User: flenvcenter Topic: Economics and Jobs-Independent
Category: Sustainable Business :: Socially-Responsible Investing
Last updated: Sep 23 2020 15:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A corporate water strategy manifesto: We can and will do better 23.9.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
A corporate water strategy manifesto: We can and will do better Will Sarni Wed, 09/23/2020 - 01:30 We have decided to craft this brief manifesto to challenge the status quo, accelerate innovation, solve wicked water problems and achieve United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6, "Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all." The pandemic has strengthened our resolve to do better. Our observations and point of view for 2020 so far are: The pandemic has been an accelerator of trends, such as the digital transformation of the water sector, attention on lack of access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene, and the appalling underinvestment in water infrastructure in the U.S. and globally. The recent interest and commitment to water pledges has diverted scarce resources and funds from actions such as watershed conservation and protection, reuse, technology innovation and adoption, public policy innovation, etc. The corporate sector has too narrow of a view ...
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ESG investments: Exponential potential or surfing one wave? 21.9.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
ESG investments: Exponential potential or surfing one wave? Terry F. Yosie Mon, 09/21/2020 - 00:30 Amidst four concurrent crises — health, economic, race relations and climate — one stand-out 2020 development has been the rebound of major stock markets and, particularly, the growing performance and prominence of environment, social and governance (ESG) traded funds. ESG portfolios not only have outperformed traditional financial assets this year, but also a data analysis prepared by Morningstar, a financial advisory research firm, concluded that almost 60 percent of sustainable investments delivered higher returns than comparable funds over the past decade. Morningstar also found that ESG funds have greater longevity than non-ESG portfolios. About 77 percent of ESG funds that existed 10 years ago are presently available, whereas only 46 percent of traditional investment vehicles maintain that survivorship. These developments raise two overriding questions: what factors have converged to catapult ESG ...
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Hard truths from a decade of investing in regional food systems 10.9.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Hard truths from a decade of investing in regional food systems Meredith Storton Thu, 09/10/2020 - 02:00 The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the inequities and fragility of our industrialized food system and accelerated the movement to create strong regional food systems that support local growers, provide food security, give communities agency over their food supply and yield environmental benefits. These systems will remain out of reach, though, unless we address persistent, decades-old structural issues. Price pressures continue to challenge the viability of decentralized food systems and communities of color continue to be underserved — as farmers, food chain workers, supply chain entrepreneurs and consumers. We need to change both who we fund and how we fund if we want to create equitable, thriving regional food systems. What will it take to achieve such massive shifts? RSF Social Finance has been reflecting on that question as we wind down our Food System Transformation Fund, a pooled loan fund ...
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What does 'climate risk' actually mean? 31.8.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
What does 'climate risk' actually mean? Joel Makower Mon, 08/31/2020 - 02:11 If you stick around the world of sustainable business long enough, you’re sure to see an immutable march of memes — terms that rise up and become popularized, often without agreed-upon definitions. Then, over time, they become used, and overused, to the point where they lose much of their meaning. Or, at least, they can mean whatever you want them to mean. Some of those memes get traction — “zero waste” and “net zero” are two relatively recent examples that are having their moment. Others come and go — “responsibly sourced” anyone? Now comes “climate risk,” a term that has been kicking around for years — I first wrote about it back in 2013 — but that has risen to a point where major financial and governmental institutions around the world are baking it into their policies and programs. Last week, for example, the UK government proposed mandatory climate risk-related governance by large pension plans, to be disclosed in line with ...
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Applying science and healthcare principles to soil wellness can help our planet 27.8.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Applying science and healthcare principles to soil wellness can help our planet Poornima Param… Thu, 08/27/2020 - 01:00 Basic human health principles tell us that we should diagnose before we treat and that we should test before we diagnose.  From annual physicals and screenings to blood tests and imaging exams, providers and specialists have many new tools and resources to address the health issues we experience in real-time and to prevent new issues from arising. For example, our deepening understanding of DNA helps us discern how drugs, medication, multi-vitamins or treatment plans work differently in patients — creating a brand-new frontier, personalized medicine. Today, by leveraging advancements in technology and new medical discoveries, we are able to treat and prevent diseases and enhance our quality of life, health and wellness. Take the influx of at-home genetic testing kits that provides data on food sensitivities, fertility and predispositions to disease. These same principles of human ...
