User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Amphibians
Last updated: Sep 01 2014 23:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Nature and conservation from a perfect point of view 1.9.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
An idyllic farmhouse, challenging thoughts on conservation, an author who sounds like a great guy. What's not to hate in A Buzz in the ...
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Oregon spotted frog gains protection as threatened species 29.8.2014 Seattle Times: Local
Twenty-three years after it was first proposed for protection by the Endangered Species Act, the Oregon spotted frog is being listed as a threatened species.
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Woman Discovers Her Cat Is Cheating On Her 29.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This cat is a real cad. It all started in 2000 when Alice Alexander of Wellington, New Zealand bought "Ming," a Siamese cat. When the family moved to Strathmore in 2005, Ming would go wandering, often returning home not hungry and without his collar, which had his name and the Alexanders' phone number. The wandering became more frequent, then in 2010 Ming disappeared. Then in May, 2014, the "no-good, dirty cat," as Gawker refers to him, showed up outside Alexander's home, meowing as if nothing had happened over the last four years. Through some sleuthing detailed at Stuff, Alexander was able to determine that Ming was leading a double life, with her neighbors, the Smith family. Now Ming, also known as "Cleo" is the subject of a heated custody battle. Ming/Cleo sounds like the cat equivalent of Ronald Stan, a Canadian man who, it was revealed this week, had been missing for 37 years after a mysterious barn fire. He was located by Canadian authorities who discovered he was living in Oklahoma. Stan, ...
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20 New Species Of Coral Listed As Threatened 28.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government is protecting 20 types of colorful coral by putting them on the list of threatened species, partly because of climate change.


Five species can be found off the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of Florida, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The other 15 are in the Pacific Ocean area near Guam and American Samoa.


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration originally looked at listing 66 species, but Wednesday listed only 20 for various reasons. All are called threatened, not endangered. Coral reefs, which are in trouble worldwide, are important fish habitats.


The agency cited threats to coral from global warming, including oceans getting more acidic, water getting warmer and a bleaching disease. Other threats include fishing practices. Two coral species already were listed.

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Fantastically Wrong: The Legend of the Homicidal Fire-Proof Salamander 27.8.2014 Wired Top Stories
In the first century AD, Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder threw a salamander into a fire. He wanted to see if it could indeed not only survive the flames, but extinguish them, as Aristotle had claimed such creatures could. But the salamander didn’t … uh … make it. [HTML1] Yet that didn’t stop the legend ...
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What Is This Mysterious Red Blob? 26.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An Australian woman has discovered a strange creature she can't identify.

So she did what no one would do: wrapped it in a towel and took it home.

Apparently, it smells awful.


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Rare Blue Lobster Caught By Maine Lobsterman 26.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SCARBOROUGH, Maine (AP) — A Maine lobsterman says he and his 14-year-old daughter caught a one-in-two-million crustacean: a blue lobster.

WCSH-TV (http://on.wcsh6.com/1loUcOM ) reports Jay LaPlante of the Miss Meghan Lobster Catch company caught the curious creature in Scarborough around 10:45 a.m. Saturday. LaPlante and daughter Meghan were hauling traps when she discovered the bright blue critter. The story has a happy ending for the lobster. Meghan says she is naming it Skyler and donating it to the Maine State Aquarium, far from any dinner rolls or pats of butter. The aquarium says it has three other blue lobsters and an orange one.

LaPlante says it's the first time he has caught a blue lobster.

___

Information from: WCSH-TV, http://www.wcsh6.com
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Florida Citrus Growers Wage 'War' To Try And Stop Deadly Greening Disease 24.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LAKE WALES, Florida (AP) — Citrus has always been synonymous with Florida. The orange adorns the state license plate. The University of Florida's famed football stadium was named after an orange magnate. There is even a county called Citrus. Throughout the decades, the citrus industry has always stood strong — through freezes, hurricanes and rampant development. But now the $9 billion industry is facing its biggest threat yet, putting at risk the state's economy but also its very identity. Blame a mottled brown bug no bigger than a pencil eraser that carries a lethal disease. In China, where the problem was first discovered, it's called huanglongbing. Translation: "the yellow dragon disease." In Florida, it's known simply as "greening." It arrived here via an invasive bug called the Asian Citrus Psyllid, which carries bacteria that are left behind when the psyllid feeds on a citrus tree's leaves. The tree continues to produce useable fruit, but eventually disease clogs the vascular system. Fruit falls, ...
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Gingrich: Can Obama handle ISIS? 23.8.2014 CNN: Top Stories
Newt Gingrich says it's troubling that a vicious group like ISIS can recruit so many young men from Britain.
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Un-bee-lievable: 50,000 Bees Living In NYC Ceiling 22.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City woman had some unexpected roommates living in her apartment: 50,000 bees.

