User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Regional
Category: Specific Organisms :: Birds
Last updated: Jul 25 2016 20:00 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Drones: the good, the bad and the ugly 25.7.2016 High Country News Most Recent
As the aerial technology increases in popularity, so do its impacts.
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BLM moves away from landmark Northwest Forest Plan 25.7.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Court showdown may force the agency to reconsider its Pacific Northwest logging goals.
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Take care of Colorado’s great outdoors and it will take care of us 22.7.2016 Denver Post: Opinion
It’s easy to understand why we celebrate Colorado River Day on July 25 each year, the day the Colorado River was officially renamed from the Grand to the Colorado in 1921.
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Feds fine Evraz steel in Pueblo more than $103,000 over safety violations 16.7.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Pueblo's main steel mill was fined more than $100,000 after it was cited for a number of workplace safety issues, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration said Friday.
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Levels of some 'air toxics' along Wasatch Front are above what EPA says is cancer-causing 13.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Scientists at Utah’s Division of Air Quality are zeroing in on a few key chemicals after a newly released study of toxic air pollutants found elevated levels of hazardous substances on the Wasatch Front. The year-long effort, which looked at 86 of the more than 180 substances classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as “hazardous air pollutants,” or air toxics, identified four areas of concern — airborne lead particles, particularly on the western side of the Salt Lake Valley; localized...
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New study finds elevated levels of hazardous 'air toxics' along Wasatch Front 12.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Scientists at Utah’s Division of Air Quality are zeroing in on a few key chemicals after a newly released study of toxic air pollutants found elevated levels of hazardous substances on the Wasatch Front. The year-long effort, which looked at 86 of the more than 180 substances classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as “hazardous air pollutants,” or air toxics, identified four areas of concern — airborne lead particles, particularly on the western side of the Salt Lake Valley; localized... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Utah anglers signing up for and completing cutthroat slam 12.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Interest among anglers wishing to complete Utah’s Cutthroat Slam appears to be high. What, exactly, is the cutthroat slam? It is a program established by the Division of Wildlife Resources and Trout Unlimited encouraging anglers to catch the four species of cutthroat trout that are native to Utah. Those are the Bear River, Bonneville, Colorado River and Yellowstone. Those who complete the slam receive a medallion and certificate. Cost to enter is $20 for adults and $10 for youth 18 and under, wi... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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2 children killed in I-70 crash in Eagle County 12.7.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Two children were killed and two other children and a woman were injured in a crash on Interstate 70 in Eagle County on Monday afternoon.
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Patrols up in New Mexico after rare species of owl killed 11.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Santa Fe, N.M. • More officers have been put on patrol in the Caja del Rio area near Santa Fe after the reported killing of a burrowing owl, a federal land management official said. Such a killing is rare, and the incident is being taken seriously, Bureau of Land Management spokeswoman Donna Hummel said. The species is among those protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported (http://bit.ly/2a0dE0L). “There are lots of eyes and ears and people that care about w... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Are Utah taxpayers footing bill for land-transfer lawyers' lavish travel? 6.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Lawyers and other consultants promoting Utah’s bid to take control of public lands have billed the state for luxury travel as well as for work that appears outside the scope of their contracts, according to a review of invoices posted on the Utah Legislature’s website. One lawyer spent $3,100 at Salt Lake City’s finest hotels and regularly flew first class, courtesy of Utah taxpayers. The Legislature’s Commission for the Stewardship of Public Lands last year hired the New Orleans law firm Davil... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Editorial: Utah needs to spend money to preserve sensitive lands 6.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
“You need to listen to what the land is telling you.” — John Ferry The land is not — at least, not always — telling us to dig it up, pave it over and otherwise treat it as a disposable commodity. That’s why John Ferry, a Box Elder County farmer and rancher, and his family have donated a conservation easement over a small but important sliver of their land along the Bear River to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The 30-acre bit of wetlands, near an existing bird refuge, is the first step...
