User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Amphibians
Last updated: May 20 2016 23:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,878    
10 magical places saved by endangered species 20.5.2016 TreeHugger
In our efforts to save animals at risk of extinction, we've saved some extraordinary places as well.
Also found in: [+]
Is the EPA Being Pressured? Environmental Concerns About Syngenta Chemical Removed From EPA Site 13.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Farm equipment sprays crops. (Photo: Chafer Machinery ; Edited: LW / TO) The Environmental Protection Agency released a very troubling preliminary risk assessment that the routine use of the chemical atrazine is likely harming animals and our ecosystems. Atrazine is manufactured and distributed by  Syngenta , a foreign global chemical company, that markets the product in the US to limit plants that may compete with commodity crops or would be considered weeds on golf courses. The EPA memo that was released was hand-signed by six scientists in the US government's Environmental Risk Branch of the Environmental Fate and Effects Division. The 500+ page study was co-authored by Dr. Frank T. Farrugia, Colleen M. Rossmeisl, Dr. James A. Hetrick, and Melanie Biscoe, and was subject to peer review by twelve other scientists. Its top-line findings are "based on the results from hundreds of toxicity studies on the effects of atrazine on plants and animals, over 20 years of surface water monitoring data, and higher ...
Also found in: [+]
Pilot Breaks Rules To Save Animals From Fort McMurray Fire 13.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For pilot Keith Mann, loading dozens of animals onto his plane in order to evacuate them from the historic Fort McMurray wildfire in Canada was the right thing to do, even if it was against the rules. Nearly 90,000 people were forced to flee from the wildfire that raged through Alberta last week, in what is likely to be the country's costliest natural disaster . As citizens of Fort McMurray relocated to camps for refuge, many struggled with how to bring along their furry friends. Some were even  forced to leave them behind . The energy company Suncor, which has an airport located northwest of Fort McMurray, offered its planes to fly evacuees south of the blaze. On Tuesday, around 300 citizens showed up at the airport -- with nearly 100 animals in tow. "The terminal was quite a sight," Mann said. "Just full of animals." Mann, Suncor’s manager of flight operations, said that he quickly realized the dilemma. "I didn’t want our personnel to be faced with the decision of whether to separate these people from ...
Also found in: [+]
Court Hearing Will Focus on EPA's Failure to Protect Nation's Endangered Wildlife From Pesticides 6.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals will hear arguments Monday, May 9 in the most comprehensive legal action ever brought under the Endangered Species Act to protect rare and threatened plants and animals from pesticides in the United States. The Center for Biological Diversity and Pesticide Action Network North America are challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s systemic failure to assess the impacts of more than 30 pesticides known to be harmful to dozens of endangered species found across the ...
Also found in: [+]
EPA Finds Atrazine Likely Harming Most Species of Plants, Animals in U.S. 4.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The amount of the herbicide atrazine that’s released into the environment in the United States is likely harming most species of plants and animals, including mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles, according to a preliminary risk assessment by the Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine is well known as a hormone disruptor that has been linked to birth defects and cancer in humans and contamination of ground-, surface- and drinking-water ...
Also found in: [+]
In Memory of the Woman Who Helped Bears in Distress 29.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Else Poulsen with Grace, an American black bear, at a refuge center in New Jersey. Poulsen, a bear behavioralist, died last week. Photograph by Angela Kyle, courtesy of the Bear Care Group Few people know bears as intimately as author and bear behavioralist Else Poulsen, who died on April 15 in her home in Ontario, Canada, after a battle with cancer. She was 61. If ever there was a bear whisperer, Poulsen was one. She raised bears, comforted bears, taught bears, learned from bears, had bears communicate their needs to her, and nursed bears back to health. She shared in the joy of a polar bear discovering soil under her paws for the first time in 20 years, felt the pride of a cub learning to crack nuts with her molars. She also grieved at the barbarity of captivity for Asian black bears in China and Vietnam, which is how she and I bonded, as I'd been researching bear bile trafficking and bile farms for my book Animal Investigators. "Nothing stumped her," says Jill Robinson, who often sought Poulsen's ...
Also found in: [+]
The Dithering Dozen: Twelve Prominent Climate Deniers 25.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Back in 2007, arguably the most leader-like thing Alaska Governor Sarah Palin could have done was her executive order establishing a state "Climate Change Sub-Cabinet." Her order reads, "Climate change is not just an environmental issue It is also a social, cultural, and economic issue important to all Alaskans." She went there. But nowadays, with the knob on her cray-cray meter cranked up to eleven, she says  climate change is a hoax . This week, she metaphorically donned an Alaskan tinfoil toque to pitch Climate Hustle, a new climate denial documentary. "We're told by fearmongers that global warming is due to man's activities and this presents strong arguments against that in a very relatable way," she said in an interview with the political journal Variety Daily. Then, as I stewed about how shedding one's rationality has become a cherished political talent in America, I ran down the list of politicians and media figures who, in playing to their conservative base, have abruptly decided that everything ...
Also found in: [+]
Spotted bats, ptarmigan, lynx, other wildlife prioritized in Colorado 8.4.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Colorado unveiled wildlife-saving priorities for the next decade, aiming to ensure survival of 210 imperiled species including lynx, wolverines, prairie chickens, frogs, ptarmigan, ...
Also found in: [+]
Time Is Running Out To See The Photo Ark: One Man's Journey to Save the World's Most Endangered Species 1.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Each and every one of Earth's creatures are precious. Even those that are covered in scales, have eight legs or are as small as a thumbnail. We saw the world's uproar in 2015 when Cecil the Lion was killed illegally by a trophy hunter. But it does not matter whether majestic and beloved or forgotten about and slimy, half of the world's plant and animal species will soon be threatened by extinction. Each time we lose a species, we don't just lose a curious sight, we lose opportunities for medical research and a greater understanding of ourselves, we lose a link in the chain of our fragile ecosphere that protects our food, our water and our air. Issues around endangerment and extinction are complicated and often polarizing. It is far easier to turn a blind eye than to care about the last remaining frog of it's kind halfway around the world. Often times though it is not willful ignorance that causes inaction, but just simply not knowing. How can you know, care and connect to an animal that you may not have ...
Also found in: [+]
Critically endangered Lake Titicaca frogs find refuge at Denver Zoo 25.3.2016 Denver Post: Local
It's not easy being green, critically endangered and hunted as a form of South American Viagra, but for 20 Lake Titicaca frogs life should be less dangerous now that they've found refuge at the Denver ...
Also found in: [+]
'FARC frog' caught up in Colombian conflict 17.3.2016 Yahoo: Politics