WABC-TV reports (http://7ny.tv/1whc4PZ ) beekeepers removed the swarm from Frieda Turkmenilli's ceiling this week after her neighbors in Queens alerted the building manager. Turkmenilli says she saw only a few bees buzzing around over the last few weeks and never realized how many had taken up residence right above her head.

The beekeepers say the bees and the 17 honeycombs they built are headed to an upstate farm.

Turkmenilli says she already misses them and wishes they had left behind some honey.

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Information from: WABC-TV, http://www.7online.com
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Rescued Florida Panther Cub 'Yuma' Gets Permanent New Home 22.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Seven months ago state biologists found an abandoned, newborn Florida panther in critical condition in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge near Naples. The tiny cub was cold and barely alive -- but don't worry, this story has a happy ending. The baby panther, closely watched by veterinarians and biologists, has recovered and is now moved in to his permanent enclosure. Named Yuma, an American Indian word for "son of the chief," the young panther explored his new, refurbished home this week at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park in Florida. The new enclosure comes complete with pool, climbing logs and bobcat neighbors to play with. Yuma happily chews a stick in his new enclosure Florida panthers are extremely endangered. Only 100 to 180 exist in south Florida , and they are the only known breeding population of an animal that once roamed throughout the southeastern United States. It was impossible to return Yuma to the wild because he was abandoned at such a young age and during ...
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Urine Trouble At Albuquerque's BioPark Zoo 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Spend any time at any zoo and you're bound to catch the scent of animal waste. That's how it is at the Albuquerque's BioPark Zoo, but it's not the zoo animals that are stinking up the joint. It's the human visitors. Park employees have recently been finding puddles of urine near the polar bear exhibit, and suspect that it's the results of kids who couldn’t quite make it to the bathroom, according to KOAT TV. “It’s kind of gross, but as I say, I think it’s something that’ll happen in most heavily visited places,” zoo curator Bill Aragon told the station. The zoo tries to combat animal piss with the help of an odor-eating "pee eliminator," but human urine is different, according to BioPark Director Rick Janser. The pee scandal is pissing off a lot of Albuquerque residents. The Albuquerque Journal felt so strongly about the problem that it wrote a scathing editorial: Albuquerque’s BioPark is a multimillion-dollar public investment that has become the No. 1 tourist destination in the state. And while it is ...
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Despite Progress, Long Fight Ahead to Protect Rare Wildlife From Pesticides 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hardly news that many of the more than 18,000 pesticide products approved for use in this country have been linked to cancer and other severe health effects in humans. Indeed, more than one billion pounds of pesticides are dumped on the North American landscape every year. Some chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors , interfere with the natural hormones in our bodies that regulate reproduction, brain function and immune response, and may be linked to increased risk for developmental and reproductive problems in both humans and wildlife. Despite the well-documented risks, the U.S. has continued to allow the widespread use of these chemicals, even while they've been banned in other countries. The European Union, for example, has outlawed atrazine , a widely used weed-killer in the U.S. that is also a common contaminant of drinking water and may be linked to increased risk of birth defects in people , frogs and fish . That chemicals remain in widespread use despite known risks reflects serious cracks ...
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Albino Crocodile Named Michael Jackson Killed After Attacking Fisherman 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An albino crocodile known as "Michael Jackson" has been put to death after it killed a 57-year-old fisherman on Australia's Adelaide River. This grisly death happened Monday about 37 miles from Darwin. Officials said the man waded into a river to unsnag his line when, suddenly, the 14.7-foot crocodile attacked the man. "He was there with his wife and he was fishing on the water's edge," Police Superintendent Jo Foley told ABC.net.au. "She left the scene because she saw this happen." Paramedics treated her for shock. Police and rangers quickly scoured the river looking for "Michael Jackson" and, later that night, shot and killed the crocodile and recovered the unnamed man's body. "They acted appropriately to shoot him but it's a real shame they had to do it. He is a well-known, well-loved crocodile," Adam Britton, a crocodile researcher at Charles Darwin University, told the Sydney Morning Herald. Britton told the paper that albinism is "incredibly rare" in crocodiles so "Michael Jackson" was especially ...
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If Your Fridge Dies, Should You Put Frogs In Your Milk? 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. Milk can go bad four hours into a blackout , even if it's kept in a closed refrigerator. But rather than letting a power outage make us feel powerless to store food, or otherwise live our lives, we can usually find inspiration among the timeless life hacks our ancestors passed down from simpler eras. Some are obvious, like burning candles for light, burning wood for heat and wearing cotton to stay cool. Others, however, require a longer leap of faith. If you really need to preserve milk in a lengthy blackout, for example, you could try the old Russian and Finnish trick of dropping in a live frog. People in Russia and Finland did this for centuries before modern refrigeration, and the technique reportedly survived into the 20th century in some rural areas. Yet iceboxes and electric refrigerators eventually made it obsolete, letting it fade from use and become seen as an old wives' tale. Thanks to modern science, we now know the frog-in-milk method ...
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Pangolin, Star Tortoise Vanishing As Indian Poachers Target Lesser-Known Animals 18.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW DELHI (AP) — Wildlife poachers, hindered by India's efforts to protect majestic endangered animals including tigers and rhinos, have begun to think smaller. And activists say scores of the country's lesser-known species are vanishing from the wild as a result. The Indian pangolin — a scaly critter whose defense mechanism of rolling up into a ball is no help against humans — and the star tortoise — a popular pet that maxes out at a foot in length — are just two of the species that are being killed or smuggled in increasing numbers while conservation efforts focus on such iconic animals such as tigers and elephants. "The problem is that we were turning a blind eye to all lesser-known species and suddenly this very lucrative trade has been allowed to explode," said Belinda Wright, director of the Wildlife Protection Society of India, an advocacy group. Wildlife specialists say the growing affluence of China, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries has helped drive the demand for exotic animals. Some ...
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To Save Endangered Tortoises, Wildlife Officials Take Unusual Step To Promote Sterilization 17.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LAS VEGAS (AP) — The federal government is taking the unusual step of beginning to sterilize an endangered species it is trying to save. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service officials say they have to curb the backyard breeding of desert tortoises because the growing population of unwanted pet tortoises diverts resources from efforts to preserve the species in the wild. Mike Senn, assistant field supervisor for the Fish &Wildlife Service in Nevada, told the Las Vegas Review-Journal that it can be "a really difficult issue" to explain to people. He said simply breeding more tortoises won't save the species if not enough is done to improve and protect natural habitat and address threats in the wild. Captive tortoises threaten native populations because they can carry diseases with them when they escape or are released illegally in the desert. The agency will hold a two-day clinic in Las Vegas later this month to teach veterinarians from Nevada, Arizona, California and Utah new sterilization techniques from the ...
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Homeless Fed 809-Pound Tiger Shark In Texas 15.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (AP) — An 809-pound tiger shark caught in the Gulf of Mexico earlier this month has been cooked and served to more than 90 poor and homeless Texans.