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Small gift initiates huge Bear River conservation effort 4.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
John Ferry’s farm and ranch occupies a large piece of Box Elder County along the Bear River, but the family has held a slice for ducks, deer and other wildlife that congregate in the fecund delta where the river meets the Great Salt Lake. This week the Ferrys donated a conservation easement on this land to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), inaugurating an ambitious plan to keep agricultural lands in agricultural hands in one of the West’s most biologically rich landscapes. The Ferrys’ do... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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What if I’m not white? 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A former sports writer tries to find a place for himself in the outdoors.
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Meet the group that’s turning artists into nature’s advocates 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
In the Oregon backcountry, an experiment in using art to elevate environmental issues.
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Meet the new advocates for the West 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A generation of young Western activists are using outdoor sports as a step towards conservation.
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Evicted by climate change 24.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Government regulations forced the Yup’ik to give up their semi-nomadic existence. Now, the land where they settled is vanishing.
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UN says 65 million people displaced in 2015, a new record 20.6.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
The U.N. refugee agency says just over that number — 65 million people — were displaced worldwide by the end of last year.
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Routt, Moffat counties &#39;launch&#39; assault against noxious invader on Yampa River 18.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
A flotilla of brightly colored river rafts carrying elected officials and experts in the field of noxious weeds set out June 16 for a “three hour cruise” on the Yampa River and found a monster in disguise amidst views of healthy cottonwood galleries where bald eagles watched stoically from the branches. Deer and elk, sandhill cranes and great blue herons made cameo appearances on Thursday. But the reason behind the otherwise idyllic float on the Yampa was to plot the demise of an invader. The noxious weed known as leafy spurge threatens to undermine the lush pastures and hay meadows that stretch from Hayden to Craig, as well as the natural community of plants and animals along the river. “Leafy Spurge is aggressively crowding out other plants, and it has amazing survival strategies,” retired Bureau of Land Management field manager John Husband told the group. If public and private land managers believe they can simply cut the plant down to be rid of it, leafy spurge only sends its roots 20 feet deeper ...
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Chamber expects more than 11K visitors in town today 18.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Approximately 11,500 visitors are expected to be in town today, according to the Steamboat Springs Chamber Resort Association’s lodging barometer released Wednesday, June 15. The figure represents 74 percent capacity at area lodging properties, with downtown occupancy at 100 percent. On the mountain, hotels are forecast at 85 percent capacity, and condos are expected to be 64 percent full. Lodging is expected to decrease to 4,800 visitors by Wednesday. June 22. The chamber’s lodging barometer is based on survey data from local lodging properties. Its primary function is to help businesses determine staffing levels during the winter and summer tourism seasons. Actual lodging occupancy levels tend to increase from the forecast levels as a result of last-minute bookings. Mustang Roundup street closures planned for today Street closures have been announced for the Rocky Mountain Mustang Roundup’s Show and Shine event today. The following streets will be closed from 5:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ■ Lincoln Avenue, ...
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Routt, Moffat counties launch naval assault against noxious invader on Yampa River 18.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
A flotilla of brightly colored river rafts carrying elected officials and noxious weeds experts set out June 16 for a “three-hour cruise” on the Yampa River and found a monster in disguise amidst views of healthy cottonwood galleries where bald eagles watched stoically from the branches. Deer and elk, sandhill cranes and great blue herons made cameo appearances on Thursday. But the reason behind the otherwise idyllic float on the Yampa was to plot the demise of an invader. A noxious weed known as leafy spurge threatens to undermine the lush pastures and hay meadows that stretch from Hayden to Craig, as well as the natural community of plants and animals along the river. “Leafy spurge is aggressively crowding out other plants, and it has amazing survival strategies,” retired Bureau of Land Management field manager John Husband told the group. Public and private land managers cannot simply cut the plant down to be rid of it, because leafy spurge only sends its roots 20 feet deeper into the ground and ...
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