User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Amphibians
Last updated: Nov 11 2016 03:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Pretty Much Every Living Thing Is Already Feeling The Effects Of Climate Change 11.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change has already touched almost all life on the planet , even under moderate rates of global warming, according to a report published Thursday in the journal Science. An international team of researchers found 82 percent of key biological processes necessary for healthy ecosystems had been impacted by the phenomenon. The changes have been felt even though the world is just 1 degree Celsius warmer than pre-industrial levels. “We’re already seeing salamanders shrink in size, we’re seeing migratory birds change their migratory routes, we’re seeing species interbreeding now, because of just a small degree of warming,” said James Watson, a professor at the University of Queensland and senior author of the report. Scientists are currently gathered in Marrakech, Morocco, to work out details of the landmark Paris climate agreement , which aims to keep the world from warming more than 2 degrees Celsius. Anything hotter than that will likely cause a slew of troubling events: melting glaciers, rising ...
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Digital Life project aims to create 3D models of all living animals 7.11.2016 TreeHugger
Scientists hope to use a special camera array to preserve the details of life on Earth, starting with endangered species.
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Can digital ecosystems save species from extinction? 3.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It's a fact: Homo sapiens are wiping out the rest of the planet's species. How can the surge of digital technology be harnessed to protect biodiversity?
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Nature Conservancy of Canada, Earth Rangers and SFI want to make life less ccary for amphibians at Halloween and all year round 31.10.2016 TreeHugger
Slimy, slithery creatures take centre stage at Halloween, but they fascinate children all year round.
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Report Declares Global Wildlife Populations Are Plunging. But It's Complicated 28.10.2016 NPR Health Science
The WWF report asserts that wildlife populations have dropped by a startling percentage since 1970. The details and extent of that decline, however, are more complex than any one number can capture.
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Absent Radical System Change, World Faces Two-Thirds Wildlife Loss by 2020 27.10.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Global populations of wild animals could be down by two-thirds by 2020 without reform to food and energy systems, according to a devastating new report out Thursday.

The analysis by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the Zoological Society of London finds that animal populations dropped 58 percent between 1970 and 2012. Without radical action, the world could witness a decline of 67 percent by 2020.

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Newt Gingrich to Megyn Kelly: You’re ‘fascinated with sex’ 26.10.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW YORK (AP) — Former Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich has told Fox News host Megyn Kelly she is “fascinated with sex” amid criticism of her coverage of sexual misconduct accusations against GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump. The heated exchange came Tuesday night on Kelly’s program. Kelly responded to Gingrich’s comment with a chuckle and […]
Biodiversity hotspots are also hotspots of invasion 24.10.2016 EcoTone
By Xianping Li, of the Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology within the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, as well as the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China. Li and colleagues’ Research Communications paper “Risk of biological invasions is concentrated in biodiversity hotspots” ...
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10,000 Critically Endangered Frogs Have Suddenly Died In Peru's Lake Titicaca 19.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Peruvian authorities are investigating the deaths of over 10,000 critically endangered frogs in Lake Titicaca. The cause of the Titicaca water frog massacre remains a mystery, though local activists have said water pollution and government negligence are to blame. The creature, also known as the Titicaca scrotum frog because of the folds in its skin, is endemic to the large freshwater lake that spans from Peru to Bolivia. Once common in the area, the frog has been driven to near-extinction in recent decades by habitat degradation and harvesting for human consumption. Since 1990, the frogs’ population has declined more than 80 percent , the International Union for Conservation of Nature said. In recent years, the frog has faced a new threat. Polluted waters are killing the amphibious animal by the thousands, activists say. More than 10,000 frogs across a 30-mile area around Lake Titicaca have recently turned up dead, according to Peru’s National Forestry and Wildlife Service. The agency said it was ...
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Thousands of frogs suddenly croak 18.10.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Peruvian authorities want to know why more than 10,000 endangered frogs living near Lake Titicaca have suddenly died.
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The First Fight Donald Trump Should Pick As President, According To Newt Gingrich 22.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This week, The New Yorker published a report hypothesizing what President Donald Trump’s first term in office might look like . Evan Osnos interviewed former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who’s been advising the candidate on policy matters, about what to expect if Trump actually takes the White House. Gingrich told Osnos that he’s encouraged Trump to start a war over job security for federal employees. Conservatives have long bemoaned how difficult it can be to fire government workers. According to The New Yorker, Gingrich seems convinced that attacking job protections for civil servants would be a worthwhile opening battle, both as policy and as politics. Per Osnos: Gingrich told me that he is urging Trump to give priority to an obscure but contentious conservative issue—ending lifetime tenure for federal employees. This would also galvanize Republicans and help mend rifts in the Party after a bitter election. “Getting permission to fire corrupt, incompetent, and dishonest workers—that’s the absolute ...
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Nostalgic Travel Posters Showcase Extinct Animals You'll Never Get To See 15.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What would you do if you had a time machine? Meet your distant ancestors? Kill baby Hitler ? See some of magnificent animals that are now extinct? Unknown Tourism , a series of vintage-style images by travel company Expedia UK, is a throwback tribute to some of the creatures we’ll never get to see. Human activity has wiped most of them off the face of the planet. (The golden toad is the one possible exception ― some scientists believe that creature died off as a result of manmade climate change, but one study suggests this may not have been the case. ) “These posters were intended as a way of commemorating some of the incredible wildlife we’ve lost, as well as revealing something about these countries that travellers wouldn’t necessarily think of when they visit,” Matt Lindley, who worked with Expedia on the project, told The Huffington Post in an email. “That said, if their visual appeal can also get more people thinking about biodiversity loss, that can only be a good thing.” For now, he added, the ...
