User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Amphibians
Last updated: Jun 21 2016 24:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Endangered Sonoma County Tiger Salamander Gets Recovery Plan 21.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In accordance with a settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a final recovery plan for the endangered Sonoma County population of the California tiger salamander . The plan calls for purchase and permanent protection of approximately 15,000 acres of the salamander’s breeding ponds and adjacent ...
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The Daily 202: Senate will vote down new gun laws today because of an intensity gap that favors the NRA 20.6.2016 Washington Post
The Daily 202: Senate will vote down new gun laws today because of an intensity gap that favors the NRA
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Rare toads (presumably) love him; off-roaders do not 16.6.2016 LA Times: Environment

Cantankerous outlaws and merciless nature are out to kill the arroyo toads of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties.

Like an ecological John Wayne, Sam Sweet — a big man with a beard and ponytail who at one point in his controversial career packed a .44 magnum — has spent his life trying to protect...

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Help for Hellbenders 14.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) is America's largest salamander. Like many amphibian species around the world, hellbenders are in trouble as human activity has degraded and destroyed their habitat. But hellbenders are getting some help. Thanks to an innovative conservation project spearheaded by the Ohio Division of Wildlife along with Toledo Zoo and other partners, the future of these slimy, prehistoric-looking creatures is looking a little brighter in Ohio. Growing to a length of up to two feet, these mottled brown salamanders are fully aquatic, living permanently in clear, swift-moving streams. Though broadly distributed throughout the Appalachian region from southern New York to northern Georgia, with populations in Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri, their stream habitat is under threat and the species has steeply declined. Hellbenders have strong legs to crawl around on stream bottoms and a large tail used to swim against robust currents. They also have folds of ...
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Students build robot to help Denver Zoo study endangered frogs in Peru 12.6.2016 Denver Post: Local
A group of 10 high school students Saturday tested an underwater robot they built to replace human divers in search of a rare frog at South America's Lake Titicaca.
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Lawsuit Launched Over Forest Service's Failure to Protect Rare California Frogs, Toads From Grazing 9.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a notice of intent to sue the U.S.

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This Popular Weed Killer Wreaks Havoc on Animals and Is Probably Hurting Us, Too 8.6.2016 Mother Jones
Atrazine, the second most commonly used herbicide in the United States, is mainly used to control weeds in the corn blanketing much of the Midwest. The chemical also routinely turns up in streams and drinking water . And according to a new Environmental Protection Agency preliminary risk assessment , it may be doing serious harm to fish, animals, and amphibians, even at extremely low exposure levels.  To figure whether a toxin is damaging ecosystems, EPA scientists crunch data from peer-reviewed research to establish what they call "levels of concern"—the threshold above which the chemical can be expected to cause harm. In the areas where it is most commonly used, mainly the Midwestern corn belt, atrazine turns up in the environment at rates that exceed established levels of concern "by as much as 22, 198, and 62 times for birds, mammals, and fish, respectively," the report concluded. As for amphibians like frogs, the report found "potential for chronic risk" from atrazine at real-world exposure ...
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Hundreds of toads hop free, offering hope for at-risk animal 2.6.2016 Seattle Times: Local

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Wildlife officials are releasing more than 900 toads in Wyoming, saying they could help researchers find ways for the endangered species and other amphibians to resist a devastating fungus. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are freeing the toads Wednesday at three places, including the Mortenson Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The […]
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Saving salamanders: Searching for signs of a deadly fungus 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Local

SUNDERLAND, Vt. (AP) — Holding a sandwich bag containing a squirming, Eastern red-spotted newt, Evan Grant inspects its shiny skin for signs of a killer. If he finds what he’s looking for, a gruesome fate awaits the amphibian. Ulcers would cover its body, eating away the skin and killing it outright or leaving it vulnerable […]
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Saving salamanders: Searching for signs of a deadly fungus 27.5.2016 AP National
SUNDERLAND, Vt. (AP) -- Holding a sandwich bag containing a squirming, Eastern red-spotted newt, Evan Grant inspects its shiny skin for signs of a killer....
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Mark Twain's famous frogs and a long-absent turtle species make their returns to Yosemite 26.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A type of frog made famous by Mark Twain will soon be hopping and swimming through Yosemite National Park after a decades-long absence, officials said Wednesday.

The California red-legged frog, named for its colorful legs and belly, vanished from the park more than 40 years ago. It is the type...

