User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Amphibians
Last updated: Jul 24 2014 24:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,492    
This Is Where Confiscated Wildlife Items Go To Die Another Death 23.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Don't be fooled by the building's unremarkable exterior; inside this staid warehouse northeast of Denver resides one of the world's largest concentrations of items from the illegal wildlife trade. The 22,000-square-foot warehouse, officially called the " National Wildlife Property Repository ," belongs to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and contains upward of a million items, ranging from ivory and furs to stuffed tiger fetuses. In a video published Tuesday, The Atlantic offered a revealing look inside the repository, in addition to the National Eagle Repository next door. Some of the items are destroyed after arriving at the repository -- including nearly 6 tons of ivory which were crushed at a high-profile event last year -- while other artifacts live on in conservation agencies, to be used as instructional tools in the fight against the illegal wildlife trade. " People will buy just about anything ," says Doni Sprague, a wildlife repository specialist, reflecting on the devastating range of artifacts ...
Also found in: [+]
Arturo, 'World's Saddest Bear,' Won't Be Moved, Argentine Zoo Says 23.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, living in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza, 650 miles west of Buenos Aires, is pictured at his enclosure on Feb. 5, 2014. Specialists and activists are lobbying to transfer old Arturo to a zoo in Canada to spare him from the Argentine heat. MENDOZA, Argentina (AP) — Argentina's last captive polar bear will remain in the country despite a petition by more than a half million people asking that it be moved to Canada. The director of the Mendoza Zoo in western Argentina told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the 28-year-old bear is too old to safely be relocated. Animal rights advocates say the bear, named Arturo, paces nervously in his concrete enclosure and they suggest the animal suffers from depression. They have campaigned to move the bear to a zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba, which has welcomed the idea. Even former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich has rallied to the cause. "If you love animals the way I do, please sign the petition to help the Argentinian polar ...
Also found in: [+]
Cameras near A.C. Expressway to study area snakes 22.7.2014 Philly.com News
The hope is that the secretive northern pine snake, a large white constrictor with black and brown blotches, will mug for the cameras being mounted near the wildlife crossings beneath the Atlantic City Expressway.
Also found in: [+]
This Intrepid 84-Year-Old Woman Saved Her Neighbor's Dog From Wild Coyotes 21.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When faced with a heart-stopping situation, one brave Bensenville, Illinois, woman didn't hesitate to step up to the plate. On July 11, 84-year-old Dolores "Dolly" Jefferson was getting a cup of coffee, when she heard a "commotion" in her backyard , the Daily Herald reported. She looked outside and was greeted by an alarming site: Five coyotes had surrounded her neighbor's dog, Roxie. The octogenarian sprung into action. Roxie, a 26-pound Egyptian fairhound, had been bitten on the nose by one of the animals, Pet360 reported, luckily, she escaped with just minor injuries and is expected to make a full recovery. Rich Parent, Jefferson's neighbor and Roxie's owner, was at home at the time of the attack, but he was splitting wood and couldn't hear the ruckus. " Another five or 10 seconds delay by Dolly and Roxie would not be here," he told NBC Chicago. Parent expressed his gratitude for Jefferson's fearlessness, and has since bought a bullhorn for her to use if she sees coyotes in their area again, NBC ...
Also found in: [+]
As Gray Seal Populations Boom, So Do Conflicts As Residents Decry Those They Once Protected 20.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ROCKLAND, Maine (AP) — Decades after gray seals were all but wiped out in New England waters, the population has rebounded so much that some frustrated residents are calling for a controlled hunt. The once-thriving New England gray seal population was decimated by the mid-20th century because of hunting, with Massachusetts keeping a seal bounty on the books until the 1960s. But scientists say conservation efforts, an abundance of food and migration from Canada combined to revive the population. Environmentalists cheer the resurgence, saying the gray seal boost is good for biodiversity and a boon for popular seal watch tours in coastal New England. But many fishermen say the seals interfere with fishing charters and steal catch. Beachgoers bemoan the 600-plus-pound seals taking over large stretches of shore, befouling beaches and attracting sharks, which feed on seals. Some residents of Nantucket are so fed up over the huge seal population that now calls the affluent island home that they have suggested a ...
Also found in: [+]
Rare, Blue-Colored Red King Crab Gains Celebrity In Alaska 18.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

NOME, Alaska (AP) — A rare blue-colored red king crab was part of a fisherman's catch earlier this month in Nome, Alaska.


KNOM reports (http://is.gd/NQ1wSP) Frank McFarland found the blue crab in his pot when fishing on July Fourth off Nome. The blue crab is being kept alive at the Norton Sound Seafood Center until McFarland can have it mounted.


The rare crab has become a rock star of sorts, with people showing up at the center to have their photos taken with it.