Stuffed "Atelopus Farci" frogs, named after the Farc guerilla fighters, at the National University of Colombia, in BogotaNow, despite their olive-green camo, both the FARC and the frog have disappeared from the creature's sole habitat, a mountainside forest in central Colombia, near the town of Alban. "Cloaked in camouflage and hiding out in the forest, (the frog) immediately reminded me of the FARC," said Lynch, a professor at the National University of Colombia.


Also found in: [+]
Inside a tiny 'tropical forest' 7.3.2016 CNN: Top Stories
With the iconic Table Mountain, pristine beaches and nature's finest beasts roaming game parks just a short drive away, it's easy to see why Cape Town continues to be one of the world's favorite tourist destinations.
Also found in: [+]
Finding the 'Unexpected' in South Jersey 28.2.2016 Philly.com News
Veronica Van Hof's nearest neighbors are ducks, beavers, Pine Barrens tree frogs, and nearly 180 other species of birds, mammals, and reptiles. And she watches over them all.
Also found in: [+]
State wildlife officials begin wildlife status reviews 25.2.2016 AP Washington
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- State wildlife officials say they are beginning wildlife status reviews on species that are listed by the state as endangered, threatened or sensitive....
Also found in: [+]
Whoops! 12 Tales Of Accidental Brilliance In Science 25.2.2016 NPR News
You nominated 300 cool stories of scientific surprise for Skunk Bear's Golden Mole Award. Our shortlist has it all: circuits painted with light, imperceptible genitalia, and a terrifying frog.
Also found in: [+]
Trust Us, You Don't Want To Be Caught In A Bat Tornado 25.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
You couldn't get us within 100 miles of this place, but we'll gladly watch 20 million bats in a feeding frenzy from the safety of our computer screen. As for Kelly Sweet, the National Geographic producer who gets caught in a bat tornado in the video above, hats off to her. However, we recommend she keep her hat on. "You could not safely stand there because they will fly into you and get stuck in your hair," she says in the YouTube description. The clip, posted earlier this month, features a guano-load of Mexican free-tailed bats, also known as Tadarida brasiliensis,  flying out of Bracken Cave near San Antonio, Texas. It's home to the largest bat colony in the world, National Geographic says, and it hosts one heckuva buffet outside. On this hunt, which happens nightly between March and October before the bats migrate south, they consumed 200 tons of insects, the video says. Each bat can consume three times its body weight, according to Untamed Science. This isn't some fleeting all-you-can-eat. Mexican ...
Also found in: [+]
Finishing third in S.C. would be a huge setback for Cruz 19.2.2016 Washington Post
After Nikki Haley’s endorsement, Marco Rubio may have the momentum to overtake Ted Cruz for second ...
Also found in: [+]
Frogs Are Really Cool. Too Bad Humans Are Killing Them All 15.2.2016 Wired Top Stories
In the age of human-induced mass extinction, frogs face great peril, which makes cataloging and understanding them of urgent ...
Also found in: [+]
Dominion outlines new national forest route for pipeline 12.2.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Energy companies behind the Atlantic Coast Pipeline have carved a new proposed route through national forests in West Virginia and Virginia. The alternate released Friday is in response to federal concerns about the national gas pipeline’s initial path through sensitive areas. Dominion Resources Inc. says the new route would reduce by […]
Also found in: [+]
Biodiversity Loss and the Doomsday Clock: An Invisible Disaster Almost No One is Talking About 11.2.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Phil Torres

As of this month, the UN World Meteorological Organization, NASA, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) all confirmed that 2015 was the warmest year on record by “a big margin,” beating the previous record set by 2014. In fact, fourteen of the hottest years on record have all occurred after 2000.

Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,878