Timon's Ministries in Corpus Christi set up the donation of about 75 pounds of shark meat. Executive director Kae Berry tells the San Antonio Express-News that the 12-foot, 7-inch shark was the biggest fish ever donated to the center. A volunteer chef breaded and baked the meat. Fisherman Ryan Spring of San Antonio had said he caught the shark after reeling it in for more than seven hours.

Berry says the volunteer chef did a great job preparing the food and "most people really enjoyed it." And the center says there are enough leftovers to serve up some shark stew next week.
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Dog Elected Mayor In Minnesota 13.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Dreams do come true -- even for canines. This week, a 7-year-old dog named Duke was elected mayor of Cormorant , a small town in Minnesota. The 12 residents each paid one dollar to cast their vote , local outlets report. (Story continues below.) — WCCO - CBS Minnesota (@WCCO) August 13, 2014 The Great Pyrenees apparently won by a landslide, beating out another human contender for the mayorship. "Poor Richard Sherbrook that owns the Cormorant Store, he didn't even have half as many votes as Duke did ," local resident Tricia Maloney told area news outlet WDAY-TV. Duke will hold his position for one year after he's officially sworn in on Saturday. His salary? A year's worth of kibble , donated from a local pet food store. Duke is not the first non-human to be elected to public office . Stubbs the cat , for example, has been the honorary mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska, for the past 17 years. Following a successful write-in campaign, the feline was sworn in as mayor of the small village shortly after his birth. ...
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Dog Elected Mayor In Minnesota 13.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Dreams do come true -- even for canines. This week, a 7-year-old dog named Duke was elected mayor of Cormorant , a small town in Minnesota. The 12 residents each paid one dollar to cast their vote , local outlets report. (Story continues below.) — WCCO - CBS Minnesota (@WCCO) August 13, 2014 The Great Pyrenees apparently won by a landslide, beating out another human contender for the mayorship. "Poor Richard Sherbrook that owns the Cormorant Store, he didn't even have half as many votes as Duke did ," local resident Tricia Maloney told area news outlet WDAY-TV. Duke will hold his position for one year after he's officially sworn in on Saturday. His salary? A year's worth of kibble , donated from a local pet food store. Duke is not the first non-human to be elected to public office . Stubbs the cat , for example, has been the honorary mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska, for the past 17 years. Following a successful write-in campaign, the feline was sworn in as mayor of the small village shortly after his birth. ...
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