Scott Kent, with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Nome, says he has no idea why the red king crab is blue, but suspects it's just a mutation.


Kent says a blue crab "turns up once in a blue moon."

Also found in: [+]
Obama Opens East Coast To Oil Exploration For First Time In Decades Amid Wildlife Concerns 18.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The Obama administration is reopening the Eastern Seaboard to offshore oil and gas exploration, announcing final approval Friday of sonic cannons that can pinpoint energy deposits deep beneath the ocean floor. The decision promises to create plenty of jobs and thrills the oil industry, but dismays environmentalists worried about the immediate impact as well as the long-term implications of oil development. The cannons fill waters shared by whales and turtles with sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine. Saving endangered species was the environmental groups' best hope of extending a ban against offshore drilling off the U.S. Atlantic coast. The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management disclosed its final approval first to The Associated Press ahead of an announcement later Friday. The approval opens the outer continental shelf from Delaware to Florida to exploration by energy companies preparing to apply for drilling leases in 2018, when current congressional limits ...
Also found in: [+]
Cat Sleeps Like He's Been Shot (PHOTO) 17.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
No he's not. This cat is sleeping on a bed, but he looks like he's been shot. Story continues after cat that hasn't been shot ... This picture is driving Reddit wild, but that doesn't mean it's the only picture of a cat sleeping funny. Look at this one, or this one. And that's just the tip of the cats sleeping funny iceberg, people. We know you have other photos. Send them to us. Earlier this week, we asked you to send in pictures of weird trees and nobody sent us anything. Don't let that happen ...
Also found in: [+]
Go West, Young Dog, Because That's Where You'll Get Surfing Lessons 16.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What is dog surfing? It's a sporting event we can really get behind, is what it is. In early September, about 80 canine beach bums will take to the waves, for the annual Surf Dog Surf-A-Thon dog surfing competition . They'll do it on their paws, for a good cause: the contest is a fundraiser for the Helen Woodward Animal Center , a rescue group that adopts out homeless animals and brings therapy pets into hospitals and retirement homes, in addition to encouraging dogs to partake in water sports. "Dogs are probably better surfers than humans. They have better balance and have an easier time getting out an surfing than most people do. In fact, most surfers even say their dogs are better surfers. Dogs kind of have it, paws down," says Jessica Gercke, a spokesperson for the group. "Many of them have been doing it for years." This is Dozer, a handsome English bulldog who is last year's HWAC Surf Dog Surf-A-Thon winner . Dozer enjoys snacking, snoring and "chasing beach babes" when he isn't riding the waves, ...
Also found in: [+]
Crab Steals Dude's Beer, Is Totally Rude About It (VIDEO) 14.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Nobody likes to end a night of drinking with crabs. Sadly, the cameraman in the video above was a victim of crabs when a crab stole his beer. He protests and even tries to take the beer back, but the crab's claw is too much for his puny human grip. The crab gets extra cool points for looking his victim in the eye and backing away slowly as the appropriately named artist "Gotye" plays in the ...
Also found in: [+]
Hints Of Hope Emerge In Deadly American Bat Plague 13.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. About 6 million American bats have died from white-nose syndrome since its mysterious 2006 debut, and the disease's rapid spread still threatens the survival of some species. But if scientists are right about a few little brown bats in the U.S. Northeast, there may finally be a light at the end of the tunnel. A new study from Vermont suggests up to 96 percent of little brown bats survived last winter's hibernation in Aeolus Cave, a major bat hangout that has been riddled with white-nose syndrome (WNS) since 2008. First reported by the Associated Press, this is at least the third known case of WNS seemingly losing its grip on a bat colony. Two caves in New York have shown similar hints of recovery, and biologists in Vermont also recently found the rate of that state's bat die-off may be slowing down . The Aeolus Cave researchers radio-tagged 442 little brown bats before hibernation began last fall, then installed equipment to record how many tagged ...
Also found in: [+]
Researchers Rush To Save Hellbenders, North America's Largest Salamander 10.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
CORYDON, Ind. (AP) — With a long, slimy body and beady eyes, North America's largest salamander wouldn't top any cutest animal lists. The hellbender's alien appearance and mysterious ways have earned the big amphibian a bad reputation and unflattering nicknames ranging from snot otter to devil dog. But hellbenders, which can grow two or more feet long, are facing troubles bigger than an image problem. The aquatic creatures found only in swift-flowing, rocky rivers and streams are disappearing from large parts of the 16 states they inhabit. The rare amphibians breathe almost entirely through their skin, making them a living barometer of water quality because of their sensitivity to silt and pollution, said Rod Williams, a Purdue University associate professor of herpetology who's tracked Indiana's hellbenders for nearly a decade. "These are animals that live up to 30 years in the wild, so if you have populations declining, that alerts us that there could be a problem with the water quality," he said. The ...