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New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color 6.8.2020 GreenBiz.com
New local campaigns can bring cheaper and cleaner rooftop solar to communities of color Lacey Shaver Thu, 08/06/2020 - 00:20 There is a new urgency across the United States to address structural and systemic racial inequities in criminal justice , wealth and housing , employment , health care and education . These disparities are also pervasive in energy. One common measure of this is "energy burden," or the share of take-home income spent on energy bills. Communities of color have been shown to have a 24–27 percent higher energy burden than White Americans when controlling across income levels, and low-income residents experience an energy burden up to three times higher than high-income residents. Rooftop solar has the potential to reduce energy burden in communities of color, but it has not yet lived up to its potential due to systemic barriers: lack of solar education and outreach; financial challenges such as lower income and access to credit; and issues related to home ownership, such as lower ...
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Morgan Stanley will measure CO2 impact of loans and investments 27.7.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Morgan Stanley will measure CO2 impact of loans and investments Michael Holder Mon, 07/27/2020 - 00:15 Morgan Stanley has become the first major U.S. bank to commit to measuring and disclosing the climate impact of its loans and investments, announcing last week that it has joined a multi-trillion dollar group of global financial institutions developing a standardized method for carbon accounting. The U.S. bank has become the latest financial firm to join the Global Carbon Accounting Partnership (PCAF), a growing coalition which first began in the Netherlands in 2015 and now boasts 66 formal members from around the world representing more than $5.3 trillion in assets. In addition, Morgan Stanley also has joined the PCAF's steering committee alongside founding members Amalgamated Bank from the United States; Dutch banks Triodos, BN AMRO and ASN Bank; and the Alliance for Banking on Values (GABV). As a steering committee member, Morgan Stanley will "lend insights and expertise" to help PCAF develop the ...
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Apple embeds racial justice into new supply-chain carbon neutrality pledge 21.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Apple embeds racial justice into new supply-chain carbon neutrality pledge Heather Clancy Tue, 07/21/2020 - 04:13 Apple already has ventured far beyond most other companies when it comes to pushing for climate action within its supply chain.  Consider that it has convinced more than 70 Apple suppliers to use renewable energy to produce products on its behalf , an effort funded in part by close to $5 billion in green bonds issued by the technology giant as well as a dedicated pool of money in China.  Now, it's wandering farther into uncharted territory. With its latest set of combined sustainability commitments, Apple is pushing for carbon neutrality across its entire business by the end of this decade, including its supply chain and the life cycle for its products. Its own operations have been carbon neutral for some time, thanks in large part to its extensive investments in renewable energy projects. While every large company focuses to some extent on motivating suppliers to embrace sustainability ...
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8 cities share how racial justice is embedded into their climate plans 20.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
8 cities share how racial justice is embedded into their climate plans Jesse Klein Mon, 07/20/2020 - 02:00 As COVID-19 rampages through vulnerable minority populations with tragic consequences, and protests for racial justice surge among a similar demographic, city climate planners see a renewed focus on climate justice. The pandemic, in some ways, has been a trial run for the anticipated coming impacts of climate change — a not-so-distant future in which low-income and minority populations are the most at risk. As mayors make quick strategic changes to address the short-term COVID crisis, they are also in the midst of planning for similar long-term climate issues. Last week, the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group , an organization of mayors from around the global, launched a Detailed Agenda for Green and Just Recovery from COVID-19 to ensure that this crisis propels sustainable innovations instead of a return to old ways.  "Equity is really at the heart of our recovery in the city," said Mayor LaToya ...
