Toronto Star , analyzes the proposal while making a strong case for the federal government to take leadership. But does any political leader have the courage to favour nationalization?  GM Oshawa workers sent home due to U.S. strike As 48,000 General ...
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The global climate strike is just the beginning 24.9.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
The global climate strike is just the beginning
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3 ways to support employee climate activism 22.9.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Children around the world are leading climate activism — here's how adults can provide support and solidarity.
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Author Naomi Klein on the opportunity of multiple lifetimes: fighting the climate emergency 21.9.2019 GreenBiz.com
In her new book, the writer and activist urges us to take this chance to create a clean economy and save both humanity and its only home.
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How employee activists inspired Amazon's Climate Pledge 20.9.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Both Amazon employees and outsiders say it's a welcome signal, but plan to continue to push the company on its climate goals.
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Episode 189: The 2019 VERGE Vanguard speaks, a peek into Climate Week 20.9.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Featuring outtakes from our interviews with plastics game-changer Priyanka Bakaya (Renewlogy), carbon solutions geek Lisa Dyan (Kiverdi and Air Protein) and tree planter for profit Jurriaan Ruys (Land Life Company). Plus, we catch up with Climate Group CEO Helen Clarkson.
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Hey big tech, history is watching you 20.9.2019 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
While Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon and Google are progressive on some fronts, their overall corporate strategies to avert climate change have sketchy.
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Support the global climate strikes, we owe it to youth 19.9.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Support the global climate strikes, we owe it to youth
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