User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Regional
Category: Problems :: Deforestation
Last updated: Apr 22 2017 13:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Want to own a town? Tiny Oregon community for sale for $3.5M 22.4.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
In the tiny, dying timber town of Tiller, the old cliche is true. If you blink, you might actually miss it.
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Wasatch Plateau meadows to be harvested for new cancer drugs 15.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Cow cabbage, which flourishes in mountain meadows of the U.S. Southwest, was once seen as a worthless invasive weed targeted for eradication by ranchers. But the toxic roots of the native plant holds compounds that could help combat cancer and a Utah entrepreneur hopes to harvest it in the Manti-La Sal National Forest to supply researchers testing new therapies. The Wasatch Plateau is the best place to harvest cow cabbage, known by the scientific name Veratrum californicum, because plants growin...
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What scientists do in Colorado’s federally backed climate science facilities 14.4.2017 Denver Post: All Political News
Scientists at federally funded facilities in Colorado conduct basic research aimed at understanding climate-change impacts — from worsening wildfires to uncertain water supplies — so that people can adapt.
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Teen indicted, arrested on murder charge in Thornton shooting death of 16-year-old Haley Vargaz 12.4.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
An 18-year-old man has been indicted and arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder in the fatal September shooting of 16-year-old Haley Vargaz, who was killed while at a house party in Thornton.
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Poachers kill rare one-horned rhino in southern Nepal forest 10.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Kathmandu, Nepal • Authorities are searching for poachers who killed a rare one-horned rhinoceros over the weekend in the forests of southern Nepal and cut off the horn, officials said Sunday. Forest officer Nurendra Aryal said it was the first killing of a rhino in the Chitwan National Forest in nearly three years. Soldiers and forest rangers were scouring the forests and nearby areas for the people who shot the rhino. The dead animal was discovered on Saturday. Aryal said it was a stormy night...
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California’s backcountry drug war 30.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Dangerous drug cartels are growing pot on public lands—putting wildlife, water supplies, and outdoor enthusiasts at grave risk.
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Oregon may sell a state forest that’s no longer profitable 24.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Elliott State Forest shows the difficult balance between profit and conservation.
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Growing up in timber country 6.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A writer returns to the old-growth forest of her youth.
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Denver Water tree-thinning effort to protect watershed, prevent fires is expanded to private property 28.2.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Tree-thinning intended to help heal the West’s ailing forests has become an essential part of providing water for citydwellers: Denver Water, state and federal officials on Monday renewed a $33 million deal for work on 40,000 acres of public land and also on more than 5,000 acres of private land.
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Forest Service came to the rescue for turn-of-the-century Utah 15.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
When Utahns recreate in national forest lands close to population centers, the beauty of clear-flowing mountain streams, shaded public campgrounds, lush meadows and hills covered with pine trees and aspens can be taken for granted. Things were not always this way, especially in the late 1800s and early 1900s when overgrazing, uncontrolled timber harvests and issues with mining resulted in denuded forests and some flooding in the valleys. The result was that, in many instances, Utah state and loc...
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Latest: Senators aim to revive rural funding 13.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the meantime, states tighten their belts.
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Federal hiring freeze hits Western land agencies 26.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
It’s not clear what will happen with seasonal hires such as wildland firefighters.
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Why a scientist cut down ‘the oldest living tree’ 12.1.2017 Writers on the Range
The Prometheus Tree in Nevada was nearly 5,000 years old when it was cut down. It could have lived a lot longer.
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The US isn't the only big country at risk of backsliding on climate change 29.12.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Environmental advocates are worried that President-elect Donald Trump will try to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement - and a recent scientific analysis says that if he does and other major countries follow suit, the consequence could be dire, tipping the world toward a dangerous level of global warming. But what other countries might also fail to keep their promises to the world under that agreement? Recently, concerns have grown about the seventh-largest emitter, Brazil...
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Obama’s lasting legacies in the West 26.12.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Under the 44th president, the West re-examined its relationship to energy and the climate.
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Op-ed: Save Simba by skipping the hamburger 18.12.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
In the Tribune, I find that our new Eccles Theater will host “The Lion King.” This is the world’s number one musical because children and families love animals. Wild animals — from Africa to India to the Amazon — inspire our children but are losing their homes. Believe it or not, one important way to save those real animals is by eating more vegetables and less meat. Have you ever met someone who doesn’t like elephants? Me either. In fact, I don’t think I have even heard negative sentiment ab...
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Tongass forest plan eyes young-growth timber 10.12.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Juneau, Alaska • Plans for managing the nation’s largest national forest call for changes in timber harvests that one critic says will be “the demise of the timber industry as we know it right now.” The Tongass National Forest released a management plan update Friday that it says will emphasize young-growth timber sales in the forest, which covers much of southeast Alaska, and allow for a logging rate that it says will meet projected timber demand. This stems from a 2013 memo from U.S. Agricultu...
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Community Agriculture Alliance: More than just a Christmas tree 9.12.2016 Steamboat Pilot
The tradition in many local families, as in many families throughout the globe, is to tromp into the woods and cut down a Christmas tree each holiday season. Whether it is your tradition or not, cutting down a Christmas tree is an act whose benefits can extend far beyond providing a house with a holiday twinkle. When you cut down a tree, you are essentially harvesting it; it is removed from the forest and put to use in a different manner, becoming one of the many products we get from our forests. The gap it leaves behind is not only a gaping hole — it is a chance for the trees close by to grow larger and healthier with the extra space, water and other resources that become available. It is a chance for the grasses and whortleberry, and maybe even a few aspen sprouts, to take up residence in the new-found sunshine. It is a chance to renew the forest. As you see, the act of harvesting a tree provides much more than just a Christmas tree. As the season for cutting Christmas trees is upon us, we challenge ...
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How to love a weird and perfect wilderness 28.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A desolate Oregon landscape offers lessons on the modern wild.
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Clearcutting the Tongass National Forest is dead wrong 17.11.2016 Writers on the Range
To avert the worst climate change impacts, old forests and their massive carbon reserves must be protected.
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