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In The Battle To Save Frogs, Scientists Fight Fungus With Fungus 10.9.2016 NPR News
A deadly fungus is devastating frog populations around the world. In California, scientists are racing to find a way to immunize one species, mountain yellow-legged frogs, against the fungus.
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California: Protections imposed for endangered frogs, toads 26.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Two types of yellow-legged frogs, and a kind of toad found in Yosemite National Park, won extra protection Thursday when federal authorities declared nearly 3,000 square miles in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains as critical habitat for the endangered animals. The designation by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service means closer controls […]
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Climate Change This Week: A Hot New High, Kids Show the Way, and More! 27.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OO Europe's Oil Imports 'Dependent On Unstable Countries' OO Power From "The New Coal", Natural Gas, Expected To Reach A Record High, Despite Climate Concerns - bad news, because besides the bad methane emissions from its production and distribution, burning it adds further emissions. OO US Coal Ash Crisis Builds - Coal production and use has plummeted, but the wastes left behind after burning it keep on coming, and they have been stored in lightly regulated, water-filled basins since at least the 1950s. OO China Pledged To Curb Coal Plants. Greenpeace Says It's Still Adding Them. The construction boom would result in about 400 gigawatts of excess capacity and waste more than $150 billion on building unneeded plants, said the new a report. But ... OO Record Growth In Chinese Renewable Energy Markets OO Coal India Accused Of Bulldozing Human Rights Amid Production Boom says Amnesty International report. <> OO Fossil Fuel Industry Risks Losing $33 Trillion in revenue in the next 25 years due to global ...
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What To Grow In Your Forage Garden 9.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pinyon syrup; acorn and cattail crackers; golden currant wine; mountain trout with Manzanita berries and willow bark. Wild-foraged foods are becoming increasingly popular as adventurous foodies connect ancient food-gathering traditions with the local terroir. But unless you have access to private lands, much wild food foraging is illegal. Native plants are protected, and harvesting them is poaching. Try the easy alternative to poaching in our public spaces and parks -- grow edible plants at home! We need more native plants, not fewer. Besides feeding yourself, you'll also support the native butterflies and birds that depend on these foods. We can forage in our gardens! When people harvest native plants in our struggling Southern California ecosystems, their impact on the plants, and the insects and animals that need them, is devastating. Taking bark, leaves, seeds, nuts and berries weakens the plants' abilities to renew themselves, reproduce, and survive brutal drought. By harvesting elderberries, for ...
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Frogs that can take the heat expected to fare better in a changing world 8.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Amphibians that tolerate higher temperatures are likely to fare better in a world affected by climate change, disease and habitat loss, according to two recent studies from the University of California, Davis.Frogs are disappearing globally, and the studies examine why some survive while others perish. The studies reveal that thermal tolerance -- the ability to withstand higher temperatures -- may be a key trait in predicting amphibian declines.HEAT-TOLERANT FROGS ESCAPE DEADLY FUNGUSOne of the world's deadliest wildlife pandemics is caused by a fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd. The fungus is linked to several amphibian extinctions and global declines.
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Asia's Unknown, Ignored And Disappearing Animals 8.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Often called the most beautiful of the monkeys, the Red-shanked Douc langur of Southeast Asia hasn't benefited much from its good looks. It is barely known to the public or most conservationists and is Endangered. Photo by Art G. on flickr CC BY 2.0 Try to name Asia's most endangered animals, and iconic species such as tigers, orangutans and rhinos likely leap to mind. But pangolins, langurs or saola? Not so much. Most of us haven't heard of these "other" species, and can't even picture them. Yet these little-known primates and other mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish are no less valuable to their habitats, and to earth's overall biodiversity, than their more famous, more charismatic Asian animal compatriots. But unfortunately for these lesser-known creatures, they face the same deadly threats as the "top" tier endangered species. They walk the same paths, use the same rainforest trees and mangrove swamps, and drink from the same rivers. They depend on the same ecosystems, and those ecosystems ...
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Are Trump's Veep Choices A Dog Whistle To Anti-LGBT Voters? 7.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
As the Veep stakes continue on both sides of the aisle, I was struck by the three potential candidates that are being most talked for the Trump ticket. Newt Gingrich, Mike Pence and Chris Christie. One thing each of these potential vice presidents share is their opposition to marriage equality. While each Veep candidate has accepted the Supreme Court ruling, Newt Gingrich said post the Supreme Court marriage equality ruling, "No one should think today's ruling ends anything. It just shifts the field of conflict." Where is the new field of conflict? The so called religious freedom front. Its star is Indiana Governor Mike Pence. Last year, Pence became the poster boy for anti-LGBT legislation when he signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) into law in Indiana. Pence said RFRA "ensures that Indiana law will respect religious freedom and apply the highest level of scrutiny to any state or local governmental action that infringes on people's religious liberty." Corporate leaders nationally and in ...
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Endangered Sonoma County Tiger Salamander Gets Recovery Plan 21.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In accordance with a settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a final recovery plan for the endangered Sonoma County population of the California tiger salamander . The plan calls for purchase and permanent protection of approximately 15,000 acres of the salamander’s breeding ponds and adjacent ...
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