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BofA, Goldman, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo launch center for climate-aligned finance 9.7.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
BofA, Goldman, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo launch center for climate-aligned finance Jesse Klein Thu, 07/09/2020 - 00:01 The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) is banking on banks to get us over the carbon-neutral finish line by 2050.  The nonprofit announced Wednesday that it’s partnering with four of the world’s largest financial institutions — Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America — to launch the Center for Climate-Aligned Finance . The center will serve as a hub for cross-sector collaboration, bringing traditional financial instruments to innovative ideas to decarbonize the planet.  "It’s not the responsibility of any single country or single sector," said Paul Bodnar, managing director for climate finance at RMI. "But one sector provides the lifeblood that powers all the others and that’s finance."  A new buzzword, climate-aligned finance, is RMI’s answer to the uneven responsibility put on the financial sector. Its goal is to integrate the financial sector’s attempts at going green, ...
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How ESG issues can become even more relevant in times of market crisis 8.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
How ESG issues can become even more relevant in times of market crisis Shannon Houde Wed, 07/08/2020 - 00:40 As a Brit based in Santa Monica, California, Daniel E. Ingram is the chair of investment advisory company Wilshire’s ESG and Diversity Committee. Wilshire, which has more than $8.6 billion in assets under management and $168 billion in assets under advisement, recruited Ingram in 2017 as part of an effort to expand its ESG and socially responsible investing capabilities. Previously, Ingram was head of responsible investing for BT Pension Scheme, the United Kingdom’s largest corporate retirement plan. Ingram is also a member of the CFA Institute’s ESG working group responsible for defining an industry standard, along with representatives from the International Monetary Fund, BlackRock, the Principles for Responsible Investment and other prominent players in the responsible investment arena.  Ingram helps advise institutional asset owners on how to protect and grow long-term capital by integrating ...
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Activists push for Black land ownership in Seattle 7.7.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Protests over racial equity prompt investments in the city’s Black community.
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Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni 29.6.2020 GreenBiz.com
Where are they now? Catch up with 30 Under 30 alumni Heather Clancy Mon, 06/29/2020 - 02:30 June 22 marked the publication of the fifth annual GreenBiz 30 Under 30 , our report celebrating rising young professionals in the field of corporate sustainability.  What’s up in the worlds of the 120 alumni from past lists? We reached out this spring to check in, asking those inclined to weigh in on how current events have changed their world views. We asked them to consider two questions: With the world turned upside down, what is your focus at work? Do you think the COVID-19 crisis marks a turning point for the sustainability movement?  Following are some of their responses, lightly edited, representing perspective from all four past cohorts. We did not specifically ask the alumni to consider the broader question of systemic racism, as our outreach was completed prior to the national protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. But look for future updates and essays on this topic, such as ...
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Let’s incubate the Green Swans hatched by the COVID-19 Black Swan 23.6.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Let’s incubate the Green Swans hatched by the COVID-19 Black Swan Tom Baruch Tue, 06/23/2020 - 01:30 The global COVID-19 pandemic is a historic Black Swan event that offers a Green Swan of opportunities to harvest innovation from 50 years of converging exponential technologies. We are presented with a rare opportunity to invest in new innovations, rebuild our data and power infrastructures and supply chains to restore and strengthen the economy while healing the environment. According to author Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Black Swans are unexpected, hard-to-predict events that result in extreme, unintended consequences. The coronavirus pandemic is a classic Black Swan. Over the past few weeks, we have witnessed countries and states scrambling for personal protective equipment and ventilators. Oil tankers are carrying millions of tons of oil with nowhere to go. Farmers are destroying food and supermarket shelves are missing essential items across the nation. These events, made visible by the COVID-19 virus, ...
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3 keys for scaling nature-based solutions for climate adaptation 17.6.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published in World Resources Institute . In Indonesia, climate change is already a pernicious threat. More than 30 million people across northern Java suffer from coastal flooding and erosion related to more severe storms and sea level rise. In some places, entire villages and more than a mile of coastline have been lost to the sea. The flooding and erosion are exacerbated by the destruction of natural mangrove forests. These forests absorb the brunt of waves’ impact, significantly reducing both the height and speed of waves reaching shore. And mature mangroves can store nearly 1,000 tons of carbon per hectare, thus mitigating climate change while also helping communities adapt. Without mangroves, 18 million more people worldwide would suffer from coastal flooding each year (an increase of 39 percent). That’s why in Demak, Java, a diverse group of residents, NGOs, universities and the Indonesian government are working together on the "Building with Nature" project to restore a ...