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Long missing frog, turtle species making return to Yosemite 26.5.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — A type of frog made famous by Mark Twain will soon be hopping and swimming through California’s Yosemite National Park after a decades-long absence, officials said Wednesday. The California red-legged frog, named for its colorful legs and belly, vanished from the park more than 40 years ago. It is the type […]
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10 magical places saved by endangered species 20.5.2016 TreeHugger
In our efforts to save animals at risk of extinction, we've saved some extraordinary places as well.
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Is the EPA Being Pressured? Environmental Concerns About Syngenta Chemical Removed From EPA Site 13.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Farm equipment sprays crops. (Photo: Chafer Machinery ; Edited: LW / TO) The Environmental Protection Agency released a very troubling preliminary risk assessment that the routine use of the chemical atrazine is likely harming animals and our ecosystems. Atrazine is manufactured and distributed by  Syngenta , a foreign global chemical company, that markets the product in the US to limit plants that may compete with commodity crops or would be considered weeds on golf courses. The EPA memo that was released was hand-signed by six scientists in the US government's Environmental Risk Branch of the Environmental Fate and Effects Division. The 500+ page study was co-authored by Dr. Frank T. Farrugia, Colleen M. Rossmeisl, Dr. James A. Hetrick, and Melanie Biscoe, and was subject to peer review by twelve other scientists. Its top-line findings are "based on the results from hundreds of toxicity studies on the effects of atrazine on plants and animals, over 20 years of surface water monitoring data, and higher ...
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Pilot Breaks Rules To Save Animals From Fort McMurray Fire 13.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For pilot Keith Mann, loading dozens of animals onto his plane in order to evacuate them from the historic Fort McMurray wildfire in Canada was the right thing to do, even if it was against the rules. Nearly 90,000 people were forced to flee from the wildfire that raged through Alberta last week, in what is likely to be the country's costliest natural disaster . As citizens of Fort McMurray relocated to camps for refuge, many struggled with how to bring along their furry friends. Some were even  forced to leave them behind . The energy company Suncor, which has an airport located northwest of Fort McMurray, offered its planes to fly evacuees south of the blaze. On Tuesday, around 300 citizens showed up at the airport -- with nearly 100 animals in tow. "The terminal was quite a sight," Mann said. "Just full of animals." Mann, Suncor’s manager of flight operations, said that he quickly realized the dilemma. "I didn’t want our personnel to be faced with the decision of whether to separate these people from ...
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Court Hearing Will Focus on EPA's Failure to Protect Nation's Endangered Wildlife From Pesticides 6.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals will hear arguments Monday, May 9 in the most comprehensive legal action ever brought under the Endangered Species Act to protect rare and threatened plants and animals from pesticides in the United States. The Center for Biological Diversity and Pesticide Action Network North America are challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s systemic failure to assess the impacts of more than 30 pesticides known to be harmful to dozens of endangered species found across the ...
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EPA Finds Atrazine Likely Harming Most Species of Plants, Animals in U.S. 4.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The amount of the herbicide atrazine that’s released into the environment in the United States is likely harming most species of plants and animals, including mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles, according to a preliminary risk assessment by the Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine is well known as a hormone disruptor that has been linked to birth defects and cancer in humans and contamination of ground-, surface- and drinking-water ...
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In Memory of the Woman Who Helped Bears in Distress 29.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Else Poulsen with Grace, an American black bear, at a refuge center in New Jersey. Poulsen, a bear behavioralist, died last week. Photograph by Angela Kyle, courtesy of the Bear Care Group Few people know bears as intimately as author and bear behavioralist Else Poulsen, who died on April 15 in her home in Ontario, Canada, after a battle with cancer. She was 61. If ever there was a bear whisperer, Poulsen was one. She raised bears, comforted bears, taught bears, learned from bears, had bears communicate their needs to her, and nursed bears back to health. She shared in the joy of a polar bear discovering soil under her paws for the first time in 20 years, felt the pride of a cub learning to crack nuts with her molars. She also grieved at the barbarity of captivity for Asian black bears in China and Vietnam, which is how she and I bonded, as I'd been researching bear bile trafficking and bile farms for my book Animal Investigators. "Nothing stumped her," says Jill Robinson, who often sought Poulsen's ...
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The Dithering Dozen: Twelve Prominent Climate Deniers 25.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Back in 2007, arguably the most leader-like thing Alaska Governor Sarah Palin could have done was her executive order establishing a state "Climate Change Sub-Cabinet." Her order reads, "Climate change is not just an environmental issue It is also a social, cultural, and economic issue important to all Alaskans." She went there. But nowadays, with the knob on her cray-cray meter cranked up to eleven, she says  climate change is a hoax . This week, she metaphorically donned an Alaskan tinfoil toque to pitch Climate Hustle, a new climate denial documentary. "We're told by fearmongers that global warming is due to man's activities and this presents strong arguments against that in a very relatable way," she said in an interview with the political journal Variety Daily. Then, as I stewed about how shedding one's rationality has become a cherished political talent in America, I ran down the list of politicians and media figures who, in playing to their conservative base, have abruptly decided that everything ...
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Spotted bats, ptarmigan, lynx, other wildlife prioritized in Colorado 8.4.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Colorado unveiled wildlife-saving priorities for the next decade, aiming to ensure survival of 210 imperiled species including lynx, wolverines, prairie chickens, frogs, ptarmigan, ...
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