Also found in: [+]
Researchers try to save huge US salamander 10.7.2014 Twincities.com: Nation
CORYDON, Ind. (AP) — With a long, slimy body and beady eyes, North America's largest salamander wouldn't top any cutest animal lists.
Researchers try to save huge US salamander 10.7.2014 AP National
CORYDON, Ind. (AP) -- With a long, slimy body and beady eyes, North America's largest salamander wouldn't top any cutest animal lists. The hellbender's alien appearance and mysterious ways have earned the big amphibian a bad reputation and unflattering nicknames ranging from snot otter to devil dog....
Also found in: [+]
Researchers try to save huge US salamander 10.7.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
CORYDON, Ind. (AP) — With a long, slimy body and beady eyes, North America's largest salamander wouldn't top any cutest animal lists. The hellbender's alien appearance and mysterious ways have earned the big amphibian a bad reputation and unflattering nicknames ranging from snot otter to devil ...
Also found in: [+]
This Duck Of Justice Is The Coolest Duck Of Justice 9.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Police here believe they have quacked the code for finding followers on social media. The 80-officer Bangor Police Department, which serves a city of about 33,000, has attracted more than 20,000 likes on its Facebook page after humorous pictures of a stuffed duck were added. The duck, dubbed "Duck of Justice" or "DOJ," appears in pictures of police cars, department members and K-9 cops, often accompanied with some pithy text about law enforcement. "I happen to believe that police officers are a pretty humorous bunch," said the man behind the duck, Sgt. Tim Cotton, a 17-year veteran Bangor officer with a fondness for the humor of George Carlin and Jim Gaffigan. "I want to read something that at least has some humorous undertones — I wouldn't connect to a page that I didn't want to read." Bangor is just one of many police departments nationwide discovering that using comedy on social media can help them interact with the public. One department, in 10,000-resident Brimfield Township, ...
Also found in: [+]
Woman Goes On All-Pet Food Diet For 30 Days To Make A Point 9.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. If you've been to a pet store lately, you've likely seen the variety of foods available for your kitty and canine friends. There's organic food, grain-free food , natural food and holistic food, and you can find kibble or canned food for virtually every specialized diet. With these kinds of options, it's no surprise the ingredients in much of our pets' food are just as nutritious as those in our own food. And one woman is out to prove it. Dorothy Hunter, who owns Paws Natural Pet Emporium in Richland, Washington, believes that the food she sells in her store is not only good for pets, but it's also good for people. To prove it, she's embarked on a 30-day pet food -only diet to raise awareness about the diets of people and their pets. "I believe in our products and how good they are. I actually believe our pets are eating better than us," she said on her YouTube channel . "With that said, for the next month, until July 19 … I’m going to eat dog food ...
Also found in: [+]
California red-legged frog named state amphibian 8.7.2014 San Jose Mercury News: News
The frog made famous in a tale by Mark Twain is now California's official state amphibian.
Also found in: [+]
How Your Old Cellphone Could Help Stop Illegal Logging And Poaching 8.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. Did you know that Americans throw away 150 million cellphones every year? Well now there's a new way to put some of those old phones to use. A startup called the Rainforest Connection plans to turn old, unwanted Android phones into sophisticated listening devices that can help prevent illegal logging and poaching. After a successful pilot to test the idea, the company has turned to the crowdfunding site Kickstarter to launch the project more broadly and is seeking $100,000 in funding. Here's how the idea works: Rainforest Connection will gather the phones, trick them out with special software, and hook them up to a microphone and an array of small solar panels. The modified devices will then be placed high in trees in vulnerable forests . The phones will be hidden away from the prying eyes of poachers, but they will still be able to spy on the surrounding rain forest. The microphone will pick up and identify certain sounds — chainsaws, gunshots, ...
Also found in: [+]
Feds Doubt Climate Change's Impact On Wolverines 8.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A top federal wildlife official said there's too much uncertainty about climate change to prove it threatens the snow-loving wolverine — overruling agency scientists who warned of impending habitat loss for the so-called "mountain devil." There's no doubt that the high-elevation range of wolverines is getting warmer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Director Noreen Walsh said. But any assumption about how that will change snowfall patterns is "speculation," Walsh said. She told her staff to prepare to withdraw a proposal to protect the animals under the Endangered Species Act. Walsh's comments were contained in a May 30 memo obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group. Fish and Wildlife Service spokesman Chris Tollefson confirmed that Walsh — who heads the agency's mountain-prairie region — authored the document. Agency Director Dan Ashe will have the final say, with a decision due Aug. 4. The animals max out at 40 pounds and are tough enough to ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,492