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How the Navajo got their day in the sun 28.5.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
How the Navajo got their day in the sun Danny Kennedy Thu, 05/28/2020 - 02:00 In late March, during the early hours of the COVID-19 crisis, just as New Yorkers were realizing how many might die, a small solar development company closed a $4 million financing deal. "Closing" is never easy, but getting a half-dozen high-net-worth individuals, family offices and foundations to pony up as the world’s finance markets crashed around them was a triumph.  Getting the deal done was impressive in its own right, given that private equity had all but frozen in the weeks before and most venture-backed startups were running on fumes, telling their angel investors and anyone who’d listen that they had three months’ financial runway, or less. It seems even more important now, given the terrible toll COVID-19 is having right where the solar is planned: the Navajo Nation. A young team saddled with ambition and support from their tribal government, this largely native-owned company, Navajo Power , was getting ready to ...
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Bush Brothers counts on water reuse to reduce local impact of bean production 20.5.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Bush Brothers counts on water reuse to reduce local impact of bean production Jesse Klein Wed, 05/20/2020 - 03:20 "There was nothing except a pipe going out the back of the plant." This was how Rodney Aulick, president of integrated solutions and services at Evoqua Water Technologies, described the wastewater system at Bush Brothers and Company’s Tennessee plant, when it first engaged with the food company. Bush Brothers is the largest manufacturer of prepared beans in the United States, and its work with water treatment titan Evoqua resulted in massive improvements, Aulick said. The plant is now able to reuse much of its water, lowering the strain on the community system and environment as a whole. The company is also better equipped to tightly control its water usage, according to Evoqua.   Bush Brothers, a family-owned business, has been operating in the small community of Chestnut Hill, Tennessee, for over 110 years. The company keeps the community in mind when pushing for new production goals and ...
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How COVID-19 can shape the response to climate change 13.5.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
How COVID-19 can shape the response to climate change Terry F. Yosie Wed, 05/13/2020 - 02:31 Part Two of a four-part series. Part One can be found here . As the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to unfold, insights are emerging on how to repurpose what's been learned for the benefit of climate change mitigation. To date, most of the focus on the pandemic-environment nexus has been short-term. A number of environmental activists, for example, have recommended that temporarily reduced air pollution levels be made permanent through regulatory controls. Conversely, the Trump administration has used the pandemic as an argument to issue an open-ended suspension of the enforcement of environmental laws. These examples reflect the battle lines being drawn for an even larger conflict that is emerging over climate change policy.  Three key facts Three key facts highlight the growing stakes in play for climate change decision making. First, many parallels exist between arguments that deny the existence ...
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Sustainable infrastructure investments can aid the post-COVID recovery 5.5.2020 GreenBiz.com
Sustainable infrastructure investments can aid the post-COVID recovery Katherine Davisson Tue, 05/05/2020 - 04:23 The economic fallout caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is forcing governments around the world to come up with policies for stimulating the global economy. Many are considering a tried-and-true method to boost economies in the short term and provide wide societal benefits in the long term: infrastructure investment. Countries around the globe are set to launch the biggest round of infrastructure investment since the post-2008 financial crisis stimulus measures. It's easy to see why: Demand is enormous. The world is on-trend to face a  $15 trillion gap between the infrastructure investment needed and the amount provided by 2040 . On the supply side, when 1 percent of GDP is invested in infrastructure,  economic output increases by about 0.4 percent in the same year and by 1.5 percent four years later . Building in a new world Before the shovels hit the dirt, it's worth understanding how the ...
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The new normal in sustainable investing post-COVID-19 4.5.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
The time has passed for small commitments, hyperbole and delays in embracing sustainable investing.
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