User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Amphibians
Last updated: Jan 11 2017 13:26 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Mugshots of extinct animals 11.1.2017 CNN: Top Stories
When professional photographers talk about "the field," they're often referring to some far-flung rainforest or iceberg -- a distant locale where they travel to make interesting pictures.
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One Artist's Mission to Save Endangered Species: Louis Masai Completes "The Art Of Beeing" Tour 6.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LOS ANGELES:  Louis Masai, Leaping Frogs and Crawling Crayfish in LA : “The Art Of Beeing” “I painted the Shasta crayfish (or as Americans call it; crawfish) in Venice, an endangered species native to northeast California There are only seven remaining populations of the Shasta crayfish left and are found only in Shasta County, California, in the Pit River drainage and two tributary systems, Fall River and Hat Creek drainages,” -LM PHOENIX:  A Jaguar in Phoenix: Louis Masai and “The Art Of Beeing” “It’s always hard to formulate too much of an understanding of a city when you are only there for a very short time…and I guess a lot of this trip has been that way, but even more so in Phoenix, with only two nights and one day.” -LM TEXAS & TENNESSEE:   Flying Squirrels and Houston Toads : Louis Masai “I guess the attraction is the abundance of frats and bar culture in the area. I got to know a handful of these homeless folks over the five days this mural took to complete and I can definitely see that the new ...
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We'll Never See These Animals Again 31.12.2016 Mother Jones
If 2016 was a rough year for the animal kingdom, 2017 could be worse. Most scientists agree that we are experiencing a sixth mass extinction, but unlike the previous five that extended over hundreds of millions of years and occurred because of cataclysmic natural disasters, humans are responsible for this one. Climate change, agricultural expansion , wildlife crime, pollution, and disease have created a shocking acceleration in the disappearance of species. The World Wildlife Fund recently predicted that more than two-thirds of the vertebrate population—mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, and reptiles—would be lost over the next three years if extinctions continue at the current rate. A 2015 study that appeared in the journal Science Advances suggests that the rate of vertebrate extinction has increased nearly 100 times. Paul Ehrlich, a professor of population studies at Stanford University and a co-author of the study, notes half the life forms that people know about are already extinct. Another study, ...
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The Repository of Depravity: Dismembered Animals Line the Shelves of a Federal Warehouse 27.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
A visit to a macabre federal warehouse for storing confiscated animal products evokes the story of Noah's Ark. But this surreal place is a tableau of extinction, not preservation. The shelves of animal parts offer a chilling look at humans' disregard for other species. A zebra in Colorado's National Wildlife Property Repository is tragically and surrealistically removed from where he belongs. (Copyright © Britta Jaschinski 2016)It is hard to describe the array of confiscated animals and animal parts that fills the shelves of the National Wildlife Property Repository, a federal warehouse on the fringes of Denver, Colorado. With multiple representatives of every species imaginable, it seems at first a bit like an ark, but a perverse one: perhaps fittingly so for our precarious ecological situation. These animals did not walk up the gangplank as in familiar representations of the biblical scene. They arrived lifeless, inanimate: not really animals so much as things. They are arrayed not two-by-two or ...
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... frogs, too 26.12.2016 CNN: Top Stories
The "blue jeans" frog is practically screaming to be noticed. Its head is blood red, and its legs are denim blue. It looks like it's wearing jeggings. But this little critter, also known as the strawberry poison dart frog, is only about the size of a fingernail. It spends most of its time either high up in the trees in this Central American rainforest or rooting around in the gooey "leaf litter" of the forest floor.
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Gingrich Renews the Right’s Declaration of War on Age of Roosevelt 21.12.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Harvey Kaye

Seventy-five years ago this past January, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt went before Congress and the American people to declare that a generation’s “rendezvous with destiny” had come, that the Nazis, Fascists, and Imperialists would strike without warning and Americans had to not only ready themselves for that possibility, but also turn the nation into the Arsenal of Democracy.

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Humans Just Killed Off These 12 Animals, And You Didn't Even Notice 17.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For thousands of years, the Bramble Cay melomys, a small, mouse-like rodent, eked out a living on a tiny coral island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. It was the reef’s only endemic mammal species, and survived on the few plants that grew on its island home. But as climate change expedited sea level rise and increased storm surges that flooded the low-lying island, the Bramble Cay melomys and its food supply was severely threatened. In June, after years of fruitless searching, scientists announced that they could no longer find any trace of the rodent.  The melomys was posthumously bestowed the ignominious title of the first mammal to go extinct because of human-induced global warming . “Sadly,” WWF-Australia spokesperson Darren Grover told The New York Times, “it won’t be the last.”  Scientists say the planet is currently on the precipice of the sixth mass extinction , an event that could see the wiping out of at least 75 percent of the Earth’s species. The current extinction rate is at least  100 ...
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Pretty Much Every Living Thing Is Already Feeling The Effects Of Climate Change 11.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change has already touched almost all life on the planet , even under moderate rates of global warming, according to a report published Thursday in the journal Science. An international team of researchers found 82 percent of key biological processes necessary for healthy ecosystems had been impacted by the phenomenon. The changes have been felt even though the world is just 1 degree Celsius warmer than pre-industrial levels. “We’re already seeing salamanders shrink in size, we’re seeing migratory birds change their migratory routes, we’re seeing species interbreeding now, because of just a small degree of warming,” said James Watson, a professor at the University of Queensland and senior author of the report. Scientists are currently gathered in Marrakech, Morocco, to work out details of the landmark Paris climate agreement , which aims to keep the world from warming more than 2 degrees Celsius. Anything hotter than that will likely cause a slew of troubling events: melting glaciers, rising ...
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Digital Life project aims to create 3D models of all living animals 7.11.2016 TreeHugger
Scientists hope to use a special camera array to preserve the details of life on Earth, starting with endangered species.
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Can digital ecosystems save species from extinction? 3.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It's a fact: Homo sapiens are wiping out the rest of the planet's species. How can the surge of digital technology be harnessed to protect biodiversity?
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Nature Conservancy of Canada, Earth Rangers and SFI want to make life less ccary for amphibians at Halloween and all year round 31.10.2016 TreeHugger
Slimy, slithery creatures take centre stage at Halloween, but they fascinate children all year round.
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Report Declares Global Wildlife Populations Are Plunging. But It's Complicated 28.10.2016 NPR Health Science
The WWF report asserts that wildlife populations have dropped by a startling percentage since 1970. The details and extent of that decline, however, are more complex than any one number can capture.
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Absent Radical System Change, World Faces Two-Thirds Wildlife Loss by 2020 27.10.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Global populations of wild animals could be down by two-thirds by 2020 without reform to food and energy systems, according to a devastating new report out Thursday.

The analysis by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the Zoological Society of London finds that animal populations dropped 58 percent between 1970 and 2012. Without radical action, the world could witness a decline of 67 percent by 2020.

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Newt Gingrich to Megyn Kelly: You’re ‘fascinated with sex’ 26.10.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW YORK (AP) — Former Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich has told Fox News host Megyn Kelly she is “fascinated with sex” amid criticism of her coverage of sexual misconduct accusations against GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump. The heated exchange came Tuesday night on Kelly’s program. Kelly responded to Gingrich’s comment with a chuckle and […]
Biodiversity hotspots are also hotspots of invasion 24.10.2016 EcoTone
By Xianping Li, of the Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology within the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, as well as the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China. Li and colleagues’ Research Communications paper “Risk of biological invasions is concentrated in biodiversity hotspots” ...
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10,000 Critically Endangered Frogs Have Suddenly Died In Peru's Lake Titicaca 19.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Peruvian authorities are investigating the deaths of over 10,000 critically endangered frogs in Lake Titicaca. The cause of the Titicaca water frog massacre remains a mystery, though local activists have said water pollution and government negligence are to blame. The creature, also known as the Titicaca scrotum frog because of the folds in its skin, is endemic to the large freshwater lake that spans from Peru to Bolivia. Once common in the area, the frog has been driven to near-extinction in recent decades by habitat degradation and harvesting for human consumption. Since 1990, the frogs’ population has declined more than 80 percent , the International Union for Conservation of Nature said. In recent years, the frog has faced a new threat. Polluted waters are killing the amphibious animal by the thousands, activists say. More than 10,000 frogs across a 30-mile area around Lake Titicaca have recently turned up dead, according to Peru’s National Forestry and Wildlife Service. The agency said it was ...
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Thousands of frogs suddenly croak 18.10.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Peruvian authorities want to know why more than 10,000 endangered frogs living near Lake Titicaca have suddenly died.
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The First Fight Donald Trump Should Pick As President, According To Newt Gingrich 22.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This week, The New Yorker published a report hypothesizing what President Donald Trump’s first term in office might look like . Evan Osnos interviewed former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who’s been advising the candidate on policy matters, about what to expect if Trump actually takes the White House. Gingrich told Osnos that he’s encouraged Trump to start a war over job security for federal employees. Conservatives have long bemoaned how difficult it can be to fire government workers. According to The New Yorker, Gingrich seems convinced that attacking job protections for civil servants would be a worthwhile opening battle, both as policy and as politics. Per Osnos: Gingrich told me that he is urging Trump to give priority to an obscure but contentious conservative issue—ending lifetime tenure for federal employees. This would also galvanize Republicans and help mend rifts in the Party after a bitter election. “Getting permission to fire corrupt, incompetent, and dishonest workers—that’s the absolute ...
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Nostalgic Travel Posters Showcase Extinct Animals You'll Never Get To See 15.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What would you do if you had a time machine? Meet your distant ancestors? Kill baby Hitler ? See some of magnificent animals that are now extinct? Unknown Tourism , a series of vintage-style images by travel company Expedia UK, is a throwback tribute to some of the creatures we’ll never get to see. Human activity has wiped most of them off the face of the planet. (The golden toad is the one possible exception ― some scientists believe that creature died off as a result of manmade climate change, but one study suggests this may not have been the case. ) “These posters were intended as a way of commemorating some of the incredible wildlife we’ve lost, as well as revealing something about these countries that travellers wouldn’t necessarily think of when they visit,” Matt Lindley, who worked with Expedia on the project, told The Huffington Post in an email. “That said, if their visual appeal can also get more people thinking about biodiversity loss, that can only be a good thing.” For now, he added, the ...
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In The Battle To Save Frogs, Scientists Fight Fungus With Fungus 10.9.2016 NPR News
A deadly fungus is devastating frog populations around the world. In California, scientists are racing to find a way to immunize one species, mountain yellow-legged frogs, against the fungus.
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